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The PPS Core Curriculum in Social Studies Social Studies In-Service Session August 13 th & 14 th Heinz History Cen PowerPoint Presentation
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The PPS Core Curriculum in Social Studies Social Studies In-Service Session August 13 th & 14 th Heinz History Center. Michael Dreger, Social Studies Supervisor Anita Ravi, Social Studies Curriculum Consultant Ellen Rubinsky, Pittsburgh Arlington ALA

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slide1

The PPS Core Curriculum in

Social Studies

Social Studies In-Service

Session

August 13th & 14th

Heinz History Center

  • Michael Dreger, Social Studies Supervisor
  • Anita Ravi, Social Studies Curriculum Consultant
  • Ellen Rubinsky, Pittsburgh Arlington ALA
  • David Pilarski, Pittsburgh South Hills
  • 1
agenda day 1
Agenda Day 1
  • 8:15-8:45 – Summary of the 2007-08 Student Achievement Results
  • 8:45-9:15 – Review the Social Studies Handbook
  • 9:15-9:30- Short Break
  • 9:30-11:00-Tools, Routines and Practices that Support DL Ways of Thinking
  • 11:00-12:00 Lunch and Mingle with colleagues
  • 12:00-1:00 - 6th Grade Activity
  • 1:00-2:00- Complete the Grade 6 Unit 1 Study Guide & Discuss
  • 2:00-2:15- Short Break
  • 2:15-3:00 – 7th Grade Activity
goals for the 13 th 14 th
Goals for the 13th & 14th
  • Learn to utilize the instructional handbook to guide every day teaching
  • Understand the features of Disciplinary Literacy units of study in History/Social Studies and how they apply to the PPS core curriculum in Social Studies
  • Gain an in-depth understanding of what kinds of clues historians use to understand how people lived in the past by engaging with the instructional materials
  • To provide preliminary feed back on Units 1 & 2 of each course.
what is meant by core curriculum
What Is Meant by “Core” Curriculum?
  • The Social Studies units produced by the PPS curriculum writers ARE NOT…
    • Completely comprehensive; they do not “cover” all the content that could be covered in the designated unit of study; each module comes with a set of lessons to support student understanding of specific objectives.
  • The Social Studies units produced by the PPS curriculum writers ARE:
    • “Core;” all students are meant to have a “core” set of lessons within each unit of study that have the following characteristics:
      • Engage students in deep understanding
      • Embody the Disciplinary Literacy Principles in History
    • A perspective on a set of events, people, and content in history/Social Studies: there are many ways to teach this content. These units represent a particular pathway with particular purposes.
disciplinary literacy foundations of our work
Disciplinary Literacy: Foundations of Our Work
  • A practice-based approach to teacher professional development in history.
  • An instructional design that derives from two bodies of research:
    • Research theories and findings in the teaching and learning of history (cognitive studies)
    • Current historical scholarship (historical studies)

These two bodies of work provide tools and ideas that can be useful in understanding, reflecting on, and designing history instruction.

  • A commitment to high quality and rigorous activity for all students as embodied in the Principles of Learning.
what is disciplinary literacy in history social studies
What is Disciplinary Literacy in History/Social Studies?
  • Teaching students how to learn, think and reason within the disciplines of Social Studies (history, geography, archeology, economics)
  • Providing learning opportunities (i.e., lessons) that enable students to practice these skills and habits.
  • Enabling and empowering students to act as historians, geographers, etc.
  • Providing students with a range of sources and interpretations and teaching them how to create their own arguments (in writing, in talk) from careful analysis of these sources.
features of disciplinary literacy units of study
Features of Disciplinary Literacy Units of Study

Students are asked to:

  • Analyze different types of documents (e.g., primary sources – letters, artwork, diaries, maps, charts, graphs, etc.)
  • Understand the document itself as well as the context in which it was produced
  • Support interpretations with evidence
  • Discuss and debate interpretations with others – learn from each other
  • Recognize differing perspectives and understand that there are many “sides” to a story
the social studies instructional framework for a unit of study structure
The Social Studies Instructional Framework for a Unit of Study (Structure)
  • Unit Overview
    • A Brief description of the overall content and skills that the unit will address.
  • Overarching questions
    • These questions drive the unit: all instruction is linked to them. For each overarching question in a unit there is a corresponding module of instruction (set of lessons) within the unit plan.
  • Alignment to Standards
    • These are the PA and NCHS (National Council for History Standards), along with Content Expectations, that describe what the unit is about.

