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Welcome. On a sheet of paper, respond to the following question in at least a paragraph. Where were you at this time last year? Describe yourself and how you have changed since last year. (Think deeper than…well, I used to have long hair, but now it’s short.) . Agenda. Syllabus

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welcome

Welcome

On a sheet of paper, respond to the following question in at least a paragraph.

Where were you at this time last year? Describe yourself and how you have changed since last year. (Think deeper than…well, I used to have long hair, but now it’s short.)

agenda
Agenda
  • Syllabus
  • Graduation Project
  • Getting to Know You Activity
  • Student Survey
  • Reflection
graduation project
Graduation Project
  • Lab Day tomorrow
    • Cover Page
    • Title Page
    • Resumé
    • Table of contents
  • Academic Advisor Form Due January 31
  • Product Approval Form Due February 7
getting to know you
Getting to Know You
  • Think – look over the questions. Pick one or two you want to talk about. Think about how you would answer it.
  • Pair - with someone sitting next to you, discuss the questions you picked and talk about them.
  • Share – with the class
student survey
Student Survey
  • Go to my webpage
  • Click on English IV in the left column
  • Click on the survey link
  • Answer the questions completely and honestly
what type of learner are you
What Type of Learner are You?
  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Read-Write
  • Kinesthetic
slide7

Visual

They tend to be fast talkers.

They exhibit impatience and have a tendency to interrupt.

They use words and phrases that evoke visual images.

They learn by seeing and visualizing.

Auditory

They speak slowly and tend to be natural listeners.

They think in a linear manner.

They prefer to have things explained to them verbally rather than to read written information.

They learn by listening and verbalizing.

Kinesthetic

  • They tend to be slow talkers.
  • They tend to be slow to make decisions.
  • They use all their senses to engage in learning.
  • They learn by doing and solving real-life problems.
  • They like hands-on approaches to things and learn through trial and error.

Read-Write

  • They prefer for information to be displayed in writing, such as lists of ideas.
  • They emphasize text-based input and output.
  • They enjoy reading and writing in all forms.
reflection
Reflection

Where will you be at this time next year? Describe how you think your life will be different. If you don’t think it will be different, explain why.

january 24

January 24

What are your goals for this class this semester?

What is your plan to accomplish these goals?

Who is going to support you?

agenda1
Agenda
  • Table of Contents
  • Title Page
  • Cover Page
  • Resumé
january 27

January 27

What is a hero?

agenda2
Agenda
  • Hero Reaction Guide
  • Anglo History
  • Context academic vocab
  • Reading Beowulf – pg 42
  • Academic Vocab T-chart to interpret and analyze text
  • Epic Hero graphic organizer to support claims in analysis
  • Final Reflection
anglo saxons what you need to know
Anglo-Saxons – What you need to know
  • Romans leave Britain
  • Angles, Saxons, and Jutes invade
  • Bloody conflicts, ignorance, violence, barbarism
  • Angle-land
  • Fatalistic and grim world view
  • Vikings invade
  • The appeal of Christianity
anglo saxon virtues
Anglo-Saxon Virtues
  • Bravery
  • Loyalty
  • Generosity
  • Friendship
academic vocab
Academic Vocab
  • Alliteration
  • Caesura
  • Assonance
  • Scops
  • Dichotomy
  • Kenning
  • Epic poetry
  • Epic Hero
alliteration
Alliteration
  • Repetition of stressed sounds, particularly consonants
  • from the beginning of words or syllables.
  • …hoping to kill anyone he could trap on this trip to high Herot.
  • …the struggling great bodies beating at its beautiful walls …
  • …gold-covered boards grating as Grendel and Beowulf battled across them.
caesura
Caesura
  • A pause dividing each line, with each part having two accented syllables to help maintain the rhythm of the line

A powerful monster, living down

In the darkness, growled in pain, impatient

As day after day the music rang

Loud in that hall, the harp’s rejoicing

assonance
Assonance
  • Repetition of vowel sounds
  • … lying in waiting, hidden in mist, invisibly following them
  • … And wondering what the bravest of warriors could do. And sometimes they sacrificed to the
  • … sung of the ancient beginnings of us all, recalling the Almighty making the earth …
scops
Scops
  • Poet singers
dichotomy
Dichotomy
  • Opposites on the same spectrum
  • Light/Dark
  • Male/Female
  • Good/Evil
kenning
Kenning
  • Metaphor - figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily means one thing is applied to another thing to suggest a likeness between the two
  • Compound – raven-haired, ring-marked
  • Possessive – heaven’s high arch, her evil skin
  • Prepositional – frozen with fear, winters of grief, running to his doom
slide22
Epic
  • Long narrative poem
  • Praised heroic warriors
  • Recited by scops
  • Instilled cultural pride
  • History lesson
  • Moral sermon
epic hero
Epic Hero
  • Glorified
  • On a Quest
  • Ethical
  • Strong
beowulf what you need to know
Beowulf – What you need to know
  • Oldest surviving epic poem
  • 750?
  • Written in Old English
  • Originally untitled
  • Originally chanted
  • Author unknown
beowulf cheat sheet
Beowulf Cheat Sheet
  • Herot – mead-hall
  • King Hrothgar – king of the Danes
  • Grendel - monster
  • Healfdane – Hrothgar’s father
  • Higlac – Beowulf’s uncle, king of the Geats
  • Wulfgar - herald
  • Edgetho – Beowulf’s father
  • Wiglaf – Beowulf’s wing man
january 28

January 28

What does evil mean to you? Write your own definition of the word and provide some examples of real-life monsters.

agenda3
Agenda
  • Reading Beowulf – pg 50
  • Academic Vocab T-chart to interpret and analyze text
  • Epic Hero graphic organizer to support claims in analysis
  • Final Reflection
  • Homework: Cover page, title page, table of contents, and resumé
exit slip
Exit Slip

Summarize what you will take away from class today in one short sentence – 10 words or less.

january 31

January 31

Who would you consider a modern day epic hero? Why?

agenda4
Agenda
  • Finish reading Beowulf – pg 66
  • Revisit Hero Reaction Guide
  • Modern Day Epic Hero Project
  • Homework Due Tuesday:
    • Cover page, title page, table of contents, and resumé
    • Academic Advisor Form
products
Products
  • Connection to and extension of research
  • Should reflect 15 hours of work
  • Must be adequately documented with photographs, logs, letters, reflective journal entries, and other forms of documentation
  • Must involve a community component
  • Ideas
    • Write a story
    • Teach a lesson
    • Create a website
    • Interview a professional
february 3

February 3

The Anglo-Saxon virtues are bravery, loyalty, generosity, and friendship. Which do you think is the most important and why?

agenda5
Agenda
  • Reading “The Seafarer” – pg 104
  • Analyzing lines of the poem by paraphrasing, visualizing, and clarifying.
  • Finishing Modern Day Epic Hero Project
  • Final Reflection
  • Homework Due Tomorrow: Cover page, title page, table of contents, and resumé
imagery
Imagery

