social marketing vs media advocacy l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Social Marketing vs. Media Advocacy PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Social Marketing vs. Media Advocacy

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

Social Marketing vs. Media Advocacy - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 235 Views
  • Uploaded on

Social Marketing vs. Media Advocacy. Two Different Approaches Toward a Common Public Health Goal. Social Marketing.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Social Marketing vs. Media Advocacy' - arleen


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
social marketing vs media advocacy

Social Marketing vs. Media Advocacy

Two Different Approaches Toward a Common Public Health Goal

social marketing
Social Marketing
  • The use of marketing principles and techniques to influence a target audience to voluntarily accept, reject, modify or abandon a behavior for the benefit of individuals, groups or society as a whole.

HST 2200 JCD/REC

media advocacy
Media Advocacy
  • Media advocacy is "the strategic use of mass media to support community organizing to advance a social or policy initiative," (Dorfman and Wallack, 1996).

HST 2200 JCD/REC

social marketing4
Social Marketing
  • Focus is on the consumer
  • Begins with target audience
  • Public health professionals listen to needs and desires of the target audience and builds program from there.
  • Involves in-depth research and constant re-evaluation of every aspect of the program.

HST 2200 JCD/REC

slide5
Social marketing espouses that the same marketing principles that were being used to sell products to consumers could be used to “sell” ideas, attitudes, and behaviors.
  • Seeks to influence social behaviors in order to benefit the target audience and the general society, not to benefit the marketer.
  • Social marketing has been utilized in health programs for such diverse topics as drug abuse, heart disease, and organ donation.

HST 2200 JCD/REC

marketing mix the 5 p s
Marketing mix: The 5 “p’s”
  • Product
  • Price
  • Place
  • Promotion
  • Positioning
  • And in social marketing a few other “p’s”

HST 2200 JCD/REC

social marketing product
Social Marketing “Product”
  • Not necessarily a physical offering.
    • Physical product – condom
    • Services – medical exams
    • Practices – breastfeeding; eating a heart-healthy diet
    • Ideas – environmental protection
  • What is the consumers’ perceptions of the problem and the product and how important to them is the ideal that they need to take action against the problem?

HST 2200 JCD/REC

social marketing price
Social Marketing “Price”
  • "Price" refers to what the consumer must do in order to obtain the social marketing product.
  • This cost may be monetary, or it may instead require the consumer to give up intangibles, such as time or effort, or to risk embarrassment and disapproval.
  • If perceived cost is > perceived benefits, unlikely to be adopted.
  • If perceived benefits > perceived costs, chances of adoption of products is greater.
  • Cost can be neither to low, nor too high.

HST 2200 JCD/REC

social marketing place
Social Marketing “Place”
  • "Place" describes the way that the product reaches the consumer.
  • Intangible product
    • Doctors’ offices
    • Shopping malls
    • Mass media outlets
    • University health services
  • Idea is to insure accessibility to the target audience.

HST 2200 JCD/REC

social marketing promotion
Social Marketing “Promotion”
  • Promotion consists of the integrated use of advertising, public relations, promotions, media advocacy, personal selling and entertainment vehicles.
  • Positioning – make the case that the benefits of this product are more desirable than the competition.

HST 2200 JCD/REC

other social marketing p s
Other Social Marketing “P’s”
  • Publics
  • Partnership
  • Policy
  • Purse Strings
  • Examples?

HST 2200 JCD/REC

health campaigns utilizing social marketing principles
Health Campaigns Utilizing Social Marketing Principles
  • Australia:
    • Victoria Cancer Council developing its anti-tobacco campaign "Quit" (1988), and "SunSmart" (1988), its campaign against skin cancer which had the slogan Slip! Slap! Slop!.
    • Dancesafe followed the ideas of social marketing in its communication practices.
  • CDC campaign – “Why is this ulcer sufferer so happy?”
  • North Carolina – “Click It or Ticket!” Campaign
  • Florida – “Truth” campaign

HST 2200 JCD/REC

meet pat
MeetPat

HST 2200 JCD/REC

pat s x treme makeover
Pat’s “Xtreme Makeover”
  • Pat’s goal is to shape up, lose weight, and “look fabulous.”

HST 2200 JCD/REC

pat s x treme makeover15
Pat’s “Xtreme Makeover”
  • Will Pat look like this?

HST 2200 JCD/REC

pat s x treme makeover16
Pat’s “Xtreme Makeover”
  • Or this?

HST 2200 JCD/REC

applying social marketing principles
Applying social marketing principles:
  • Product
    • Adoption of a behavior change involving regular exercise and making better food choices resulting in better cardiovascular health and healthier weight
  • Price
    • Costs in behavioral and/or monetary terms are acceptable

HST 2200 JCD/REC

slide18
Place
    • Health club and dining establishments are appealing, accessible, and supportive
  • Promotion
    • Use e-mail, interpersonal, small group communication, and other appropriate techniques to advance the product

HST 2200 JCD/REC

slide19
Positioning
    • Demonstrate that the benefits of this product are more enticing than the competition, e.g. physical activity is a form of relaxation, not grueling exercise and low-fat meals could be considered an act of love for oneself.

HST 2200 JCD/REC

media advocacy20
Media Advocacy
  • According to the Prevention Research Center, "media advocacy is the purposeful and planned use of mass media to bring problems and policy solutions to the attention of the community and local decision-makers.”

HST 2200 JCD/REC

media advocacy21
Media Advocacy
  • While media advocacy efforts may take many forms, often they involve organizing attention-getting events to stimulate news coverage of an issue.
  • One frequent goal of media advocacy is to refocus the framing of a problem and its solutions from an individual level to an environmental or policy level.
    • Drinking will be solved through educating individual students (individual level).
    • Change drinking patterns on campus by changing the environment in which the behavior occurs (environmental or policy level).

HST 2200 JCD/REC

media advocacy comparison
Brand X Media

Individual Focus

Informs person with the problem and informs the general population

Health message

Information & personal change

Information gap as key

Media Advocacy

Group focus

Pressures decision makers & mobilizes community activists

Voice

Power and social change

Power gap as key

Media Advocacy Comparison

HST 2200 JCD/REC

media advocacy shifting focus
Problem definition as the individual level

Health as a personal concern

Short-term focus on program development

Using mass media to change health habits

Problem definition at the policy level

Health as a social issue

Long-term focus on policy development

Using mass media to influence policy-making

Media Advocacy: shifting focus

HST 2200 JCD/REC

references
References
  • Media Advocacy Toolkit.htm
  • “What is Social Marketing?,” Nedra Kline Weinreich

HST 2200 JCD/REC