html5-img
1 / 24

Apocalyptic Literature

Apocalyptic Literature. Religious Anthropology : February 28, 2014. Sharing Epistle Observations. Apocalyptic Literature. Apocalypse = Unveiling Hence the word Revelation What does Apocalyptic really unveil? God’s sovereignty Empire and Kingdom Revelation 4-5…. Greg Boyd Video.

afya
Download Presentation

Apocalyptic Literature

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. Content is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use only. Download presentation by click this link. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server. During download, if you can't get a presentation, the file might be deleted by the publisher.

E N D

Presentation Transcript


  1. Apocalyptic Literature Religious Anthropology: February 28, 2014

  2. Sharing Epistle Observations

  3. Apocalyptic Literature • Apocalypse = Unveiling • Hence the word Revelation • What does Apocalyptic really unveil? • God’s sovereignty • Empire and Kingdom • Revelation 4-5…

  4. Greg Boyd Video • Is our allegiance first and foremost to… • a nation and a flag, or • a King and a Kingdom. • Christian Americans vs. American Christians

  5. Apocalyptic Literature Religious Anthropology: March 3, 2014

  6. Testament of Abraham chapter 12 • Dated 1st Century BC – 2nd Century CE • Psuedonymous – “by” Abraham • As I read… • Write down things that strike you as interesting in this text. • How would you characterize this text? What adjectives would you use?

  7. 1 Enoch chapters 85-88 • Dated 2nd Century BC • Psuedonymous – “by” Enoch • As I read… • Write down things that strike you as interesting in this text. • How would you characterize this text? What adjectives would you use?

  8. Apocalypse of Peter chapters 1, 3, 5-9 • Dated 2nd Century CE (Christian Apocalyptic) • Psuedonymous – “by” Peter • As I read… • Write down things that strike you as interesting in this text. • How would you characterize this text? What adjectives would you use?

  9. Apocalyptic vs. Eschatology • Apocalyptic is a genre. • Eschatology is a field of study. • The study of last things • The study of end times

  10. Apocalypse Defined by John J. CollinsA member of the Apocalypse Group of the Society of Biblical Literature’s Genre’s Project “Apocalypse” is a genre of revelatory literature with a narrative framework, in which a revelation is mediated by an otherworldly being to a human recipient, disclosing a transcendent reality which is both temporal, insofar as it envisages eschatological salvation, and special insofar as it involves another, supernatural world.”

  11. http://www.revelation.giffmex.org/?p=71 • Apocalypses are usually pseudonymous – written as if by an ancient figure such as Enoch or Abraham. • Apocalypses are usually written from a context of oppression, persecution and despair. Many scholars use the phrase ‘resistance literature’ to describe them. • A heavenly intermediary usually appears in Apocalypses to interpret visions or reveal secret knowledge. • Apocalypses contain a sharp dualism, a contrast between the present age dominated by evil, and a coming age of change. • Apocalypses tend to be pessimistic about the possibility for positive change during the present age. What is needed is a radical divine intervention to overthrow God’s enemies and set things right. • Apocalypses are usually filled with symbolism. • Apocalypses tend to be deterministic, portraying an inescapable future, set in stone by God’s fixed calendar of events. • In apocalypses, events that are contemporary to the author are often portrayed as if they were prophesied long ago, so that what is happening in the author’s day is merely a fulfilment of what was revealed centuries before.

  12. Homework: • Threaded Discussion 12 by 9pm tonight for Extra Credit.

  13. Apocalyptic Literature Religious Anthropology: March 4, 2014

  14. http://www.revelation.giffmex.org/?p=71 • Pseudonymous – written as if by an ancient figure such as Enoch or Abraham. • Written from a context of oppression, persecution and despair. • A heavenly intermediary usually appears. • Sharp dualism between the present evil age, and a coming age of change. • Pessimistic about the possibility for positive change during the present age. • Filled with symbolism. • Tend to be deterministic, portraying an inescapable future. • Events are often portrayed as if they were prophesied long ago.

  15. Silent reading of Revelation 1 • 1:1-2, 9 – Author? • John • Which one? There were 2 Johns in Ephesus • Eusebius (2nd Century) and Dionysus (3rd Century) thought not John the Apostle b/c writing style and lack of eyewitness mention. • 1:3 – Don’t avoid this book… • 1:4-9 – It’s meant to be an encouragement.

  16. Walt Russel’s Genre I.D. • Apocalyptic – Fits the description and genre • Prophetic – Especially the letters to the 7 churches • Epistle – Letters to churches

  17. Why was it admitted into the canon? • Mystery that keeps you seeking meaning. • Everyday relevance. • Allegorical interpretation. • Why do you think this would be in vogue in the 4th century? • Remember that a preterist, futurist, or historical view hinges on the clashing of Kingdom of God and Empire.

  18. Apocalyptic Literature Religious Anthropology: March 5, 2014

  19. The primary questions of Apocalyptic - 255 • Primary: What insights into God’s ultimate triumph does this passage give us and how does it encourage us to live faithfully and courageously today in the face of opposition to and persecution of the church? • Secondary: What can we learn about where God is going to take history and glorify Himself as we see what events He will sovereignly allow at the end of the age?

  20. P258 – A guide to Revelation’s structure • Revelation 1:19 • Write therefore… • The things which you have seen (PAST) • Revelation 1 • The things which are (PRESENT) • Revelation 2-3 • And the things which shall take place after these things (FUTURE) • Revelation 4-22

  21. 4 Approaches to Interpreting Revelation • P256-257 • Allegorical • Preterist • Historical • Futurist

  22. DEBATE TIME! • Round 1: Preterist vs. Futurist • Round 2: Allegorical vs. Historical

  23. Russel’s 5 Guidelines for Revelation: p258-260 • Don’t shy away • It’s about Jesus • Live holy today for God’s future triumph • Realistic glimpse into the future • Capstone of Scripture

  24. Homework: • Study for Revelation Critical Reading Assessment • Finish Threaded Discussion by Thursday at 9pm

More Related