4. Unit Texts, Materials, and Resources

    • The core texts are those that are central to this unit of study and the lessons provided within it. The suggested resources are additional texts and resources that teachers may use to augment their instruction within this unit.

The above can be found on pages 8-9 In your Social Studies Handbook

the social studies instructional framework for a unit of study structure cont
The Social Studies Instructional Framework for a Unit of Study (Structure) cont.

5. Unit at a Glance

  • This provides an overview of each module within the unit. It gives the recommended pacing, the link to overarching questions/key understandings, the focus content and skills and student products related to each module within the unit. The student products may be used as formative or summative assessments throughout the unit.
  • A module is a set of related lessons that enables students to go in-depth in exploring one of the overarching questions for the unit.
  • The Unit at a Glance also lists the culminating project for the unit. The “project” will vary from unit to unit and may take the form of an essay, reflective piece, an exam, or portfolio piece.

The above can be found on pages 8-9 In your Social Studies Handbook

the social studies instructional framework for a unit of study structure cont10
The Social Studies Instructional Framework for a Unit of Study (Structure) cont.

6. Module Snapshot

  • An overview of a set of related lessons that explore one of the overarching questions for the unit. The snapshot includes:
  • Pacing: A range of days for the teaching of the module
  • Rationale: the curriculum writers’ explanation of the key features of this module and their reasoning behind the design of this particular module.
  • Objectives: What students should know and be able to do by the end of the unit.
  • Texts & Materials: A list of all materials and resources need to teach this module.
  • Instructional pathway: A sequential agenda of what lessons & activities are in the unit.
  • Assessments: A listing of the different types of student products within the unit.
  • Differentiation: Specific recommendations for engaging all students with the big ideas of the unit.

The above can be found on pages 8-9 In your Social Studies Handbook

the social studies instructional framework for a unit of study structure cont11
The Social Studies Instructional Framework for a Unit of Study (Structure) cont.

7. Detailed Lesson Plans & Student Materials

  • Detailed lesson plans are provided along with corresponding student materials. Currently, there are no corresponding times for each lesson. Some lessons may take one class period, some lessons may stretch across multiple class periods. The curriculum writing team is looking for explicit feedback from teachers. As you teach these units, please keep track of what worked for you and your students and how much time you actually spent with each activity. We will solicit your feedback throughout the school year.

The above can be found on pages 8-9 In your Social Studies Handbook

the social studies instructional framework for a unit of study routines
The Social Studies Instructional Framework for a Unit of Study (Routines)
  • Access Prior Knowledge
    • Students tackle one or more of the overarching questions for the unit via material that allows them to do 2 things:
      • Review what they already know about the topic.
      • Learn something new about that topic OR learn about that topic in a new way.
  • Engage
    • Students are taught (via modeling) how to analyze one source that will become a key source or key type of source in the learning for the unit mini-case study following the format of to-with-by.
  • Mini-Case Study
    • Students develop the “expertise” they need to fully answer the overarching questions for the unit by analyzing multiple sources related to the study of the big ideas of the unit.

4. Culminating Assessment

    • Students are supported to demonstrate their learning via an engaging assessment or project.

The above can be found on p. 10 In your Social Studies Handbook

slide13
What are the key tools, routines and social practices that support student learning in Social Studies?
  • Habits of Thinking tools that apprentice students in thinking and working as historians, geographers, and archeologists:
    • Primary source analysis
    • Art analysis
    • Artifact analysis

To Do:

  • Turn to pages 12-18 in your Social Studies handbook.
  • Read through the three tools provided.

