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Phytoremediation of heavy metal and PAH-contaminated brownfield sites

Phytoremediation of heavy metal and PAH-contaminated brownfield sites

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Phytoremediation of heavy metal and PAH-contaminated brownfield sites

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  1. Phytoremediation of heavy metal and PAH-contaminated brownfield sites Sébastien Roy, et al. 2004 Plant and Soil 272: 277-290

  2. Background Information • Use of plants to clean up pollutants in environment • Set of technologies that use different plants for techniques • Containment, destruction, extraction, transpiration

  3. Phytoremediation Diagram

  4. Pros and Cons of Phytoremediation

  5. Goals of this paper • Assess heavy metal phytoextraction performance from alkaline soils • Assess the impact of phytoextraction plants on rhizosphere communities

  6. Materials and Methods • Soil excavation • Alkaline soils contaminated with metals and PAHs • Indian mustard, willow, and fescue • Chosen because they can extract heavy-metals and grow on the tested soils • Pot Trials • Chelating agent EDTA

  7. Materials and Methods • Heavy metal analysis • Roots and aerial • Microbial enumerations • Plate count • Community DNA extraction and DGGE • 13 samples, characterized diversity

  8. Results Indian mustard Willow Fescue Figure 1 Figure 2

  9. Results

  10. Results

  11. Results

  12. Results

  13. Discussion • Heavy metal accumulations • Preferred Harvests • Plant mixtures • Rhizosphere populations • PAH degradation • Usefulness of study for projections

  14. Conclusion • Phytoremediation • can offer a feasible alternative for restoration • can take a long time with many harvests • is an important tool for controlling contaminant migration

  15. Questions???

  16. Sources • Becker, Hank. “Phytoremediation: Using Plants to Clean Up Soils”. Agricultural Research Magazine. June 2000 Vol. 48, No. 6. http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/jun00/soil0600.htm • National Risk Management Research Laboratory, USEPA. “Introduction to Phytoremediation”. http://clu-in.org/download/remed/introphyto.pdf • Roy, Sebastien, et al. “Phytoremediation of heavy metal and PAH-contaminated brownfield sites”. Plant and Soil (2005) 272: 277-290.