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Inquiry and

Inquiry and

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Inquiry and

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  1. Inquiry and Reading in the Content Areas

  2. Seven Comprehension Strategies Making Connections Asking Questions Determining Importance Visualizing Inferring Synthesizing Repairing Comprehension: fix-up strategies

  3. Open Word Sort krill web flippers fluke tentacles meat plankton wings insects trees ocean seals molars rainforest

  4. Illinois School Park Forest, Illinois Dear Second Grade Students, Lions and tigers and bears, oh my! Those are some of the animals we will see on our trip to the zoo. But what do we know about these animals? Where do they live when they are not in a zoo? Do we have lions and tigers in the United States? Could parrots live in our backyards? Some animals are endangered and only live in zoo habitats. What is happening to their homes? Before we go to the zoo I would like you to find out about these animals and create guide books for us to use on our trip. Please include information about the way animals look and behave in their natural environment. We also need information about the animal’s survival, conservation, and importance. After we have learned about animals and visited them in the zoo the third graders will organize an election to choose a school mascot. A school mascot is a very important symbol. We need to choose a school mascot that is worthy of our attention and promotes school spirit! Most people choose a mascot because of the way it looks. Because you will know so much about animals I want you to nominate ten animals that could be our school mascot. The animals should represent all five classes - mammals, insects, reptiles, amphibians, and birds. Then we’ll have a school election to choose the best mascot for us. Be sure to include information about how these animals adapt and survive. We don’t want students choosing a mascot only because of the way it looks! I look forward to your nominations and to our trip to the zoo. Sincerely, Dr. Joyce Carmine, Principal Illinois School

  5. Semantic Features Chart

  6. Stages of Inquiry in the Classroom • Making Connections • Text to text, text to self, text to world • Open and closed word sorts • Encountering the Issue • getting the “big idea” • making connections • Task Analysis • defining the task • asking questions • Asking Questions • Right there, think and search • Author and you, in your head • Investigating Information • seeking, organizing, analyzing, • applying to project • Determining Importance • Features, structures of text • Note taking, graphic organizers • Facts to main ideas, summaries • Reasoning with Information • evaluating, creating, judging, • inferring, visualizing • making decisions • Inferring and Visualizing • creating models • using text clues and prior knowledge • using implicit and explicit information to reach conclusions (author and you) • Acting on Decisions • synthesizing • communicating findings • Synthesizing • text to text, self and world • applying to new settings and contexts • in your head

  7. Know and apply concepts that explain how living things function, adapt and change. Know and apply concepts that describe how living things interact with their environment Read: The Log Hotel By Anne Schreiber

  8. Aspects of Content Area Vocabulary “Here is my shuttle with the astronaut crew that I’ll STASH with my cars.” (The Bag I’m Taking to Grandma’s House) What synonym can you give for stash? Here is the book I want to read, PROPPED on my pillow What synonym can you give for propped? Colonies Honeycomb Pollen

  9. Aspects of Content Area Vocabulary Terms are often semantically related. Armbruster and Nagy, Vocabulary in content area lessons. 1992 cirrus cumulus stratus

  10. Aesop’s Fable: The Fox & The Sick Lion pounced lair semantically unrelated morsel grumbled obviously

  11. Open Word Sort krill web flippers fluke tentacles meat plankton wings insects trees ocean seals molars rainforest

  12. Closed Word Sort krill web flippers fluke tentacles meat plankton wings insects trees ocean seals molars rainforest • Categories: • Animal habitats • Animal features • Food for animals • no clue

  13. Closed Word Sort ocean rainforest web trees meat krill insects plankton • animal habitats food for animals flippers fluke tentacles wing molars • Categories: • Animal habitats • Animal features • Food for animals • no clue animal features

  14. Making Connections With Words Connect Two whales cub dens herbivore fur lodges kit beavers waste omnivore droppings fins and are connected because

  15. Making Connections With Words Word Splash More About Beavers, Page 28, 29 cheeks ticks first grader excrete nibbling

  16. Making Connections Anticipation Guides Me Text Mosquitoes eat plant nectar and pollinate plants. Mosquitoes make great food for fish. Honeydew is a favorite food of the male mosquito. The larvae do not breed successfully in water that has fish or frogs. Mosquitoes are the most dangerous Animal in the world.