Find images that convey a mood of isolation.

reflection1
Reflection

What is your own definition of an epic hero?

february 4

February 4

Describe the most interesting person you have ever met?

agenda6
Agenda
  • Academic Vocab
  • Intro to the Middle Ages and Chaucer
  • Reading The Canterbury Tales Prologue - pg 144
  • Middle English Prologue Extra Credit
  • Reading and Comparing Prologue Pilgrims
    • Knight pg 146/Squire pg 147
    • Parson pg 157/Nun pg 148
  • Intro to Modern Pilgrim Assignment
  • Homework: Product Approval Form
academic vocab1
Academic Vocab
  • Frame story – joins one or more stories within a story
  • Prologue – intro to a literary work; can establish setting and give background
  • Medieval literature – ballads, romances, allegories, and moral tales; most were religious – but some dealt with love, exemplary life and behavior, and political and social issues
  • Ballads – narrative songs (tragic love, domestic conflicts, disastrous wars, shipwrecks, sensational crimes, exploits of outlaws, celebrated historical events, romantic heroes, revenge, rebellion, envy, betrayal, and superstition)
  • Allegories – narrative in which something concrete represents something abstract (Ex. Cowardly Lion; Animal Farm, Pilgrim’s Progress)
academic vocab2
Academic Vocab
  • Iambic pentameter – line of poetry with 5 meters, or 10 syllables, patter in unstressed followed by stressed syllable
  • Characterization - techniques an author uses to develop characters including description of the character’s appearance; character’s speech, thoughts, and actions; responses of other characters to the character; and direct comments from the narrator.
  • Satire - a literary work that ridicules its subject in order to make a comment or criticism about it
  • Dramatic irony – reader knows more than the character
  • Verbal irony – someone says one thing but means another
  • Situational irony – what is expected to happen is not what actually happens
who s who in the middle ages
Who’s Who in the Middle Ages
  • God – Church
  • King
  • Lords
  • Vassals
  • Knights
  • Ladies
  • Serfs
what they ate
PeasantWhat They Ate

Lord

Wine or ale

White bread

Deer, boar, and rabbits

Salmon and trout

Breakfast of white bread, meat, and wine or ale

Dinner (lunch) usually consisted of many courses

Supper similar to dinner but may include pigeon pie, woodcock, or sturgeon

  • Water, milk, or ale
  • Rye bread
  • Mutton
  • Hedgehogs and squirrels
  • Black Pudding
  • Dace, grayling, and gudgeon
  • Breakfast of bread and ale
  • Dinner of dark bread and cheese – meat rarely included
  • Supper of vegetable pottage and bread – lucky to have meat
chaucer what you need to know
Chaucer – What you need to know
  • Father of English Literature
  • First to write in the vernacular
  • Member of Parliament
  • Knight of the shire
  • Middle English
  • Modern
reflection2
Reflection

In 1809, the English poet and artist William Blake made the following observation: “Chaucer’s pilgrims are the characters which compose all ages and nations…Some of the names or titles are altered by time, but the characters themselves forever remain unaltered.” Do you agree or disagree that Chaucer’s characters seem timeless and universal? Support your opinion with details from the text and your own experiences.

february 5

February 5

It has been said that “Money is the root of all evil.”

Do you agree/disagree? Why?

agenda7
Agenda
  • Analyze modern depiction of greed
  • Read Pardoner’s Description - pg 162
  • Read Pardoner’s Tale – pg 170
  • Complete plot activity
  • Watch Pardoner’s Tale
  • Compare/Contrast Pardoner’s Tale to modern depiction
  • Final Reflection
  • Homework:
    • Product Form Due Friday
    • Modern Pilgrim Assignment Due Monday with Test
modern pilgrim assignment
Modern Pilgrim Assignment
  • Choose a modern day pilgrim
  • Decide how they should act
  • Decide how they should be critiqued
  • Describe them – include physical aspects as well
  • Write 20 lines of rhyming couplets
  • Due with your test on Monday – worth 15 points
the dark knight
The Dark Knight

The Pardoner’s Tale

reflection3
Reflection

Why is the theme of the Pardoner’s Tale still being repeated today? Describe another source (TV show, song, book, etc) where you have seen this theme repeated.

(Casino, Jerry Maguire, Slumdog Millionaire, Do You Want to be a Millionaire, The Lorax, A Christmas Carol, “Billionaire,” “Bills-Bills-Bills,” “Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems”)

february 6

February 6

Would you rather spend the rest of your life with someone who is ugly/faithful or beautiful/unfaithful? Explain why.

agenda8
Agenda
  • Decide a class goal
  • Read Wife’s Description - pg 156
  • Read Wife’s Tale – pg 184
  • Watch Wife’s Tale
  • Answer viewing and analysis questions
  • Discuss theme questions in small groups
  • Final Reflection
  • Homework:
    • Product Form
    • Modern Pilgrim Assignment
modern pilgrim assignment1
Modern Pilgrim Assignment
  • Choose a modern day pilgrim
  • Decide how they should act
  • Decide how they should be critiqued
  • Describe them – include physical aspects as well
  • Write 20 lines of rhyming couplets
  • Due with your test on Monday – worth 15 points
wife of bath viewing and analysis
Wife of Bath Viewing and Analysis
  • Wife of Bath
  • What was the knight’s crime?
  • What was his punishment?
  • According to the wife, what do women want?
  • How do you know the knight learned his lesson?
  • Did the knight get what he deserved?
  • What is the moral of the story?
reflection4
Reflection

What Women Want

What connection can you make between the wife’s tale and the movie clip? What is the meaning?

february 7

February 7

What code do you live by?

Gratitude Caring Understanding Humor Diligence Integrity Commitment Acceptance Generosity Compassion Enthusiasm Courage Discretion Sincere Humble Discipline Focus Gentleness Honesty Reliability Hope Moderation Perseverance Flexibility Respect Wisdom Spontaneity Faith Confidence Thankfulness Devotion Grace Persistence Empathy Tolerance

agenda9
Agenda
  • Grammar Diagnostic
  • Review
  • Pilgrim Characterization Chart
  • Test Study Guide
  • Homework:
    • Modern Pilgrim Assignment
modern pilgrim assignment2
Modern Pilgrim Assignment
  • Choose a modern day pilgrim
  • Decide how they should act
  • Decide how they should be critiqued
  • Describe them – include physical aspects as well
  • Write 20 lines of rhyming couplets
  • Due with your test on Monday – worth 15 points
schoology
Schoology
  • 2nd: HWJVT-K6VBR
  • 3rd: 9W4XF-ZKTS8
february 10

February 10

Test Today.

You will have a few minutes to look over your notes. Use your time wisely or lose it. I will collect the extra credit study guides before beginning the test.

day book check
Day Book Check
  • Jan 24 – Your goals this semester
  • Jan 27 – Beowulf Academic Vocab
  • Feb 3 – Analysis of Seafarer
  • Feb 4 – Pilgrim Chart
  • Feb 5 – Pardoner Storyboard
pilgrims extra credit
Pilgrims – Extra Credit

Complete the sheet on the stool based on one of the following pilgrims and receive extra credit.

