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Poetry terminology. For all your poetry needs!. Day 1: Referencing Poetry. Today we are going to learn 4 terms that will help us to talk about poetry Couplet Quatrain Verse Stanza. Big and Little. BIG:

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poetry terminology

Poetry terminology

For all your poetry needs!

day 1 referencing poetry
Day 1: Referencing Poetry
  • Today we are going to learn 4 terms that will help us to talk about poetry
    • Couplet
    • Quatrain
    • Verse
    • Stanza
big and little
Big and Little
  • BIG:
    • Stanza (#18): think of it as a chunk, or a group of lines. Look at the Poetry Intro packet: what would be a good example of a stanza?
  • LITTLE:
    • Verse (#7): a line of poetry. Look at the Poetry Intro packet: what would be a good example of a verse?
2 4 6 8 who do we appreciate
2,4,6,8 Who do we appreciate?
  • TWO:
    • Couplet (#3): Think of a couple: how many people are in a couple? Shakespeare is most famous for his use of couplets in his sonnets:

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?

Thou art more lovely and more temperate.

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,

And summer's lease hath all too short a date.

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,

And often is his gold complexion dimmed;

And every fair from fair sometime declines,

By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,

Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,

Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,

When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,

So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

how many quarters in a dollar
How many QUARTERS in a Dollar?
  • FOUR:
    • Quatrain (#4): A stanza or poem of four lines.
      • THE TYGER By William Blake

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

In the forests of the night,

What immortal hand or eye

Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies

Burnt the fire of thine eyes?

On what wings dare he aspire?

What the hand dare sieze the fire?

terms for today
Terms for TODAY 
  • Point of View (#13):
    • First Person: character in the story
    • Third Person Limited: tells about the other characters, but limits info about what ONE character sees/feels.
    • Third Person Omniscient: knows and describes what ALL CHARACTERS are thinking/feeling.
    • (ADD THIS) Third Person Objective: (camera’s eye) tells what can be seen, but does not know what characters are thinking/feeling.
last one
Last One…
  • Repetition (#14): is the simple repeating of a word, within a sentence or a poetical line, with no particular placement of the words, in order to provide emphasis.
    • HUGE impact on poem
    • Draw our attention to something which the author deems important.
on your own
ON YOUR OWN!
  • There are some terms I am hoping you will remember from our previous units. Please identify, define, or give an example of (whichever is applicable to each term) the following:
    • All sensory language terms
      • Simile
      • Metaphor
      • Personification
      • Imagery
rhyme time
Rhyme Time
  • Rhyme (#15): the similarity of ending sounds existing between two words. (Shoe/blue, red/bed).
  • Rhyme Scheme (#16): the sequence in which the rhyme occurs. (A Shakespeare sonnet rhyme scheme is ababcdcdefefgg)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? a

Thou art more lovely and more temperate. b

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, a

And summer's lease hath all too short a date. b

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, c

And often is his gold complexion dimmed; d

And every fair from fair sometime declines, c

By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed; d

But thy eternal summer shall not fade, e

Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, f

Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade, e

When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st. f

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, g

So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. g

here is what you should have filled in by now
Here is what you should have filled in by now…
  • Narrative Poetry
  • Lyric Poetry
  • Couplet
  • Quatrain
  • Verse
  • Imagery
  • Metaphor
  • Personification
  • Point of View
  • Repetition
  • Rhyme
  • Rhyme Scheme
  • Simile
  • Stanza

For Poetry!!!

loud noises
LOUD NOISES!
  • Onomatopoeia (#5):
    • When words are used

to imitate sounds.

    • “Tick-tock”
    • Swoosh! (the sound that Kobe Bryant makes on a DAILY basis )
  • Alliteration (#8): the repetition of initial consonant sounds.
  • Assonance (#9): The repetition of vowel sounds. (Usually in the middle of the word)
hyperbole 6
Hyperbole (#6)
  • An EXAGGERATION or OVERSTATEMENT

“I’m so hungry, I could eat a horse!”

The end! You should have all of your words filled in now! I’ll bet this is the best handout you have ever completed in your whole entire life and you will frame it and love it always!