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Set in Stone: The Face in Medieval Sculpture. September 26, 2006–February 19, 2007 Robert Lehman Wing. http://www.metmuseum.org/special/se_event.asp?OccurrenceId={6BCC8C4E-1870-43E4-AA95-E6A784B41BBD } [1.10.06].

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Set in Stone: The Face in Medieval Sculpture


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set in stone the face in medieval sculpture
Set in Stone: The Face in Medieval Sculpture

September 26, 2006–February 19, 2007Robert Lehman Wing

http://www.metmuseum.org/special/se_event.asp?OccurrenceId={6BCC8C4E-1870-43E4-AA95-E6A784B41BBD} [1.10.06]

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?Set in Stone? presents more than 80 medieval sculpted heads, half from the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art and half selected loans from American and European collections. Because historical events isolated these objects from their original settings, they became objects that could be collected, and objects whose lost histories curators and scholars would hope to recover. The exhibition considers several artistic and historic themes, including: the destruction of statues as an act of iconoclasm, the evolving notions of the ?portrait,? the use of science in the search for provenance, and more. Created from materials as diverse as marble, limestone, polychromed wood, and silver gilt, the carved heads date from the third century A.D. through the early 1500s and represent French, German, Italian, Spanish, Byzantine, English, and other medieval sculptural traditions. The exhibition draws together science, connoisseurship, archaeology, and history to examine these stunning works from different points of reference. Accompanied by a catalogue.

In connection with the exhibition, a symposium on "Facing the Middle Ages" will be held at the Metropolitan Museum on Saturday and Sunday, October 14 and 15, 2006 in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium. This event is free with Museum admission; tickets and reservations are not required. For more information, email lectures@metmuseum.org. The exhibition is made possible by The Florence Gould Foundation.

Additional support is provided by the Michel David-Weill Fund.

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Facing the Middle Ages: A Symposium in Honor of the Fiftieth Anniversary of The International Center for Medieval ArtOctober 14, 20069:45 a.m.–5:30 p.m.The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium Free with Museum admission Saturday

Opening RemarksMary B. Shepard, president, The International Center of Medieval Art9:45 a.m.Keynote Address: Heads Up and Original CapitalismRichard Brilliant, Anna S. Garbedian Professor in the Humanities, Columbia University, Emeritus10:00 a.m.Marginal Corbel Sculpture: Where New Identities EmergeNurith Kenaan-Kedar, professor, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University11:00 a.m.Sculptured Images of Saints in Medieval ItalyJulian Gardner, professor, Department of the History of Art, University of Warwick11:40 a.m.Beheaded We Stand: The Heads of Saint-Denis and the Problem of Eighteenth-Century Prerevolutionary VandalismXavier Dectot, conservator, Muse頎ational du Moyen Âge, Paris2:00 p.m.Neutron Activation Analysis from Sarlat to Jumi觥sGeorgia Wright, co-director, Limestone Sculpture Provenance Project2:40 p.m.Heads and Faces in Late ByzantiumAnnemarie Weyl Carr, University Distinguished Professor, Division of Art History, Southern Methodist University3:20 p.m.From Head to Face: Sculpting the True Image of ChristGerhard Wolf, director, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Florence4:00 p.m.DiscussionWillibald Sauerl䮤er, former director, Zentralinstitut f?stgeschichte, Munich4:40 p.m.

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Facing the Middle Ages: A Symposium in Honor of the Fiftieth Anniversary of The International Center for Medieval ArtOctober 15, 20069:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m.The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium Free with Museum admission Sunday

RemarksCharles T. Little, curator, Medieval Art and The Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum of Art9:45 a.m.Romanesque Portrait Sculpture: Vision and Real PresenceThomas Dale, professor, Department of Art History, University of Wisconsin, Madison10:00 a.m.Status and Significance of Beards in the Middle AgesGiles Constable, professor emeritus, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton10:40 a.m.The Jew?s Face: Gothic Art and Medieval Anti-Jewish CaricatureSara Lipton, associate professor, Department of History, Stony Brook University11:20 a.m.Rethinking the Origins of PortraitureStephen Perkinson, assistant professor, Department of Art History, Bowdoin College12:00 p.m.DiscussionJonathan J. G. Alexander, Sherman Fairchild Professor of Fine Arts, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University12:40 p.m.