  • Yeoman – pg 147
  • Monk – pg 149
  • Plowman – pg 158
  • Miller – pg 159
  • Summoner – 161
  • Friar – pg 150
  • Oxford Cleric – pg 152
february 11

February 11

Today’s Agenda

  • Resumé Tips
  • Finish Test/Completepilgrim characterization chart
  • Define AcademicVocab for new unit
  • Begin Macbeth Journal
pilgrims extra credit1
Pilgrims – Extra Credit

Complete the sheet on the stool based on one of the following pilgrims and receive extra credit.

  • Yeoman – pg 147
  • Monk – pg 149
  • Plowman – pg 158
  • Miller – pg 159
  • Summoner – 161
  • Friar – pg 150
  • Oxford Cleric – pg 152
new unit academic vocab
New Unit Academic Vocab
  • Sonnet
  • Octave
  • Sestet
  • Quatrains
  • Couplet
  • Petrarchan Sonnet
  • Shakespearean Sonnet
  • Iambic Pentameter
  • Tragedy
  • Tragic hero
  • Tragic flaw
  • Antagonist
  • Theme
  • Comic relief
  • Blank verse
  • Soliloquy
  • Aside
  • Dramatic irony
  • Foreshadowing
  • Situational irony
  • Metaphor
  • Mood
  • Imagery
  • Motifs
  • Symbols
  • Inverted sentences
  • Paradox
macbeth journal 1
Macbeth Journal 1

Write a full page.

What is your highest ambition? What are you willing to do to get there?

february 17 agree disagree

February 17Agree/Disagree

1. Behind every great man is a great woman.

2. Sometimes it is necessary to do something wrong to get what you want.

3. What goes around comes around.

4. There are circumstances or events that justify murder.

5. Success is worth any price.

6. One mistake always leads to another.

7. A guilty conscious will destroy you.

8. Greed and ambition are the same.

agenda10
Agenda
  • Review Test and Complete Objective Tracking
  • The Globe
  • England in Shakespeare’s Time Summarizing
  • Context Vocabulary Search
  • Progress Check One DUE Monday, February 24th
shakespeare quotes
Shakespeare Quotes
  • "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him". Quote (Julius Caesar Act III, Scene II).
  • "But, for my own part, it was Greek to me". - Julius Caesar Quote (Act I, Scene II).
  • "To be, or not to be: that is the question". Hamlet quote (Act III, Sc. I).
  • "This above all: to thine own self be true" Hamlet quote (Act I, Sc. III).
  • "Though this be madness, yet there is method in \'t." Haml
  • "Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow."
  • Romeo and Juliet ( Quote Act II, Scene II).
  • "What\'s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet". Romeo and
  • Juliet ( Quote Act II, Sc. II).
  • "‘T’is neither here nor there." Othello Quote (Act IV, Scene III).
  • "I will wear my heart upon my sleeve for daws to peck at". Othello Quote (Act I, Scene I).et quote (Act II, Scene II).
england in shakespeare s time
England in Shakespeare’s Time
  • Work in your groups to:
    • Read and Summarize each section of the handout
    • Skim and Identify 4 instances of unfamiliar vocabulary in Macbeth Act I – page 350
    • Cite page #, line, define, and explain in context
  • Group 1 = Scene 1 & 2
  • Group 2 = Scene 3
  • Group 3 = Scene 4
  • Group 4 = Scene 5
  • Group 5 = Scene 6 & 7
february 18

February 18

Spend 10 minutes looking up your academic vocab words, if you have not yet completed that task. The definitions should be in your daybook.

If you have completed that task, use this time to finish the context vocabulary assignment we started yesterday. Each group should write their words and definitions on the board.

agenda11
Agenda
  • Finish Context Vocabulary Search and Share Out
  • Review England in Shakespeare’s Time Summarizing
  • Macbeth Cast of Characters
  • Read Act 1 Scene 1 pg 350
  • Compare/Contrast with Audio and Visual Productions
  • Continue Reading Act I
  • Progress Check One DUE Monday, February 24th
england in shakespeare s time1
England in Shakespeare’s Time
  • Work in your groups to:
    • Read and Summarize each section of the handout
    • Skim and Identify 4 instances of unfamiliar vocabulary in Macbeth Act I – page 350
    • Cite page #, line, define, and explain in context
  • Group 1 = Scene 1 & 2
  • Group 2 = Scene 3
  • Group 3 = Scene 4
  • Group 4 = Scene 5
  • Group 5 = Scene 6 & 7
macbeth cast of characters
Macbeth Cast of Characters
  • Macbeth - a Scottish general and the thane of Glamis
  • Lady Macbeth - Macbeth’s wife
  • Banquo - a general
  • King Duncan - good King of Scotland
  • Macduff - a Scottish nobleman
  • Malcolm - son of Duncan
  • Hecate - goddess of witchcraft
  • Fleance - Banquo’s son
  • Lennox - a Scottish nobleman.
  • Ross - a Scottish nobleman.
  • Porter - drunken doorman of Macbeth’s castle.
  • Lady Macduff - Macduff’s wife
  • Donalbain - Duncan’s son and Malcolm’s younger brother.
pg 350 readers
Pg 350 - Readers
  • Narrator
  • First Witch
  • Second Witch
  • Third Witch
  • Duncan
  • Malcolm
  • Captain
  • Lady Macbeth
  • Messenger
  • Lennox
  • Ross
  • Macbeth
  • Banquo
act i scene 1
Act I Scene 1
  • Audio
  • Older Movie
  • Newer Movie
  • Movie with a twist
february 19

February 19

Pick one of the following words and explain how it could lead to a theme in Macbeth. Make a prediction on what you think will happen based on what we have read already.

Ambition, Power, Prophecy, Guilt, Supernatural, Deception

agenda12
Agenda
  • Context Vocabulary Quiz Next Week
  • Continue Reading Act 1
  • Analyze Act 1 Quotes
  • Complete Act 1 Summary
  • Subject Verb Agreement Notes and Practice
  • Progress Check One DUE Monday, February 24th
pg 360 readers
Pg 360 - Readers
  • Duncan
  • Lady Macbeth
  • Messenger
  • Macbeth
  • Banquo
reflection online
Reflection: online

Which character or characters should fear Macbeth’s ambition? Why?

subject verb agreement
Subject Verb Agreement

1. Subjects joined by and use a plural verb.

  • She and her friends are going to the mall.

2. Singular subjects joined by orornor use a singular verb.

  • The book or the pen is on the desk.

3. When a singular and plural subject are joined by orornor, the verb should agree with the closest subject.

  • The boy or his friends run every day.

4. Do not be misled by a phrase between a subject and verb. Cross it out and make the subject agree with the verb.

  • One of the boxes is open.

5. Each, Each one, either, neither, everyone, everybody, anybody, anyone, somebody, someone, and no one are singular – always – and take a singular verb.