Discuss:

  • What kinds of skills are students being apprenticed in via the use of these tools?
  • If you were in a classroom in which one of these tools was being used by the class to analyze a source or an artifact, what would you expect to see and hear?
differentiated instruction
Differentiated instruction
  • PPS Definition of Differentiated Instruction: Within the effort-based learning theory embraced by the district, DI is the deliberate effort by the teachers with administrative and district support to provide academically rigorous instruction that is responsive to the differing needs of all students.
  • Short Discussion: Within your tables/groups you will discuss ways in which you have differentiated instruction within your classroom and will report out
differentiated instruction in social studies some suggested ideas
Differentiated instruction in Social Studies some suggested ideas
  • Differentiation with difficult text:
    • “Chunking” documents allowing students to process and understand pieces of text one “chunk” at a time
    • Pull out the most relevant piece for text and focusing on these with students
    • Have students “translate” these into modern language
    • Put “simpler” text before more difficult text to build a knowledge base

Other suggestions can be found on page 20 of your handbook

differentiated instruction in social studies some suggested ideas cont
Differentiated instruction in Social Studies some suggested ideas cont.
  • Be intentional about why we are engaging in study of this topic, this text: CREATE engagement, or a reason why students should care.
  • Build Concepts over time-layering the ideas
  • Group students so they scaffold each other’s learning (mixed ability groups)

Other suggestions can be found on page 20 of your handbook

accountable talk
Accountable Talk
  • Short Discussion: Within your group discuss the topic of accountable talk. Complete the first two tasks.
  • Prior to looking in your handbook what does accountable talk mean to your group?
  • Once your group creates a definition, next look on page 23 of the handbook. Read the text and then list two ways in which your group can implement accountable talk strategies within your own classrooms.
portfolio requirements for social studies grades 6 12
Portfolio Requirements for Social Studies, Grades 6-12

The core curriculum units of study provide ample opportunities for students to write and produce multiple samples of work for inclusion in their portfolios. The basic requirements for Social Studies are:

  • Per quarter – 1 summary
  • Per semester – 1 multi-paragraph essay (one presented as a speech)

Grades 6-8 will produce extensive mid-year and end-of-year portfolio projects. Middle grades teachers will receive more specific information about this in October.

curriculum feedback survey
Curriculum Feedback Survey
  • Please refer to page 25 in the Instructional Handbook.
  • Please take the time to submit feedback once you teach each unit
  • Your feedback is critical to the revision process
social studies teaching and learning feedback tool
Social Studies Teaching and Learning Feedback Tool
  • Please refer to pages 26-29 in your instructional handbook.
  • Starting second semester this tool may be used by coaches, teachers, administrators, and supervisors during classroom visitations and learning walks. The intent is to provide feedback to inform the professional development training. This tool is not to be used in evaluative ways. This tool supports the recursive cycle of professional development and professional learning of teachers.
tools routines and practices that support dl ways of working
Tools, Routines and Practices that Support DL Ways of Working

Today, we want to focus on tools, routines and practices we will be using with our students when teaching the new curriculum. In the following lesson, we will focus on two of these tools:

