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Population. Where has the World’s population increased?. Key Issue 2: Where Has the World’s Population Increased?. The Main Points of this issue are: Distribution of World Population Growth Natural Increase Fertility Mortality. World Population Growth 1950–2000.

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Population

Population

Where has the World’s population increased?


Key issue 2 where has the world s population increased
Key Issue 2: Where Has the World’s Population Increased?

  • The Main Points of this issue are:

    • Distribution of World Population Growth

      • Natural Increase

      • Fertility

      • Mortality


World population growth 1950 2000
World Population Growth1950–2000

Fig. 2-6: Total world population increased from 2.5 to 6 billion in this half century. The natural increase rate peaked in the early 1960s and has declined since, but the number of people added each year did not peak until 1990.


Population basics
Population Basics

  • Geographers measure population change through three measures:

  • Crude birth rate (CBR) is the total number of live births in a year for every 1,000 people.

  • Crude death rate (CDR) is the total number of deaths in a year for every 1,000 people.

  • Natural increase rate (NIR) is the percentage by which a population grows in a year.

    • Compute by subtracting CDR from CBR

      • CDR 5/1000 and CBR 20/1000 then the NIR is 15/1000 or 1.5%

    • The term natural means that a country’s growth rate excludes migration.

    • The term crude means that we are concerned with society as a whole rather than a refined look at particular individuals or groups.


Crude birth rates
Crude Birth Rates

Fig. 2-8: The crude birth rate (CBR) is the total number of births in a country per 1,000 population per year. The lowest rates are in Europe, and the highest rates are in Africa and several Asian countries.


Natural increase rates
Natural Increase Rates

Fig. 2-7:The natural increase rate (NIR) is the percentage growth or decline in the population of a country per year (not including net migration). Countries in Africa and Southwest Asia have the highest current rates, while Russia and some European countries have negative rates.


Natural increase stats
Natural Increase Stats

  • The natural increase rate of the planet during the current decade (200-2010) is estimated to be 1.3 percent.

  • It is lower today than at its all-time peak of 2.2 percent in 1963.

  • World population increased from 3 to 4 billion in 14 years, 4 to 5 billion in 13 years, and from 5 to 6 billion in 12 years

  • The NIR during the second half of the twentieth century was high by historical standards.

  • The rate of natural increase affects the doubling time, which is the number of years needed to double a population.

  • When the NIR was 2.2 percent back in 1963, doubling time was 35 years.


Population


Fertility
Fertility of the population because the base population is so high.

  • Geographers use the total fertility rate to measure the number of births in a society

    • TFR is the average number of children a woman will have throughout her childbearing years (15-49)

  • CBR provides a picture of a society as a whole in a given year

  • TFR attempts to predict the future behavior of individual women

  • The TFR for the world is 2.7, this number varies greatly between LDCs and MDCs

    • TFR in some African countries exceed 6, Europethe TFR is 2 or less


Total fertility rates
Total Fertility Rates of the population because the base population is so high.

Fig. 2-9: The Total fertility rate (TFR) is the number of children an average woman in a society will have through her childbearing years. The lowest rates are in Europe, and the highest are in Africa and parts of the Middle East.


Mortality
Mortality of the population because the base population is so high.

  • Infant mortality rate (IMR) is the annual number of deaths of infants under 1year old, compared with live births

    • Usually expressed as deaths per 1000 births

  • Can you guess the pattern?

  • IMR reflects a country’s health care system

  • US has a higher IMR than other MCDs, why?


Infant mortality rates
Infant Mortality Rates of the population because the base population is so high.

Fig. 2-10: The infant mortality rate is the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births per year. The highest infant mortality rates are found in some of the poorest countries of Africa and Asia.


Life expectancy
Life Expectancy of the population because the base population is so high.

  • The average number of years a newborn infant can expect to live at current mortality levels

  • Western Europe: late 70s

  • Sub-Saharan Africa: 40s


Life expectancy at birth
Life Expectancy at birth of the population because the base population is so high.

Fig. 2-11: Life expectancy at birth is the average number of years a newborn infant can expect to live. The highest life expectancies are generally in the wealthiest countries, and the lowest in the poorest countries.


Where these rates are highest
Where These Rates Are Highest of the population because the base population is so high.

  • Higher rates of natural increase, crude birth, total fertility, and infant mortality, and lower life expectancy are in Less Developed Countries.


Crude death rates
Crude Death Rates of the population because the base population is so high.

Fig. 2-12: The crude death rate (CDR) is the total number of deaths in a country per 1,000 population per year. Because wealthy countries are in a late stage of the demographic transition, they often have a higher CDR than poorer countries.