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Fall 2012 Regional Outreach Meetings PowerPoint Presentation
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Fall 2012 Regional Outreach Meetings

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Fall 2012 Regional Outreach Meetings

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  1. Every Student READY Fall 2012 Regional Outreach Meetings

  2. The story of North Carolina Public Schools is one of both • Measurable Progress • and • Increasing Urgency to Improve + Δ

  3. While acknowledging our successes, we are reaching higher for our students and our state…

  4. …and that starts with what students must know and be able to do to be READY.

  5. One important aspect of our new Standard Course of Study Complex Texts

  6. Complex Texts • Literacy skills must be a focus in all content areas. Literacy Standards in Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects • The balance of text types

  7. Complex Texts • Start SimpleEvery educator can help students read and comprehend complex text by • Asking Text-based Questions • Teaching Academic Vocabulary

  8. Complex TextsText-based Questions Not Text-Dependent Text-Dependent In “Casey at the Bat,” Casey strikes out. Describe a time when you failed at something. In “The Gettysburg Address” Lincoln says the nation is dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Why is equality an important value to promote? What makes Casey’s experiences at bat humorous? “The Gettysburg Address” mentions the year 1776. According to Lincoln’s speech, why is this year significant to the events described in the speech? Students must return to the text in search of evidence

  9. Complex TextsText-based Questions Text-based Questions should be a mainstay in all classrooms, across all subjects. Kindergarten: ”With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.” 12th Grade: “Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.”

  10. Complex TextsAcademic Vocabulary itemize itemize formulate formulate relative relative dignified dignified calibrate calibrate Words that give students the ability to express themselves in subtle and precise ways and are useful across all disciplines. faltered faltered periphery periphery unabashedly unabashedly misfortune misfortune specificity vary specificity vary

  11. The central focus of READY is improving every student’s learning ... by enabling and ensuringgreat teaching.

  12. Strong Leaders A Fair Evaluation System Tools and Training toImprove Practice Improved Supply of Teachers New Standard Course of Study Balanced Assessment System New Accountability Model  Support in Low-AchievingLEAs and Schools 

  13. Vision Action

  14. Tools in the Teacher and Leader Toolbox

  15. “Teachers must …regard every imperfection in the pupil’s comprehension not as a defect in the pupil, but as a deficit in their own instruction, and endeavor to develop the ability to discover a new method of teaching.” –Leo Tolstoy

  16. Instead of saying “students can’t”, we now identify instructional strategies that demonstrate “how students can”.

  17. In a Math I classroom, a teacher seeking to help students understand rate of change, designed a lesson to have students work in groups and use the data from Hurricane Sandy’s landfall to predict the future wind speeds as the hurricane travelled across the northeast. As a result, the lesson allows students to apply content-specific skills to relevant, real-world experiences, which extends their learning.

  18. In a kindergarten classroom, a teacher provides targeted reading intervention to an individual student based on needs identified through early assessment. The same kind of instruction is occurring in all elementary schools in this district. Consequently, gaps in learning are identified and addressed in a timely manner, increasing opportunities for academic success.

  19. Remodeling EducationCareer and College Readiness  Instructional Excellence  Personalized Learning Dr. June Atkinson Superintendent of Public Instruction June’s remodeling

  20. Remodel, not tear down • Higher Expectations • Constant Improvement • Continuity of Race to the Top Work

  21. Thank You • For embracing raised expectations • For constantly improving • For providing feedback • For all the work you do on behalf of students in North Carolina

  22. PROJECTMAP Strong Leaders A Fair Evaluation System Tools and Training toImprove Practice Improved Supply of Teachers New Standard Course of Study Balanced Assessment System New Accountability Model  Support in Low-AchievingLEAs and Schools 

  23. Rebecca on standards 1-6 and the purpose of evaluation PROJECTMAP Strong Leaders A Fair Evaluation System Tools and Training toImprove Practice Improved Supply of Teachers New Standard Course of Study Balanced Assessment System New Accountability Model  Support in Low-AchievingLEAs and Schools 

  24. Rebecca on standards 1-6 and the purpose of evaluation PROJECTMAP Strong Leaders A Fair Evaluation System Tools and Training toImprove Practice Improved Supply of Teachers New Standard Course of Study Balanced Assessment System  Support in Low-AchievingLEAs and Schools Angela on the GA’s performance grades   New Accountability Model

  25. Rebecca on standards 1-6 and the purpose of evaluation PROJECTMAP Strong Leaders A Fair Evaluation System Tools and Training toImprove Practice Improved Supply of Teachers New Standard Course of Study Balanced Assessment System  Support in Low-AchievingLEAs and Schools Angela on the GA’s performance grades   New Accountability Model Question and Answer

  26. Rebecca on standards 1-6 and the purpose of evaluation PROJECTMAP Strong Leaders A Fair Evaluation System Tools and Training toImprove Practice Angela and Philip on our new tech platform and its tools for teaching Improved Supply of Teachers New Standard Course of Study Balanced Assessment System  Support in Low-AchievingLEAs and Schools Angela on the GA’s performance grades  New Accountability Model Question and Answer

  27. North CarolinaEducator EvaluationA process for professional growth

  28. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessWhy the Evaluation Process? • Assumptions • Educating students is not an easy task • We can all improve

  29. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessWhy the Evaluation Process? The reason we observe, gather student growth data, get feedback and discuss our practice is to improve the learning of our students.