  • Everybody knows Mr. Smith.
subject verb agreement1
Subject Verb Agreement
  • His friends or the boy run/runs every day.
  • The people who listen to that music is/are few.
  • Either is/are correct.
  • Paul and Gary has/have baseball practice.
  • Each one gives/give his all.
  • Elaine or Sophia sings/sing at the home games.
  • The team captain, as well as his players, is/are anxious.
february 20

February 20

Would Macbeth have considered murdering Duncan if the witches had not spoken to him? Explain your answer.

agenda13
Agenda
  • Identify and Define unfamiliar vocabulary in Act II
  • Read Act II pg 368
  • Analyze Act II Quotes
  • Complete Act II Summary
  • Subject Verb Agreement Notes and Practice
  • Progress Check One DUE Monday, February 24th
context vocabulary act ii pg 368
Context Vocabulary Act II – pg 368
  • On a sheet of paper to turn in TODAY
  • Skim each scene of Act II and Identify 1 instance of unfamiliar vocabulary for each scene
    • Cite page #
    • Cite line
    • Define the word
    • Explain the line now that you know the definition

*Do not use the words already defined for you in the margins.

Example

-Ravishing pg 370 line 54

-“With Tarquin’s ravishing strides, towards his design moves like a ghost.”

-delightful, entrancing

-His moves are entrancing because he is almost invisible as he moves towards his goal.

act ii pg 368 readers
Act II pg 368 - Readers
  • Banquo
  • Fleance
  • Macbeth
  • Lady Macbeth
  • Porter
  • Macduff
  • Lennox
  • Donalbain
reflection online1
Reflection - online

Can Macbeth do anything to stop his ambition?

subject verb agreement2
Subject Verb Agreement
  • Nouns such as civics, mathematics, dollars*, measles, and news use singular verbs.
    • The news is on at six.
    • Five dollars is a lot of money.
  • Nouns such as scissors, tweezers, and shears use plural verbs.
    • The scissors are dull.
subject verb agreement3
Subject Verb Agreement

3. Sentences beginning with there is or there are, the subject follows the verb.

a. There are many questions.

b. There is a question.

4. Collective nouns are words that imply more than one person but are considered singular and take a singular verb – group, team, committee, class, and family.

a. The team travels on Friday.

b. The committee decides what to purchase.

subject verb agreement4
Subject Verb Agreement

5. Expressions such as with, together with, including, accompanied by, in addition to, or as well do not change the number of the subject.

a. The President, accompanied by his wife, is traveling to India.

b. All of the books, including yours, are in that box.

february 21

February 21

When people do the wrong thing knowing it is wrong, can they stay the same or are they changed? How will not getting caught affect them psychologically? How are Macbeth and Lady Macbeth affected?

agenda14
Agenda
  • Analyze Act II Quotes
  • Complete Act II Summary
  • View Uncovering Shakespeare Macbeth
  • Macbeth Journal 2
  • Online Reflections
  • Progress Check One DUE Monday, February 24th
macbeth journal 2
Macbeth Journal 2

Think about a time when you have done or said something that “snowballed” to a point where you had no control over the situation. Write about this time and consider what you may or may not have learned from it. (This might be someone else you know if it didn’t happen to you.)

february 24

February 24

Which characters seem to be the antagonists, preparing to move against the tragic hero, Macbeth?

agenda15
Agenda
  • Progress Check One DUE Today
  • Online Reflections DUE by Wednesday
  • Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • Identify and Define unfamiliar vocabulary in Act III
  • Read Act III and paraphrase scenes with a partner
subject verb agreement notes
Subject Verb Agreement Notes
  • Plural indefinite pronouns always take plural verbs: Several, Few, Both, Many
    • Both of my parents are from Florida.
    • Many are coming to the concert.
  • Some indefinite pronouns can be either singular or plural: Some, Any, None, All, Most. Look to the antecedent to determine whether it is singular or plural.
    • Some of the test was easy.
    • Some of the tests in English are easy.
subject verb agreement practice
Subject Verb Agreement Practice
    • The class is/are reading Macbeth.
    • Seven dollars is/are sitting on the table.
    • Saturday, in addition to Sunday, is/are my favorite day of the week.
    • Civics requires/require a prerequisite.
    • Each of the boys (do/does) his own cooking.
    • There is/are many students working in the media center.
    • The tweezers is/are sharp.
  • The people across the hall, as well as the man in the next apartment, (has/have) lived in the building since the mid-1980s.
  • Either of these videos (is/are) suitable for a four-year-old.
  • Several of the students (has/have) transferred.
  • All of the exercises (seem/seems) simple.
context vocabulary act iii pg 382
Context Vocabulary Act III – pg 382
  • On a sheet of paper to turn in TODAY
  • Skim each scene of Act III and Identify unfamiliar vocabulary
    • Cite page # and line #
    • Define the word
    • Explain the line now that you know the definition

*Do not use the words already defined for you in the margins.

*2 words must come from Scenes 1-3; 2 must come from Scenes 4-6

Example

-Ravishing pg 370 line 54

-“With Tarquin’s ravishing strides, towards his design moves like a ghost.”

-delightful, entrancing

-His moves are entrancing because he is almost invisible as he moves towards his goal.

act iii
Act III
  • 5 groups – Read Act III together
  • As you read, Paraphrase/Summarize each scene using dialogue and narration
  • Basically, you are putting together a production that will take about a minute or two per scene.
  • Be prepared to perform tomorrow
reflection5
Reflection

How would you prefer to read this play? Individually, partners, small groups, whole class? Original text, Modern text, Audio Version? We have read in a variety of ways. Which suited you best and why? Explain which you prefer and why? Do you have a suggestion for a different way?

Not reading it is not an option.

february 25

February 25

A tragic hero comes to ruin due to 1) an error in judgment or 2) a weakness in character. Which of these two factors applies better to Macbeth? Explain.

agenda16
Agenda
  • Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • Finish work on Act III mini productions
  • Review Act III quotes and summary
  • Discuss Act One – Three Questions in groups
  • Macbeth Journal 3
subject verb agreement practice1
Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • A jacket or a sweater (is/are) warm enough for tonight.
  • Either the singer or the musicians (is/are) off-key.
  • Here (is/are) the books you reserved.
  • The team (has/have) won the semifinals.
  • Twenty-seven dollars (is/are) all we have raised so far.
  • To illustrate books for young readers require/requires a vivid imagination.
  • One junior, as well as four seniors, has/have been invited to attend the Milford Youth Council next month.
  • A few in my class help/helps the coach set up the bleachers.
  • None of the people in the theater was/were sitting in the first two rows.
  • Public relations and advertising is/are exciting but often stressful work.
macbeth journal 3
Macbeth Journal 3

CSI, Law and Order, NCIS – these are just a few of the popular TV shows that involve solving a mystery or finding a solution to a problem. Why are mysteries so popular?

february 26

February 26

According to one definition, knowledge is power. When might this be true? When might it not be true? Provide concrete examples from the play that prove and disprove this definition of “knowledge.”