  17. Types of Questions • There are how many types of bees? • How many eggs does the queen lay? • What does the drone do? • Where does a colony live? • What do worker bees do for the colony? • What do bees do with pollen? • Where do bees live?

  18. Half of the QAR In Your Head (Inference) In the Book (Investigation Information) Right There: Queens Lay 1500 eggs each day. Right There: Drones mate with the queen bee. • Worker Bees… • Make wax • Feed the larvae • Collect pollen • Store pollen • Make honey • Guard the hive

  19. The Other Half of the QAR In the Book (Gathering Information In Your Head (Inference) Author and You (Inference) Which bee is the busiest? Why is it necessary for the queen to lay so many eggs? Right There: Queens Lay 1500 eggs each day. Right There: Drones mate with the queen bee. • Worker Bees… • Make wax • Feed the larvae • Collect pollen • Store pollen • Make honey • Guard the hive On Your Own Do you know someone who works as hard as the bee?

  20. IN THE BOOK Right There: answer in text, easy to find; words used in question and used in answer are in same sentence IN MY HEAD Author and You: answer not in text; must think about what is known, what text is saying and how it fits together Question/Answer Relationship (QAR) • Think and Search: words and answers come from different parts of text (or books) • On My Own: using experiences to answer question

  21. I wonder…? • Choose a book, turn the pages and WONDER • Write “I wonder… (about animals)?” • Wonder and Wander in the books!

  22. I wonder... • what horses eat? • where horses live? • how horses help people?

  23. Change Over Time: Life Cycle of a Tree

  24. Change Over Time: Life Cycle of a Tree

  25. Finding Important Information: Vocabulary Words And Concepts (WAC) A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Reading Strategy: Determining Importance

  26. Category What is it? Properties Describe it. Comparison What is it like? Illustrations: What are some examples?

  27. Definition Characteristics word Examples Non-Examples The Frayer Model

  28. Definition A member of a class of higher vertebrates Characteristics • warm-blooded • have fur • produce milk Mammal Examples Non-examples • human • squirrel • dog • bat • horse • whale • cow • rabbit • frog • snake • turtle • butterfly • spider • lizard • shark • chicken The Frayer Model

  29. The Other Half of the QAR • David • Right There: • What did David do as soon as he saw the clock? • What type of shirt did David put on? • Think and Search • What did David look for before he left the house? • What steps did David take to get ready to leave the house? • Author and Me • Where was David headed that morning? • What time of day was David getting ready to go? • On My Own • Should parents wake their children up for school?

  30. Cutting Up With Facts Features Cows have four stomachs. They eat grass Ostriches have long nails. Frogs pushes their stomach out of their body when if it eats something bad. Rabbits eat their droppings. Rabbits eat grass. Baboons live together in troups. The starfish stomach goes out of its body and into the shellfish Behaviors Cobras puff out their necks to look bigger. Whales can talk to each other. Chameleons change colors to hide. Meercats stand guard to warn of danger. Ostriches can run 40 miles an hour. It can kick its enemies.

  31. What can we infer? Cows have four stomachs. They eat grass Ostriches have long nails. Frogs pushes their stomach out of their body when if it eats something bad. Rabbits eat their droppings. Rabbits eat grass. The starfish stomach goes out of its body and into the shellfish The cheeta has a spotted coat. Animal features…

  32. What can we infer? Cobras puff out their necks to look bigger. Whales can talk to each other. Chameleons change colors to hide. Meercats stand guard to warn of danger. Ostriches can run 40 miles an hour. It can kick its enemies. Baboons live together in troups. Animal behaviors…

  33. Inferential Thinking ABC’s of Inferring A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Reading Strategy: Inferential Thinking Animal Survival

  34. Final Product Organizer 1 1 2 1 3 4 5 6

  35. Emily Alford (847) 397-1665 ealford@ncisc.org