  30. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessTeachers • We have a total of 6 standards in our teacher evaluation system. All standards, 1-6, are of equal value. Our goal is to use this system to: • Identify our strongest teachers and explore their methodologies, and • Support teachers who need to increase their effectiveness 4 1 2 3 5 6 Contribute to Academic Success Facilitate Learning Establish Environment Reflect on Practice Demonstrate Leadership KnowContent 7/15/2014 • page 30

  31. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessPrincipals and APs We now have a total of 8 standards in our principal and assistant principal evaluation system. All standards, 1-8, are of equal value. Our goal is use this system to: • Identify our strongest leaders and explore their methodologies, and • Support leaders who need to increase their effectiveness 4 6 1 2 3 5 7 8 Human Resource Leadership AcademicAchievement Leadership Micro Political Leadership External Development Leadership Managerial Leadership Strategic Leadership Instructional Leadership CulturalLeadership 7/15/2014 • page 31

  32. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessGoals for System Implementation • As a result of yearly evaluations, every educator will: • Identify substantive strengths in practice to build upon and share with colleagues • Identify substantive areas for improvement in practice and take steps to grow

  33. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessProcess Principals and APs Teachers

  34. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessProcess • The new evaluation process requires bravery and the ability to have challenging conversations about practice. • Bravery • to believe there are always ways to improve • to invite critical feedback • to give critical feedback

  35. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessTable Talk • Principals: • How is the new evaluation process supporting effectiveness among your teachers? • What is challenging about helping teachers grow through this process? • Teachers: • How is the new evaluation process supporting effectiveness in your work? • What is challenging about the new process?

  36. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessProcess A focus on developing an increasingly accurate understanding of the evaluation rubrics.

  37. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessProcess A clear understanding of the evaluation rubrics is key to rating accurately – not on a curve, but instead against the defined set of best practices for teachers and leaders that are identified in the rubrics.

  38. Using the NCEES rubrics requires the same kind of careful reading for evidence that the Common Core requires of students. For instance: 3 Element IIIbTeachers know the content appropriateto their teaching specialty. KnowContent • Demonstrates an appropriate level of content knowledge in the teaching specialty to which assigned. • Applies knowledge of subject beyond the content in assigned teaching specialty. Motivates students to investigate the content area to expand their knowledge and satisfy their natural curiosity.

  39. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessRatings Categories 6 1 2 3 4 5 Contribute to Academic Success Facilitate Learning Demonstrate Leadership Establish Environment Reflect on Practice KnowContent 5 Categories Not DemonstratedDeveloping Proficient Accomplished Distinguished 3 Categories Exceeded Expected Growth Met Expected Growth Did Not Meet Expected Growth 8 4 6 1 2 3 5 7 AcademicAchievement Leadership Human Resource Leadership Micro Political Leadership External Development Leadership Managerial Leadership Strategic Leadership Instructional Leadership CulturalLeadership 7/15/2014 • page 39

  40. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessEffectiveness Status After 3 Years of Growth Standards 1-5 Proficient or Higher on Standards1-5 Any Rating Lower than Proficient Accomplishedor Higher on Standards1-5 1 2 3 4 5 Facilitate Learning Establish Environment Reflect on Practice Demonstrate Leadership KnowContent And/Or And And Standard 63-year average Does Not Meet Expected Growth Meets or Exceeds Expected Growth Exceeds Expected Growth ) / 3 ) 6 6 6 + + Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

  41. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessStandard 6: Key Points 6 • Standard 6 is new and is different, but not more important than the other standards • Growth. It gives the teacher and her evaluator a look at the measured growth of her students. • Trends in Growth. EVAAS helps compare the growth of different classes and groups of students. • Limits of Standard 6. Standard 6 gives you less insight into pedagogy than Standards 1-5. Standards 1-5 suggest next steps. • Think: revise formative assessment practices, track progress more accurately, improve questioning strategies, research best practices on literacy, etc. Contribute to Academic Success

  42. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessStandard 6: Reminders 6 • StatusStandard 6 is used to determine effectiveness status only when a teacher has 3 years worth of growth data • Conservative use of growth data; certainty of growth estimate improves over time • No teacher effectiveness status until 2014-15, at the earliest • 1-5 are High StakesEvaluators will continue to place teachers on monitored or directed growth plans when they receive a Developing on any of the first 5 standards Contribute to Academic Success

  43. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessStandard 6 By 2013-14, every NC teacher will have a measure of his or her students’ growth. How?

  44. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessMeasures used to determine Standard 6 6 End of Grade or End of Course 6 Common Exams 6 6 Contribute to Academic Success Career Technical Education Assessment 6 K-3 Assessments 6 Analysis of Student Work

  45. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessMeasures used to determine Standard 6 6 End of Grade or End of Course EVAASto measure growth 6 Common Exams 6 Note: 44 CTE Assessments can use EVAAS 6 Contribute to Academic Success Career Technical Education Assessment 6 K-3 Assessments 6 Analysis of Student Work

  46. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessMeasures used to determine Standard 6 6 End of Grade or End of Course 6 Common Exams 6 Note: 79 CTE assessments will use Pre-Post 6 Contribute to Academic Success Career Technical Education Assessment PRE-POSTto measure growth 6 K-3 Assessments 6 Analysis of Student Work

  47. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessMeasures used to determine Standard 6 6 End of Grade or End of Course 6 Common Exams 6 6 Contribute to Academic Success Career Technical Education Assessment 6 K-3 Assessments EVALUATORREVIEWto measure growth 6 Analysis of Student Work

  48. See www.ncpublicschools.org/educatoreffect/ for details North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessStatus High-Level Time Line 2015-16 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 End of Grade or End of Course 2012-13 is Year One 1st Status Common Exams 2012-13 is Year One 1st Status Career Technical Education Assessment 2012-13 is Year One 1st Status K-3 Assessments 1st Status 2013-14 is Year One Analysis of Student Work 1st Status 2013-14 is Year One

  49. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessProcess NCDPI support for the Evaluation Process and Rubrics

  50. North Carolina Educator Evaluation ProcessProcess NCDPI support of Standard 6