agenda17
Agenda
  • Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • Read Act IV – pg 400
  • Review Act IV quotes and complete summary
  • Reflection
subject verb agreement practice2
Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • Look back over your notes.
  • Pick two rules to use.
  • Write out a sentence following each rule.
  • Leave the two verb choices (singular/plural) in the sentences.
  • Under each sentence explain the correct answer.
  • Do this in your daybook – notebook – English binder.
act iv pg 400
Act IV pg 400
  • Narrator
  • First Witch
  • Second Witch
  • Third Witch
  • Hecate
  • Macbeth
  • First Apparition
  • Second Apparition
  • Third Apparition
  • Lennox
  • Lady Macduff
  • Ross
  • Son
  • Messenger
  • Murderer
  • Malcolm
  • Macduff
  • Doctor
reflection6
Reflection

What seems the most tragic aspect of the play?

february 27

February 27

Without the witches’ predictions, do you think Macbeth and Lady Macbeth would have been satisfied with their place in life? Explain why.

agenda18
Agenda
  • Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • Discuss Acts One – Four in small groups
  • Read Act V – pg 418
  • Review Act V quotes and complete summary
  • Reflection
subject verb agreement practice3
Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • Write five sentences using the following criteria. All sentences must use a present tense verb.
    • Use “None” as the subject.
    • Use “Either,Or” at the beginning of the sentence. One subject must be singular. The other must be plural.
    • Start your sentence with “Tomorrow, as well as three other days this week…”
    • Use “All” as the subject.
    • Start your sentence with “Each of my friends…”
act one questions
Act One Questions
  • Who is the tragic hero? What makes him the tragic hero? What tragic decision does he make?
  • What becomes Macbeth’s primary ambition after he hears the witches’ prophesy? What event strengthens that ambition?
  • In which scene does Macbeth begin to think of murdering Duncan? How do you know?
  • Reread the aside in scene 3, lines 153-155. What does Macbeth ask Banquo to do? How does the request reflect Macbeth’s feelings? What does Banquo’s response indicate about him?
act two questions
Act Two Questions
  • What actions result from the Macbeths’ ambition? How is their ambition fulfilled?
  • Why does Macbeth say the things he does during the “dagger” soliloquy?
  • Reread Scene 1, lines 61-63. What do these lines suggest about Macbeth’s hard-heartedness in murdering Duncan? Explain.
  • In Scene 2, lines 31-32, what does Lady Macbeth tell Macbeth not to do? What does her statement reveal about her? What might it foreshadow?
act three questions
Act Three Questions
  • What is Macduff’s ambition revealed to be?
  • Reread Scene 4, lines 40-45. How does this brief exchange demonstrate dramatic irony?
  • Why are stage directions – “[To the Ghost]”-on pg 384 and 385 important?
  • Reread Scene 1, lines 87-90. What does Macbeth ask the murderers? What does their response imply about what it means to be a real “man”?
  • Does it seem that Macbeth’s ambition is producing benefits? Is Macbeth happier now that he has become king? Explain.
act iv questions
Act IV Questions
  • Which character does Macbeth focus on as his antagonist in Act Four? By the end of Act Four, what is this antagonist doing?
  • Macbeth already has reached his goal of becoming king. What is Macbeth’s major ambition in Act Four?
  • Which characters reveal ambition in Act Four? Whose ambition seems the most pure and just? Why?
  • What error in judgment seems likely to lead to Macbecth’s ruin? What tragic flaw does this error in judgment reveal?
  • Reread Scene 3, lines 205-208. As Ross shares his devasting news, what does he seem to suggest to Macduff?
macbeth journal 4
Macbeth Journal 4

“Blood will have blood.”

What is the relevance of this quote from the play to today’s world?

february 28

February 28

Put yourself in the place of either Macbeth or Lady Macbeth. What would you have done differently or similarly? Why?

agenda19
Agenda
  • Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • Read Act V – pg 418
  • Review Act V quotes and complete summary
  • Reflection
subject verb agreement practice4
Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • Write five sentences using the following criteria. All sentences must use a present tense verb.
    • Use “Most” as the subject.
    • Use “Neither, Nor” at the beginning of the sentence. The first subject must be plural. The second must be singular.
    • Start your sentence with “The teachers, in addition to the administrators…”
    • Use “Neither” as the subject.
    • Start your sentence with “Any of the paper…”
act v pg 418
Act V pg 418
  • Narrator
  • Doctor
  • Gentlewoman
  • Lady Macbeth
  • Macbeth
  • Servant
  • Seyton
  • Malcolm
  • Menteith
  • Siward
  • Messenger
  • Ross
reflection7
Reflection
  • Do you feel sorry for Lady Macbeth? Why or why not?
  • What is the irony in Scene 4 when Malcolm asks the men to cut down the tree branches? Explain.
  • Based on the ending speech, what similarities exist between Malcolm and Duncan?
slide126

March 3Look back at February 17 (the first time we looked at these). Has your opinion changed after reading Macbeth? How? Also, how can you relate at least two of these statements to our reading? Explain.

1. Behind every great man is a great woman.

2. Sometimes it is necessary to do something wrong to get what you want.

3. What goes around comes around.

4. There are circumstances or events that justify murder.

5. Success is worth any price.

6. One mistake always leads to another.

7. A guilty conscious will destroy you.

8. Greed and ambition are the same.

agenda20
Agenda
  • Subject Verb Agreement Practice
  • Macbeth Debate Prep
  • Progress Check Two DUE Friday, March 7
  • Macbeth Final Quiz Thursday
  • Journals Due Thursday
  • Subject Verb Agreement Quiz Friday
subject verb agreement5
Subject Verb Agreement
  • Choose 5 subject verb rules to focus on.
  • Create a 5 problem quiz with 5 sentences in which someone must find and underline the subject AND choose between a singular or plural verb.
  • Do NOT copy my examples.
  • Example:
    • Each of the girls on my volleyball team also like/likes to play softball.
    • Most of the stadium is/are filled with football fans.
    • Most of the students waits/wait until the last minute to complete their work.
debate prep
Debate Prep
  • Your group will have at least 5 members. Each person must speak once. A couple will speak twice.
  • Your goal will be to convince the audience either Macbeth is inherently good, Macbeth is inherently bad, Lady Macbeth is inherently good, or Lady Macbeth is inherently bad.
  • Everyone has read Macbeth, so be sure to include relevant, accurate examples from the text to support your argument. You will be judged based on your knowledge of the text, critical thinking, and persuasive abilities.
  • You MUST have a thesis statement. State your purpose for persuading us and support it. Your thesis statement should appear in your topic sentence, between each point, and in your concluding sentence.
  • Each speaker will have a 2 minute time limit. So, PRACTICE.
helpful hints
Helpful Hints
  • Avoid slang.
  • Avoid filler words – like, huh, yea
  • If you mess up, take a breath.
  • Avoid conversational tone. Sound like an authority on the subject.
  • Be confident. Don’t apologize.
  • Stand tall.
  • Be prepared.
  • Practice.
macbeth journal 5
Macbeth Journal 5

