Download
fieldwork logistics n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Fieldwork Logistics PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Fieldwork Logistics

Fieldwork Logistics

138 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Fieldwork Logistics

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Fieldwork Logistics

  2. OBJECTIVES • The importance of logistics in supporting high quality survey results and implementation schedule • Key logistical elements (transport, computers, supplies, etc.) • Organization • Coordination and management From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  3. Fieldwork and Office Equipment • Office and supplies • Computers • Printers • Software • Other office supplies • Vehicles • Electronic scales • Measuring boards • Iodine salt test kits • Fieldwork supplies From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  4. PREPARING FOR FIELDWORKrequires that field supervisors: • Obtain sample HH lists and/or maps for each area in which his/her team will be working and discuss problems • Become or be familiar with the area of work • Determine travel arrangements and accommodations • Contact local authorities to inform them about the survey From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  5. PREPARING FOR FIELDWORKrequires that field supervisors: • Obtain all monetary advances, supplies, and equipment • Careful preparation by the supervisor is important for • facilitating the work of the team in the field, • for maintaining interviewer morale, and • for ensuring contact with the central office From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  6. ORGANIZING FIELDWORKrequires that field supervisors: • Assign work to interviewers • Maintain fieldwork control sheets • Make sure that assignments are carried out • Make spot checks of the household questionnaire • (with the field editor) Regularly send completed questionnaires and progress reports to the field coordinator From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  7. ORGANIZING FIELDWORKrequires that field supervisors: • Keep headquarters informed of the team's location • Communicate any problems to the field coordinator • Take charge of the team vehicle • Be sure to develop a positive team spirit along with careful planning of field activities From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  8. Collecting Materials for fieldwork: Documents • Supervisor's and Editor's Manual • Interviewer's Manuals • Maps and household listing forms • ID cards • Letters of introduction • Questionnaires • Supervisor's Assignment Sheets • Interviewer's Assignment Sheets From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  9. Collecting Materials for fieldwork: Supplies • Blue pens for interviewers • Red pens for the field editor and supervisor • Clipboards, briefcases • Paper clips, scissors, string, staplers, tape, etc. • Envelopes to store completed questionnaires, • First aid kit From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  10. Monetary Advances and Communications • The supervisor should have sufficient funds • Including funds for fuel and minor vehicle repairs, for guides, and for communication with central office. • Advances for per diem allowances to be given directly to individual interviewers, field editors and supervisors. • Communication system of teams with the central office: supplies, payments, return of materials, etc. From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  11. Transportation and Accommodations • Travel arrangements and coordination • Vehicles, taxis, buses, boats, horses, etc. • Maintenance and security of the team vehicle. • Use of vehicle • The driver of the vehicle takes instructions from the supervisor. • Food and lodging arrangements From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  12. Contacting Local Authorities • Supervisor's responsibility to contact the regional, district, local, and village officials before starting work in an area. • Letters of introduction will be provided, but tact and sensitivity in explaining the purpose of the survey will help win the cooperation needed to carry out the interviews. From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  13. USING MAPS TO LOCATE CLUSTERS • Locating households in the sample • The need to visit all households selected • Maps are needed during all stages of a survey • Maps help the supervisor, editor and interviewers to determine: • the location of sample areas, • the distance to them, and • how to reach selected households. From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  14. Using Maps to Locate Clusters • Each team will be given: general cluster maps, household listing forms; for urban areas, sketch maps and written descriptions of the boundaries of selected areas. • The general cluster maps may show more than one cluster . • Each cluster is identified by a number (e.g. EA-05). From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  15. USING MAPS TO LOCATE CLUSTERS • Symbols are used to indicate certain features on the map such as roads, footpaths, rivers, localities, boundaries, etc. • If symbols are shown on the map, the supervisor and editor should know how to interpret them by using the legend. From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  16. USING MAPS TO LOCATE URBAN CLUSTERS • Urban clusters should have sketch maps and written descriptions to help locate the boundaries • Street names in urban areas will often help to locate the general area of clusters. • Boundaries can be streets, alleys, streams, city limits, power cables, walls, trees, etc. • Read the written description. From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  17. USING MAPS TO LOCATE RURAL CLUSTERS • It is usually possible to locate unnamed roads or imaginary lines by inquiring among people living in the vicinity. • While there are cases in which boundaries shown on the map no longer exist, or have changed location, do not jump to conclusions. • If you cannot locate a cluster, go on to the next one and discuss the matter with the field coordinator From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef

  18. In summary… • Prepare a detailed list of supplies and logistics items you will need • Be sure to have the items available before the survey implementation starts • Be “reasonably generous” in calculating survey supplies and be prepared to react rapidly if you need From Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) Regional Training Workshop – Survey Logistics, Unicef