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Routines vs. Schedules

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  1. Routines vs. Schedules • The terms routines and schedules are often used • interchangeably. • Schedules represent the big picture—the main activities to be completed daily. • Routines represent the steps done to complete the schedule.

  2. Routines vs. Schedules • Routines and schedules need to be taught directly. • Routines and schedules may vary. • Based on level of children’s interest Should be inherently flexible (to allow for firedrills, field trips, etc.)

  3. Routines • Activities and procedures that occur regularly • Often involve a series of responses • Preschool routines typically include • Arrival time • Bathroom time • Cleanup time • Departure • Nap time • Snack time • Story time

  4. Daily Schedule • Blocks of time for classroom activities • Sequence of classroom activities • Preschool schedules typically include • Group or circle time • Activity or center time • Snack time • Outdoor time • Story time

  5. Routines and Schedulesare important because: • They influence a child’s emotional, cognitive, and social development. • They help children feel secure. • They help children understand expectations. • They help reduce behavior problems. • They can result in higher rates of child engagement.

  6. Activity 1Pair-Think-Share • Pair with a partner • Think about all the steps involved in a classroom routine and write them in the partially completed chart • Share your routines and talk about what might happen if you completed the steps of each routine in a different order

  7. Things to Consider in DailySchedule Planning: • Balance of activities • Number of activities available • Number of adults available • Child’s attention span • Child’s level of alertness • Child’s cultural and linguistic background • Longer play periods result in increased play behaviors

  8. What Makes a Good Daily Schedule? • Balance of Activities • Active and Quiet • Large Group and Small Group • Indoor and Outdoor • Child-Directed and Teacher-Directed • Visual Cues • Use of daily picture schedule http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/resources/training_preschool.html www.environments.com

  9. Activity 2 • Divide into small groups • Identify a different daily activity (center time, recess, snack time, nap time) • Think about what can go wrong during this activity, possible causes, and ways to minimize or eliminate the problem • Share thoughts with the larger group

  10. Assessment The tool you choose should focus on the child’s strengths as well as their weaknesses. They should be observed in their natural setting. Parents need to be included when the child’s goals and objectives are determined.

  11. Observing Children Many theorist like, Froebel, Pestalozzi, Freud, Montessori, Gesell, Skinner and Piaget observed children on a daily basis. They recorded what they saw and what they heard. These recorded observations provided the foundation of what we now know today regarding early childhood development.

  12. Teachers as classroom observers • Make regularly scheduled observations • Make frequent note taking • Watching and recording authentic interactions • The ability to identify a progress the child has made • The ability to identify what the child needs • The ability to identify what the environment needs in order to meet each child’s needs.

  13. Parents as classroom observers • How their child socializes with other children • The classroom curriculum • How the other children interact with their child • How their child interact with the adults • What they child is able to do in the classroom