Can you think of recent leaders/celebrities whose over-reaching ambition caused their downfall? Explain.

march 5

March 5

Free Write

agenda21
Agenda
  • Subject Verb Agreement Practice – Review Practice Quiz
  • Macbeth Debate Prep
  • Returning Work
  • Progress Check Two DUE Friday, March 7
  • Subject Verb Agreement Quiz Friday
  • Macbeth Final Quiz Tomorrow
  • Journals Due Tomorrow
subject verb agreement6
Subject Verb Agreement
  • None of the team want/wants to compete at WSSU competition.
  • Either my dad or none of us is/are going to attend the school’s basketball game.
  • Each cat is/are important to Stephanie.
  • A majority of the lessons in precalculus is/are easy.
  • Either of the boys is/are going to football practice.
  • Most of the crowd is/are on their feet in the stadium.
  • Neither Adam nor his brothers is/are home.
  • Each person walk/walks to the stage.
  • The students and instructor each hopes/hope for a new facility by next year.
progress reports
Progress Reports
  • Place ALL work in the purple folder to return to me.
  • Write your name on the tab.
  • Look over your grades on your progress report and on what I return to you.
  • Write a reflection about your grades on your progress report.
  • Look at where you did well and where you could use some improvement.
  • Is this where you want to be? If it’s not, write a plan to get you where you want to be. If it is, what’s your plan to stay where you are and not get comfortable and detour?
march 6

March 6

The dead trees and peeling paint, along with the broken windows and flapping shutters, (make/makes) everyone believe that evil spirits haunt the deserted Sinclair house.

Neither of those sharks circling your boogie board (look/looks) hungry enough to bite.

Physics (has/have) proven to be Jerry’s easiest subject this semester. He brings Carol, the lab assistant, an oatmeal-raisin cookie, and as his reward, she finishes his report.

This weekend, a Great White shark, as well as a school of barracuda, (is/are) terrorizing the tourists at Daytona Beach.

Every piece of popcorn and dropped chocolate on the theater floor (has/have) stuck in the treads of Larry’s new running shoes.

agenda22
Agenda
  • Macbeth Debate
  • Macbeth Final Quiz
  • Journals Due
  • Progress Check Two DUE Tomorrow
  • Subject Verb Agreement Quiz Tomorrow
march 7

March 7

Which indefinite pronouns can be either singular or plural? Which indefinite pronouns are singular? Which indefinite pronouns are plural? Do collective nouns use a singular or plural verb? What is the rule concerning either, or/neither,nor? What makes a verb singular?

agenda23
Agenda
  • Progress Check Two DUE
  • Subject Verb Agreement Quiz
  • Macbeth Debate
  • Reflection
  • Graduation Project Check-in
reflection8
Reflection

Who won the debate? Why? Whose argument was most effective? Who had the best evidence? Who was most persuasive? Who did you find yourself agreeing with even though you thought you wouldn’t?

What can you take away from the debate that will help you with your graduation presentation?

graduation project1
Graduation Project
  • March 17 – Portfolio Lab Day
  • March 19 – Products
  • March 26 – Presentation Day
march 10

March 10

“Love is blind.” Do you agree/disagree? Why?

Think of at least one movie/song where the characters are “blinded” by their love for one another or the theme is love is blind. Describe the movie or song and how you know it is about love being blind.

agenda24
Agenda
  • Sonnet Notes
  • Paraphrase Sonnets
  • Create Visual Representations
  • Write a sonnet
acad vocab
AcadVocab
  • Sonnet – 14 line lyric poem
  • Octave – first 8 lines
  • Sestet – last 6 lines
  • Quatrains – stanzas of 4 lines
  • Couplet – 2 lines
  • Petrarchan (Italian) Sonnet – abbaabbacdcdcd
    • Octave that establishes situation - abbaabba
    • Sestet that resolves, draws conclusion about or expresses reaction to situation - cdcdcd
  • Shakespearean (English) Sonnet – ababcdcdefefgg
    • 1ST Quatrain introduces situation - abab
    • 2nd Quatrain explores the situation - cdcd
    • 3rd Quatrain usually includes a turn or shift in thought - efef
    • Couplet resolves the situation - gg
  • Iambic pentameter – line of poetry with 5 meters, or 10 syllables
sonnet paraphrase and visual
Sonnet Paraphrase and Visual
  • Sonnet Number
  • Author
  • Paraphrase the sonnet
  • Create a visual representation of the sonnet
    • Spencer
      • Sonnet 30 – pg 320
      • Sonnet 75 – pg 321
    • Shakespeare
      • Sonnet 29 – pg 328
      • Sonnet 116 – pg 329
      • Sonnet 130 – pg 330
    • Petrach
      • Sonnet 90 – pg 336
      • Sonnet 292 – pg 337
write your own sonnet
Write your own sonnet
  • Follow either the Petrarchan or Shakespearean form
  • Due Wednesday
march 11

March 11

King’s College Graduation Presentation

march 12

March 12

What is the most memorable part of yesterday’s presentation? What did you take away that will be the most helpful for you and your preparation for your presentation?

agenda25
Agenda
  • Sonnet Due
  • Review Subject Verb Quiz
  • Rhetorical Devices
  • Speech Examples
  • Speech Prep
  • Homework:
    • Create a Gmail account
    • Bring notecards Tuesday March 18
    • Unit 2 Test Wednesday March 19
    • Products due Wednesday
rhetorical devices
Rhetorical Devices
  • Analogy – a comparison between two dissimilar things to explain an unfamiliar subject in terms of a familiar one Ex: A gang of boys is like a pack of wolves.
  • Antithesis – the expression of contrasting ideas in parallel grammatical form Ex: Give me liberty, or give me death
  • Repetition – the repeated use of a word or a phrase for emphasis Ex: Let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come!
  • Parallelism – form of repetition in which grammatical pattern is repeated Ex: I have a dream.
  • Rhetorical question – a question to which no answer is expected
speech examples
Speech Examples
  • “When Life Gives You Lemons”
  • “Think About the Consequences”
  • “Dedication”
  • Extra Credit
    • View speeches
    • Complete survey
impromptu speeches
Impromptu Speeches
  • Think of at least 3 statements to make about your topic.
  • During your speech
    • Intro – tell us what you are going to say – make it interesting
    • Body – tell us – make us understand
    • Conclude – tell us what you said – make it memorable
impromptu topics
Impromptu Topics
  • The best letter of the alphabet
  • Your favorite person
  • A day to remember
  • I lost it!
  • A trip to remember
  • If I could only eat three foods forever
  • Three surprising facts about me
  • A day in my life
  • An important lesson I’ve learned
  • What I’ve learned from cartoons
  • How to be a slacker
march 13

March 13

If you did not present yesterday, choose from one of these topics and be ready to present in 5 minutes.

-tell us about your nickname

-3 uses for a pencil

-what animal would you be

-the best music

-if you were invisible

-Grab a laptop.

-Log on.