  • Art Analysis Tool
  • Primary Source Analysis Tool
grade 8 u s history unit 1 module 3 lesson 2
Grade 8 U.S. History, Unit 1Module 3, Lesson 2
  • Overarching Question: What were the experiences of Africans in the English colonies and how do we know about them?
  • Objectives:
    • Explain what work and daily life were like for most slaves.
    • Evaluate the treatment of slaves on colonial plantations.
    • Analyze and draw conclusions from a primary source document.
    • Analyze and draw conclusions from a work of art.
procedure
Procedure
  • In small groups you will be assigned one of the three pictures depicting African Americans on tobacco plantations.
  • In your group you will analyze the pictures and will complete the art analysis tool.
  • Your group will be responsible to share out its findings with the whole class.
summing up
Summing Up
  • How would you describe the working conditions of enslaved African Americans after viewing this painting?
  • After completing the art analysis tool with your group please share out how you feel an activity like this one could enrich the instruction for your own students.
utilizing the primary source tool to analyze a primary source text
Utilizing the Primary Source Tool to analyze a primary source text
  • The class will be split into pairs. As a pair you will read through the text on “Slavery on a Tobacco Farm.” As you read through the document you will complete the primary source analysis tool.
  • Once complete you will share out your findings with the whole class.
summing up29
Summing Up
  • What conclusions can you draw about life on a tobacco at the time the document was written?
  • How does this add to what you learned from the paintings?
disciplinary literacy in grade 6
Disciplinary Literacy in Grade 6

Learning and Thinking like a Geographer

  • Introduced in Unit 1
  • Skills used throughout Units 1 – 8

Learning and Thinking like an Archeologist

  • Introduced in Unit 3
  • Skills used primarily in Units 3, 6, 7, 8
what habits skills do geographers use to describe the earth the five themes of geography
What habits/skills do geographers use to describe the earth?The Five Themes of Geography

Location:

  • Absolute Location

The specific location on earth that is determined by an imaginary grid of lines denoting latitude and longitude

  • Relative Location

How a place is related to other places; the interaction that occurs between and among places

Place:

The human and physical characteristics that give places meaning and character and distinguish them from other places on earth

Movement:

How people interact with other people, places, and things in the course of their everyday lives; how they travel, communicate with one another, and get products, information, and ideas that come from beyond their immediate environment

Region:

An area on the earth’s surface that is defined by certain unifying characteristics that may be physical, human, or cultural

Human/Environment Interaction:

The effects, positive and negative, that occur when people interact with their surroundings

continent challenge a group activity to introduce the geographic theme of place
Continent Challenge:A group activity to introduce the Geographic Theme of Place

For use with Module 2, Lesson #1

Continent Challenge

Names of Team Members: _____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

Continent Explored: _____________________________________

On your journey, which physical features will be obstacles (things that slow you down) and why? What forms of transportation will you use to travel through these areas?

On your journey, which physical features will be of help on your journey and why? What forms of transportation will you use to travel through these areas?

Describe the journey that your team will take as you cross your assigned continent. Include all of the physical features that you encounter. Explain how each is a help or a hindrance to you as you travel and describe the modes of transportation that you will use on your expedition. Prepare a presentation to share your findings with the class.

unit 1 web diagram
Unit 1: Web Diagram

Relative Location

Absolute Location

Location

GEOGRAPHY

The Study of Earth

habits of thinking tools review activity
Habits of thinking tools review activity
  • How did the structure of these tools support your learning?
  • What aspects of this process will you need to model for your students and why?
lesson based experience grade 6 unit 1 the five themes of geography
Lesson Based Experience: Grade 6, Unit 1: The Five Themes of Geography

Overarching Questions/Modules

A module is a set of lessons and student materials that correspond to one of the overarching questions for the unit.

Module 1: The Five Themes of Geography

  • How does a geographer use the Five Themes of Geography to study the world around us?

Module 2: Geographic theme of place

  • How are maps used to answer geographic questions.
  • How does the location of a place on the surface of the earth influence the way in which people live?

Module 3: Geographic Theme of Movement

  • How are maps used to answer geographic questions?
  • What are the effects of movement on the characteristics of a place?

Module 4: Geographic Theme of Regions

  • How are places within regions connected

Module 5:Geographic Theme of Human/Environment Interaction

  • How do human actions modify the environment?
  • How do physical characteristics of a place affect human activities?
slide36
Thinking Like A GeographerGetting StartedUnit 1, Module 1, Lesson #1Introduction to the Five Themes of Geography

Overarching Question for Module 1:

How does a geographer use the Five Themes of Geography to study the world around us?

