deconstructing discourses of widening participation quality and inequality in higher education n.
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  1. Deconstructing Discourses of Widening Participation: Quality and Inequality in Higher Education Professor Penny Jane Burke WP in the 21st century June 2010

  2. Aims • deconstruct the discourses of widening participation • draw on the conceptual tools of poststructuralism • Use examples from my empirical work

  3. Safeguarding

  4. Process of self-exclusion • Choice for the majority [of working-class students] involved either a process of finding out what you cannot have, what is not open for negotiation and then looking at the few options left, or a process of self-exclusion (Reay, David et al. 2005: 85).

  5. Docile bodies • Quality assurance is producing docile bodies as the consequences of resistance are too high. There is a powerful rhetoric of inevitability, or a TINA effect (`there is no alternative’) (Morley, 2001: 476).

  6. A new theology Quality assurance -- a ‘new theology of ‘quality, efficiency and enterprise’ in which: • there is an imperative to manage all resources as efficiently as possible, including higher education to incorporate it more fully into the polity as a key institution for national economic prosperity (Henkel, 1998, p.291).

  7. cynicism • Standardised evaluation forms modelled on customer satisfaction surveys, are now commonplace for this. A recent in-depth study (Johnson, 2000) has shown how students often view such feedback with cynicism, that it in fact undermines the communicative relationship between teachers and learners, and that far from empowering students, it serves the bureaucratic function of controlling both teachers and students (Rowland, 2002: 56).

  8. Looking for potential…

  9. Polarising discourses • Meanings are constructed through explicit or more often implicit contrast; a positive rests upon the negative of something antithetical. The normal, the worthy student and the acceptable processes of admission are legitimised by references to the abnormal, the unworthy, the unacceptable (Williams, 1997: 26).

  10. Interview questions • Who is your favourite artist/designer? Who are your design heroes? Who or what influences your work? • What galleries do you visit? What is your favourite gallery? What exhibitions have you been to lately? If you could exhibit your work in a gallery where would that be? • What is your favourite film? What films have you seen recently? What is your favourite advert? Who is your favourite director? • What books do you read? What are you reading at the moment? • What is your favourite shop? Where do you like to shop?

  11. Influenced by Hip-Hop • Interviewer: What influences your work? • Nina: I’m influenced by Hip-Hop? • Interviewer: Hip-Hop or the history of Hip-Hop • Nina: The History of Hip-Hop

  12. Critical Reflexivity • requires the individual to move beyond self-reflection, to situate her practices within wider sets of social relations, including relations of power and inequality • Equity at the centre of decision-making • move beyond individual practitioners’ to institutional practices • fully integrated into the ethos, principles and values of the institution • pay close attention to the implicit, subtle and hidden ways that exclusions and misrecognitions are unwittingly reproduced in universities