-Go to Google Chrome/Mozilla.

-Open your Google Drive.

agenda26
Agenda
  • Finish Impromptu Speeches
  • Creating Graduation Portfolios in Google Drive
  • Writing the Letter to the Judges
  • Writing the Reflection Essay
  • Homework
    • Bring notecards Tuesday March 18
    • Unit 2 Test Wednesday March 19
    • Products due Wednesday
    • Extra Credit
march 14

March 14

Rate these qualities from most important to least important when it comes to the qualities of a leader: charisma, courage, eloquence, intelligence, and morality.

What do you think is missing from the list?

agenda27
Agenda
  • Academic Vocab - metaphysical conceit and humanism
  • Reading “A Valediction Forbidding Mourning” pg 518 and ID metaphysical conceit
  • Reading “Utopia” pg 446 and ID rhetorical devices
  • Divide and Conquer
    • Ladies – Female Orations and Eve’s Apology pg 472
    • Gentlemen – Of Studies and On Marriage and Single Life pg 464
  • Homework
    • Bring notecards Tuesday March 18
    • Unit 2 Test Wednesday, March 19
    • Products due Wednesday
    • Alternate Macbeth Debate Assignment du Friday
academic vocab3
Academic Vocab
  • Metaphysical poetry – primarily devotional and often mystical in content; poets used intellect, logic, and argument to explore abstract concepts such as love and death; highly intellectual, slightly irreverent, and unconventional imagery
  • Metaphysical conceit – a type of metaphor or simile in which the comparison is unusually striking, original, and elaborate
metaphysical conceit
Metaphysical Conceit

Other artists seek success,

But she found it a deceptive goal-

A steep bridge full of pain and stress,

Hard to cross, and not worth the toll.

humanism
Humanism
  • Revival of classic literature – Greek and Roman
  • More worldly and secular
  • Anthropocentric ideas – What???
  • Regarded humans as the crown of creation
  • Help humans realize their potential and gifts
  • Concentrate on perfection of worldly life not preparation for eternal life
    • Pg 446
ladies
Ladies
  • To what do several of the speakers in “Female Orations” and the speaker in “Eve’s Apology in Defense of Women” attribute women’s weakness? What does this suggest about the likelihood of women’s position changing?
  • If these speakers could see society in the United States today, would they feel that their concerns had been addressed? Why or why not?
  • Find quotations about gender attitudes online, in magazine articles, social media, etc.
gentlemen
Gentlemen
  • In “Of Studies,” what concerns does Sir Francis Bacon express about becoming too influenced by one’s studies?
  • In “Of Marriage and Single Life,” Bacon offers the opinion that virtuous women use their goodness as an excuse to be prideful and stubborn. Do you agree or disagree with that opinion? Why?
  • Write a table of contents for one of the two Bacon essays – imagining the essays are self-help books.
march 17

March 17

Grab a laptop.

Log on.

Go to Google Chrome/Mozilla.

Open your Google Drive.

agenda28
Agenda
  • Completing Graduation Portfolios in Google Drive
  • Writing the Letter to the Judges
  • Writing the Reflection Essay
  • Peer Editing Letters and Essays
  • Homework
    • Bring notecards tomorrow
    • Unit 2 Test Wednesday
    • Products due Wednesday
march 18 vocab words find the definitions

March 18Vocab Words – Find the definitions

Renovation

Reverence

Sagacity

Scrutinize

Spurious

Prudent

Querulous

Rancorous

Reclusive

Reconciliation

agenda29
Agenda
  • Test Review
  • Grad Project Speech Prep
  • Homework
    • Products and Portfolios DUE TOMORROW
march 19

March 19

Unit 2 Test

test break down
Test Break-Down
  • Extended Response 10 points
  • Everything else 2 points
  • 1-28 = 51-78
  • 36-49 = 79-92
  • Written Response on a separate sheet
    • Pg 4 – A
    • Pg 4 – B
    • Pg 8 – C
    • Pg 8 – D
    • Pg 9 – Extended Response
march 20

March 20

What do you remember about Dr. Seuss? What is your favorite story? Why? Do you have a favorite memory about Dr. Seuss?

agenda30
Agenda
  • New AcadVocab
  • Read A Modest Proposal – pg 620
  • Letter to the Editor
  • Vocab LINCs
  • Looking Forward
    • Macbeth Debate Alternate Assignment due tomorrow
    • Presentations Wednesday March 26
    • Midterm Thursday March 27
acad vocab example 1 example 2
Acad Vocab Example 1Example 2
  • Satire – literary technique that ridicules people’s behavior or society’s institutions to bring about social reform
  • irony – double meaning; what is said is the opposite of what is meant
  • Sarcasm – mocking (You’re right on time.)
  • Parody – mocking imitation of a known person, literary work, movie, or event
  • Overstatement – exaggeration by saying more than you mean to say (3 year old artist)
  • Understatement – implying the opposite by saying less than you mean to say (It’s a little cold – when it is below 30)
letter to the editor
Letter to the Editor
  • Respond to Swift’s proposal
  • Be the voice of a parent, government official, or concerned citizen
  • Make your position clear and support it
  • Use irony to get your point across
  • Be concise
reflect
Reflect

Swift once said “I hate and detest that animal called man.” What does he mean by this? How can this relate to what we read today?

lincs
LINCS

Step 1: List the parts

Step 2: Identify a Reminding Word

Step 3: Note a LINCing Story

Step 4: Create a LINCing Picture

Step 5: Self-test

an effective reminding word
An Effective Reminding Word

EXAMPLES

NEW WORD EXAMPLE

flouritefloor

serfservant

paraffin pairs of fins

an effective reminding word1
An Effective Reminding Word

NONEXAMPLES

NEW WORD NONEXAMPLE

shivareecelebration

paramecium parapuse

crinoline crinium

march 21

March 21

Did you turn in your best work for you product/portfolio? Why/Why not? What could you do to improve?

agenda31
Agenda
  • Revising letters and products
  • Preparing speeches
  • Looking Forward
    • Presentations Wednesday March 26
    • Midterm Thursday March 27
revising hints
Revising Hints
  • No contractions
  • Single space
  • One page
  • Don’t start with “Hi, my name is…” or “I am senior at Rocky River” – we know this, man.
  • Your thesis does not need to be bold - but could be included.
  • Date should be presentation date – March 26, 2014
  • Semi-colon after greeting “Dear Review Board Members:”
  • Capitalize – Street Name, City, State, Greeting
  • Left-align everything – no paragraph indents
  • Skip one space between sections
  • Have someone else read it
march 24

March 24

If you need to finish your test, have a seat in the rows near my desk. If not, have a seat in the rows closer to the door.

agenda32
Agenda
  • Finish Unit Test
  • Speech Prep
  • Looking Forward
    • Presentations Wednesday March 26
    • Midterm Thursday March 27
march 25

March 25

Speech Prep

agenda33
Agenda
  • Speech Prep
  • Midterm Review
  • Looking Forward
    • Presentations Tomorrow
    • Midterm Thursday March 27
march 26