  • Notebook Warm-Up:
  • Write a paragraph to answer the question: If you could travel to any city in the world, where would you choose to visit and why? (Encourage students to look through the atlas section of their textbooks for ideas.)
slide37
Thinking Like A GeographerGetting StartedUnit 1, Module 1Introduction to the Five Themes of Geography

Lessons 1, 2, and 3 of Module #1:

  • Introduce the role of a geographer.
  • Introduce the geographic theme of Location.
  • Teach thedistinction between absolute and relative location.
  • Provide practice with using a geographic grid.
  • Provide practice with using latitude and longitude.
  • Provide practice with using a compass rose.
thinking like a geographer getting started unit 1 module 1 the geographic theme of location
Thinking Like A GeographerGetting StartedUnit 1, Module 1The Geographic Theme of Location

From Lesson #2:

10. Have students find the absolute location (latitude and longitude) of Pittsburgh. Direct students to find the absolute locations of their selected cities and record it in their notebooks.

From Lesson #3:

  • Using a map of the United States, have students write a description of the relative location of Pittsburgh in their notebooks. (Share ideas and record responses on chart paper.)
  • The teacher should then work with the class to use the information listed to write a paragraph that describes the location of Pittsburgh, thus creating a model. The paragraph should include a description of both the absolute and relative locations of Pittsburgh.
  • Direct students to use the atlas section of their textbooks as a resource and list several ways to describe the relative location of their selected cities. The paragraph should include descriptions of both absolute and relative locations.
studying the whole unit grade 6
Studying the Whole Unit Grade 6

Next you will be provided the opportunity to analyze the student materials in all of the modules to facilitate your planning for teaching this Unit.

Procedure:

  • In your small group (3-4 people), read through the materials for the first module and discuss the Study Questions that accompany the module (handout) and make note of the big ideas and concepts embedded in this module
  • Repeat this process for modules 2 & 3, utilizing the Study Questions that accompany each module.
  • Be prepared to share your thinking with the whole group.
lesson based experience grade 7 unit 2 exploration of ancient egyptian civilization
Lesson Based Experience: Grade 7, Unit 2: Exploration of Ancient Egyptian Civilization

Overarching Questions/Modules

A module is a set of lessons and student materials that correspond to one of the overarching questions for the unit.

Module 1: Geography and natural resources of Ancient Egypt

  • How did physical geography affect the growth of Ancient Egyptian civilizations?

Module 2: Egyptians’ belief in the afterlife

  • What were the religious beliefs and values of the Ancient Egyptians?

Module 3: Accomplishments of the Ancient Egyptians

  • What historical accomplishments are the Ancient Egyptians known for and how have we learned about them?
module 1 activity 3 thinking like a geographer
Module 1, Activity #3: Thinking like a Geographer

Materials:

  • History of Our World: The Early Ages textbook, maps; Natural Resources, Farming, Importance of Agriculture and the Foreign Trade in Ancient Egypt.

Our Guiding Question (s):

1. How did physical geography affect the growth of Ancient Egyptian civilizations?

2. How did geographic features and natural resources of the Nile River Valley lead to it’s development as one of the greatest civilizations of the Ancient World?

Procedure:

  • As a whole class discuss the following questions; what are some of the basic necessities of life needed for survival? How have natural resources and landscape of a place can affect whether or not people settle there. Can people grow food there? Is there an adequate and sustainable water source.
  • In groups of 3-4 people you will each receive a copy of the Nile River Valley chart. Your group will complete the chart using information from the text, the maps, and the various handout provided to them.
  • Once your group completes the Nile River Valley charts, you will have to present it to the whole class.
nile river valley chart
Nile River Valley Chart
  • Directions: Complete the chart below using information from the text, maps and the Natural Resources, Farming, Importance of Agriculture and Foreign Trade in Ancient Egypt supplementary information handouts.
summing up43
Summing Up
  • Quick Write: On a separate sheet of paper please answer the following question: How did geographic features and natural resources of the Nile River Valley lead to it’s development as one of the greatest civilizations of the Ancient World?
  • Please be prepared to share out your responses.
reflecting on our learning today
Reflecting on our learning today
  • What are the tools, routines and/or practices that supported your learning today?
  • Which tools, routines and practices will be most supportive for your students and why?
agenda day 2
Agenda Day 2
  • 8:00-8:15 – Welcome back review agenda
  • 8:15-9:00 – Complete the grade 7 Unit 1 Study Guide
  • 9:00-10:00- Activity based on U.S. History
  • 10:00-10:15 – Short Break
  • 10:15-11:00- Complete the grade 8 Unit 2 Study Guide
  • 11:00-12:00 Lunch and Mingle with colleagues
  • 12:00-2:00 - Museum Learning and the Core Curriculum Presented by the Heinz History Center Education Staff
  • 2:00-2:15- Short Break
  • 2:15-3:00 – Provide Written Feedback on the Units of Study
goals for the 13 th 14 th46
Goals for the 13th & 14th
  • Learn to utilize the instructional handbook to guide every day teaching
  • Understand the features of Disciplinary Literacy units of study in History/Social Studies and how they apply to the PPS core curriculum in Social Studies
  • Gain an in-depth understanding of what kinds of clues historians use to understand how people lived in the past by engaging with the instructional materials
  • To provide preliminary feed back on Units 1 & 2 of each course.
studying the whole unit grade 7
Studying the Whole Unit Grade 7

Yesterday you completed an activity from Grade 7, next you will be provided the opportunity to analyze the student materials in all of the modules to facilitate your planning for teaching this Unit.

Procedure:

  • In your small group (3-4 people), read through the materials for the first module and discuss the Study Questions that accompany the module (handout) and make note of the big ideas and concepts embedded in this module
  • Repeat this process for modules 2 & 3, utilizing the Study Questions that accompany each module.
  • Be prepared to share your thinking with the whole group.
our work together in the past u s history
Our Work Together in the Past: U.S. History
  • Read and analyzed documents about the Boston Massacre
  • Viewed and discussed a slideshow showing how the 5 Themes of Geography relate to the French and Indian War (This slideshow accompanies Unit 2 on the website)
  • Read and analyzed the Emancipation Proclamation
  • Analyzed Art about Slavery on a Tobacco Farm
  • Read and analyzed a Primary Source Document about Slavery on a Tobacco Farm
our work together today
Our Work Together Today

Our Over Arching Question (s):

  • How and why did the colonists declare independence from Great Britain?

Procedure:

  • As a whole class we will read and analyze the Declaration of Independence, and create a translation of the document into modern English.
  • Use a Graphic Organizer to categorize the colonists’ complaints about the King and the British government.
studying the whole unit grade 8
Studying the Whole Unit Grade 8

Next you will be provided the opportunity to analyze the student materials in all of the modules to facilitate your planning for teaching this Unit.

Procedure:

  • In your small group (3-4 people), read through the materials for the first module and discuss the Study Questions that accompany the module (handout) and make note of the big ideas and concepts embedded in this module
  • Repeat this process for modules 2 & 3, utilizing the Study Questions that accompany each module.
  • Be prepared to share your thinking with the whole group.
reflecting on our learning today51
Reflecting on our learning today
  • What are the tools, routines and/or practices that supported your learning today?
  • Which tools, routines and practices will be most supportive for your students and why?
museum learning and the core curriculum
Museum Learning and the Core Curriculum
  • The Heinz History staff will present an overview of the museum’s educational materials and tours.
providing feedback on units 1 2
Providing Feedback on Units 1 & 2
  • Please take time to complete the feedback evaluation form with as much detail as possible.
  • To provide feedback during and/or after you’ve taught these units, please see the directions in your Social Studies handbook on page 25. Or e-mail your feedback to:

mdreger1@pghboe.net or

aravi1@pghboe.net