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    1. Quote & Unquote: Avoiding Plagiarism in a Digital Age UCI Libraries Workshop Spring Quarter, 2003 http://course.lib.uci.edu/ed/educ/quoteunquote.ppt Stephanie Davis-Kahl & Jennifer Jacobs

    3. Why Cite? Essential to establishing the validity of your argument(s); Demonstrates your knowledge of a topic/subject; Adding your words, interpretation, ideas to the existing body of knowledge about a topic; Informs and educates your readers on your research process.

    4. Citing The formal acknowledgement of your source. Must be done when either quoting or paraphrasing an author. Possible styles to follow: footnote, endnote, APA, MLA, Chicago Manual of Style More Information online at http://tutorial.lib.uci.edu/mod8/mod8d.html

    5. Quotations When using the same language the source used. Must be a faithful transcription, using brackets and ellipses if necessary. Must be cited, whether within the text or in a note.

    6. Direct Quotation Example Text Quoted: Until the late 1870s, most American food research was devoted to analyzing animal rather than human food, but by the middle of the 1880s serious work on American food was well under way, especially at Wesleyan University in Connecticut. There, applying the German techniques to American food, the chemist W.O. Atwater became convinced that American had developed wasteful and indeed dangerous food patterns, the result of abundance of the continents resources and their own conceit about economizing over food. APA style example: Harvey Levenstein. (1980). The New England Kitchen and the Origins of Modern American Eating Habits. American Quarterly, 32, 369-386. MLA style example Harvey Levenstein. The New England Kitchen and the Origins of Modern American Eating Habits. American Quarterly 32 (1980): 369-386.

    7. Paraphrasing Summarizing the ideas from the source, but using your own words and sentence structure. Must be cited, whether within the text or in a note. One exception: common knowledge.

    8. Paraphrasing Example Text: Until the late 1870s, most American food research was devoted to analyzing animal rather than human food, but by the middle of the 1880s serious work on American food was well under way, especially at Wesleyan University in Connecticut. There, applying the German techniques to American food, the chemist W.O. Atwater became convinced that American had developed wasteful and indeed dangerous food patterns, the result of abundance of the continents resources and their own conceit about economizing over food. Acceptable paraphrased text (MLA): Research done by W.O. Atwater at Wesleyan University demonstrated that Americans eating habits were harmful (Levinstein 371).

    9. Common citation confusions Do I have to cite an anonymous author? Government publications are in the public domain. Cant I use them freely? I got all my information off the Web--I dont have to worry about citation. How do I cite Scholar 2s analysis of Scholar 1s work?

    10. Citing from the Web, Part I: Websites UCI Libraries English and Comparative Literature http://www.lib.uci.edu/online/subject/engcomp.html APA: Novak, John. (2003). English & Comparative Literature. Retrieved April 14, 2003 from http://www.lib.uci.edu/online/subject/engcomp.html. MLA: Novak, John. English & Comparative Literature. 19 March 2003. University of California Irvine Libraries. 14 April 2003 <http://www.lib.uci.edu/online/subject/engcomp.html>.

    11. Citing from the Web, Part II: Full-Text Articles from Online Databases APA: Levenstein, Harvey. (1980) The New England Kitchen and the Origins of Modern American Eating Habits. American Quarterly 32(4) . Retrieved April 14, 2003, from http://www.jstor.org/jstor/. MLA: Levenstein, Harvey. The New England Kitchen and the Origins of Modern American Eating Habits. American Quarterly 32 1980: 369-386. JSTOR. UCI Libraries, Irvine, CA. April 14, 2003 <http://www.jstor.org/jstor/>.

    12. Citing Scholar 2 who is citing Scholar 1 Some considerations: Is Scholar 1 in a different academic discipline? Do you know enough about Scholar 1? Is Scholar 2 saying something original about Scholar 1? Are both scholars a part of the research trail that you need to document? To find out more about Scholar 1, do an author search in ANTPAC or an article database to find out what Scholar 1 wrote, or who else has cited Scholar 1 in their work.

    13. Citing Scholar 1 & Scholar 2: Text/Reference List A General Rule: Give the secondary source in the references list; in the text, name the original work, and give a citation for the secondary source. For example, if Scholar 1s work is cited in Scholar 2s article, and you did not read Scholar 1s original work, list the Scholar 2 article in the References. Adapted from OWL, http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_apa.html Ask for help from your instructor if you need assistance with this type of question.

    14. Preventing Plagiarism during the Research Process Document your research Record your search strategies and list the databases you used in your research Print out or email citations so you can verify sources Note publication information so citations are correct Use EndNote software to record research and help you cite correctly according to style (APA, MLA, etc)

    15. Preventing Plagiarism during the Writing Process Make an outline that shows your arguments and the quotes/paraphrases you plan to use to support your points Use quotes/paraphrases as supporting evidence to your own ideas; analysis over reporting. Ask your professor, instructor or TA for advice if you are unsure about the use of others work in your paper.

    16. Quick Recap Always cite words or ideas not your own, whether direct quotes or paraphrases Check with instructor about correct format to use Document your research to track citations and your arguments Cite because its academic courtesy, so others can see your sources.

    17. Help on the Web Writing 39C Resources site: http://www.eee.uci.edu/programs/comp/39c-student/plagiarism/plagiarismmain.htm The Paraphrasing Quiz: http://www.eee.uci.edu/faculty/strenski/research/paraphrase.html TurnItIn.com Research Resources for Students http://www.turnitin.com/research_site/e_home.html http://www.eee.uci.edu/programs/comp/39c-student/plagiarism/plagiarismmain.htm Other Sources This site is especially helpful with information on what academic writing aims to achieve, examples of plagiarism, and excellent chart on preventing plagiarism in your work: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_plagiar.html

    18. Style Guides in the Libraries Writing 39C Texts Writing from A to Z (Gateway Study Center Reserves, PE1408.W773 2003) Student Guide to Writing at UCI (Main and Science Library, PE1408.H668 1993) American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition, 2001, UCI Main Library Reference Desk, BF76.7 P83 2001. The Worlds Easiest Guide to Using the APA, 3rd edition, 2001, UCI Main Library Reference, BF76.7 P83 2001 Suppl. Modern Language Association (MLA) MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing, 2nd edition, 1998, UCI Main Library Reference Desk, PN147.G444 1998.

    19. Style Guides, Continued Council of Biology Editors (CBE) Scientific Style and Format: the CBE Manual for Authors, Editors and Publishers, 6th edition, (Science Library Reference, WZ345.S416-2 1994) Chicago Chicago Manual of Style, 2nd edition, UCI Main Library Reference, Science Library Reference, Z253.U69) Government & Legal See Introduction to Legal Citation by Peter M. Martin (Cornell Law School), at http://www.law.cornell.edu/citation. UCI Libraries Style Manuals and Writing Guides site http://www.lib.uci.edu/online/reference/stylecit.html

    20. Questions & Evaluations