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Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Intercollegiate Athletics PowerPoint Presentation
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Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Intercollegiate Athletics

Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Intercollegiate Athletics

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Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Intercollegiate Athletics

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  1. Sudden Cardiac Arrestin Intercollegiate Athletics Are you prepared?

  2. Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in exercising young athletes • Sudden cardiac death occurs in 1:43,000 NCAA student-athletes per year • The chance of survival decreases by 10% every minute after collapse • The average EMS response time is 6-8 minutes • The single greatest factor affecting survival is the time from cardiac arrest to defibrillation (shock) • AEDs improve survival through early defibrillation

  3. Screening • Student-athletes are required to have a pre-participation physical examination. • The traditional screen includes: • History (chest pain or passing out with exercise) • Physical exam (blood pressure, heart sounds) • Some schools perform EKG (electrocardiogram) to increase detection of athletes with at-risk conditions • Appropriate experience and resources are important for EKG screening to be utilized effectively • Insert institutional screening policy here if applicable

  4. Emergency Planning Written Emergency Action Plan for SCA Emergency communication system Trained responders in CPR/AED AED locations – all staff awareness Access to early defibrillation (<3-5 min collapse to shock) Practice and review of the response plan at least annually Integrate AEDS into local EMS system

  5. Emergency Action Plan  Essential elements of an emergency action plan include: • (insert specific institutional plans for all of the following) • Methods of communication • Personnel requiring CPR and AED training • Locations of AEDsfor early defibrillation • Practice and review of the response plan

  6. Chain of Survival EarlyRecognition EarlyCPR EarlyAED Improved Survival

  7. Recognition of SCA  • SCA should be suspected in any athlete who is collapsed and unresponsive • SCA should be suspected in any non-traumatic collapse • Brief seizure-like activity is common after collapse from SCA • Seizure = SCA until proven otherwise • Occasional gasping is not normal breathing… think SCA

  8. Early CPR • CPR can double or triple the chance of survival • < 1/3 of SCA victims receive bystander CPR • 2010 AHA guidelines • Hands-only CPR • Chest compressions • Push hard, push fast (100 per minute)

  9. AEDs provide a means of early defibrillation and the potential for effective management of SCA Athletes Students Staff Spectators Coaches Officials Visitors AEDs in Sport 2007

  10. The Collapsed and Unresponsive AthleteManagement of SCA • Suspect SCA in any collapsed and unresponsive athlete • An AED should be applied as soon as possible for rhythm analysis and shock if indicated Drezner; Heart Rhythm 2007

  11. Steps in the Management of SCA • Recognize SCA • Call for help / Call 9-1-1 • Begin chest compressions (CPR) • Retrieve the AED • Apply and use the AED as soon as possible • Continue CPR until EMS arrives

  12. Resources Inter-Association Task Force Recommendations on Emergency Preparedness and Management of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in High School and College Athletic Programs: A Consensus Statement. Journal of Athletic Training 2007;42(1):143–158 NCAA Health and Safety • http://www.ncaa.org/wps/portal/ncaahome?WCM_GLOBAL_CONTEXT=/ncaa/ncaa/academics+and+athletes/personal+welfare/health+and+safety/raising+awareness+of+sudden+cardiac+collapse+in+sports