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Present Perfect Simple and Continuous Tenses: Form and Use

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present perfect

PRESENT PERFECT

SIMPLE/CONTINUOUS FORMS

present perfect simple
PRESENT PERFECT SIMPLE
  • FORM:

Ex: I’ve just come back from Las Vegas

slide3

PRESENT PERFECT SIMPLE

  • USES:
  • We often need to talk about things which happened or started to happen in the past and which are linked to the present or future.
    • Ex: He´s just started a new job. He walks celebrities’ dogs in Central Park.
present perfect simple4
PRESENT PERFECT SIMPLE
  • PAST EXPERIENCE
    • Lucy has read many Shakespeare´s plays. (when exactly?????)
just yet already ever never
Just,Yet, Already, Ever, Never
  • Just often emphasises the idea of close to the present
    • I've JUST spoken to Jane. She's not going to join us for supper tonight.
just yet already ever never6
Just, yet,already,ever,never
  • ALREADY (aff, int)
  • Already suggests that something has happened sooner than expected and again is linked with present time and therefore the present perfect:
    • Do you want me to make the salad for supper tonight? ~ I've already made it. It's on the table.
just yet already ever never7
Just,Yet, Already, Ever, Never
  • YET. (neg. int)
    • I don't think you've met Rachel yet, have you? ~
    • No, I haven't. I've met a lot of your friends from work, but I've not met Rachel yet.
    • ~ She's absolutely lovely. I'm sure you'll like her…
just yet already ever never8
Just,Yet, Already, Ever, Never
  • NEVER, EVER
    • Haveyoueverdriven a car with manual drive?
    • ~ No, I neverhave. I'vealwaysdrivencars withautomatic drive.
    • ~ It'snottoodifficult. You'llsoongetusedtoit …
other expressions
OTHER EXPRESSIONS
  • FOR
  • SINCE
  • SO FAR
  • RECENTLY
  • TODAY
  • THIS MONTH/WEEK/YEAR…(as long as it’s unfinished)
present continuous progressive
PRESENT CONTINUOUS/PROGRESSIVE
  • We use the present perfect continuous, however, if there is a suggestion that the activity is not yet completed
  • My brother has been painting my house
present continuous progressive11
PRESENT CONTINUOUS/PROGRESSIVE
  • We wish to emphasise the length of time it has lasted or stress the continuous, on-going nature of the activity
    • 'How long have you been waiting for this bus?‘
    • ‘I’ve been standing here for over half an hour. These buses never come.'
present perfect continuous vs present perfect simple
Present perfect continuous vs present perfect simple
  • Present P. S
    • We focus on the result. We focus on the completed action
      • Sophie has written five novels recently.
        • RESULT: FIVE NOVELS
present perfect continuous vs present perfect simple13
Present perfect continuous vs present perfect simple
  • Present P. Continuous
    • We are interested in the action itself. We don´t really care if it´s finished or not.
      • Lucy has been working on her new novel for seven months.
present perfect continuous
PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS
  • My hands are dirty. I´ve been repairing the car for 3 days.
  • Look at you!! You´re sweating. How long have you been dancing?
  • (Result / evidence of an action).
time expressions
Time expressions
  • FOR / SINCE
    • They´ve been playing tennis since 2 o´clock.
  • HOW LONG...?
    • How long have you been reading books?
  • OTHERS
    • Mary is still writing letters. She´s been writing letters all day.