March 26

Speech Prep

agenda34
Agenda
  • Speech Prep
  • Midterm Review
  • Looking Forward
    • Midterm Tomorrow
march 27

March 27

Midterm

march 28

March 28

On a separate sheet of paper, write an advice letter to next year’s seniors. Share your expertise on the graduation project. What should they do? What should they not do? What would you have liked to know before starting the project?

agenda35
Agenda
  • Unit 2 Objective Tracking
  • Midterm Objective Tracking
  • Returning Work
  • Reflection
  • Viewing Wuthering Heights
objective tracking
Objective Tracking
  • 21=71
  • 22=72
  • 23=73
  • 25=75
  • 27=77
  • 4=54
  • 5=55
  • 6=56
  • 7=57
  • 8=58
  • 9=59
  • 23=73
  • 24=74
  • 26=76
  • 28=78
  • 1=51
  • 3=53
  • 10=60
  • 12=62
  • 14=64
  • 16=66
  • 2=52
  • 13=63
  • 15=65
reflection9
Reflection
  • Look over the work you have submitted this semester and the grades you have received.
  • Are you where you want to be?
  • Pick one or two grades you know you could have done better on and write down what you should have done differently.
march 31

March 31

Finish each stem

I see…

I think…

I wonder…

agenda36
Agenda
  • Intro to Gothic Literature
  • ID Gothic Elements in various mediums
  • Finish Wuthering Heights
  • Looking Forward
    • Vocab Quiz Friday – HW due
the beginning
The Beginning
  • Horace Walpole wrote The Castle of Otranto in 1765.
  • Popular in 19th Century
  • Mysterious, magical, and macabre
gothic elements
Gothic Elements
  • a castle, ruined or intact, haunted or not,
  • ruined buildings which are sinister or which arouse a pleasing melancholy,
  • dungeons, underground passages, crypts, and catacombs which, in modern houses, become spooky basements or attics,
  • labyrinths, dark corridors, and winding stairs,
  • shadows, a beam of moonlight in the blackness, a flickering candle, or the only source of light failing (a candle blown out or an electric failure),
  • extreme landscapes, like rugged mountains, thick forests, or icy wastes, and extreme weather,
  • omens and ancestral curses,
  • magic, supernatural manifestations, or the suggestion of the supernatural,
  • a passion-driven, willful villain-hero or villain,
  • a curious heroine with a tendency to faint and a need to be rescued–frequently,
  • a hero whose true identity is revealed by the end of the novel,
  • horrifying (or terrifying) events or the threat of such happenings.
slide209

“Near Hackness”

John Atkinson Grimshaw

id gothic elements in film
ID Gothic Elements in Film
  • Wuthering Heights
  • Dracula
april 1

April 1

Finish each stem

I see…

I think…

I wonder…

agenda37
Agenda
  • Subject Verb Agreement
  • Commonly Misused Words
  • Frankenstein Anticipation Guide
  • Analyzing music lyrics for themes
  • Begin reading Frankenstein
  • Finish Wuthering Heights
  • Looking Forward
    • Vocab Quiz Friday – HW due
vocab
Vocab
  • Prudent
  • Querulous
  • Rancorous
  • Reclusive
  • Reconciliation
  • Renovation
  • Reverence
  • Sagacity
  • Scrutinize
  • Spurious
subject verb refresher
Subject Verb Refresher
  • Our dog Babe, together with her seven puppies, has/have chewed all the stuffing out of the sofa cushions.
  • This weekend, a Great White shark, as well as a school of barracuda, is/are terrorizing the tourists at Daytona Beach.
  • Where is/are the bowl of squid eyeball stew and the platter of broccoli-chocolate muffins that Madison made for Elizabeth’s housewarming party?
  • Here is/are the fifty-dollar bill that I promised for pet sitting Bo-Bo, my Jack Russell terrier, this weekend.
  • Neither of my two older brothers invest/invests money wisely.
commonly misused words
Commonly Misused Words
  • Affect vs Effect
    • Affect = to influence
    • Effect = to accomplish & the result of an action
  • A lot
  • Can, May, and Will
  • Fewer or Less
    • Fewer = Can you count it?
    • Less
  • Hisself, Theirself, and Theirselves
anticipation guide
Anticipation Guide
  • Everyone has a hidden monster inside of them.
  • Isolating ourselves will magnify our problems rather than resolve them.
  • Parents/guardians have a never-ending responsibility for their children.
  • Fame and glory are worth seeking.
  • Science is better than Nature.
  • Some secrets are worth hiding.
  • What we choose to do will have an effect on other.
april 2

April 2

Who is writing the letters?

To whom is he writing? What is their relationship?

Where is the writer? Why is he there? What are his plans?

What is he feeling?

agenda38
Agenda
  • Commonly Misused Words
  • Reading Frankenstein
  • Finishing Wuthering Heights
  • Looking Forward
    • Vocab Quiz Friday – HW due
commonly misused words1
Commonly Misused Words
  • Than vs Then
    • Than is used for comparisons
    • Then tells when
  • Their, They’re, There
    • Their = possessive of they
    • They’re = they are
    • There = at that place
  • Well vs Good
    • Good = Adjective; Well = Adjective and Adverb
    • Feeling good vs Feeling well
  • Who vs Whom
    • Who = subjective; Whom = objective
  • Of vs Have
    • Would have not Would of; Could have not Could of
april 3

April 3

What Gothic elements have you seen in Wuthering Heights and Frankenstein?

agenda39
Agenda
  • Gothic Film Study Vote
  • Commonly Misused Words
  • Finish Wuthering Heights (2nd)
  • Reading Frankenstein Chapter 1-2
  • Create Open Mind Organizer
  • Looking Forward
    • Vocab Quiz Tomorrow – HW Due
gothic film study
Gothic Film Study

Movie

Show

The Haunting

The Dark Knight

Harry Potter

The Corpse Bride

Once Upon a Time

The Walking Dead

The Bates Motel

Hannibal

Supernatural

The Following

commonly misused words2
Commonly Misused Words
  • Your vs You’re
    • Your = Possessive
    • You’re = You are
  • Who, Which, That
    • Who = people
    • Which & That = Things
  • At
    • Where you at? = NO
    • Where are you? = YES
  • Off or Off of vs From
    • You did not get it OFF the internet; you got it FROM the internet.
  • Myself
    • She and I NOT She and myself
    • Could you do a favor for me? NOT Could you do a favor for myself?
open mind organizer
Open Mind Organizer
  • Draw two heads on a sheet of paper
  • One belongs to Victor Frankenstein
  • The other to Robert Walton
  • Fill each head with words, symbols, illustrations, and phrases that would be going through the mind of these characters
  • On the back, write a short explanation of what you included and why
april 4

April 4

Review your vocab words.

Quiz begins in 5 minutes.

agenda40
Agenda
  • Vocab Quiz
  • Finish Open Mind Organizer
  • Researching topics related to Frankenstein
  • Creating presentation of material
  • Gothic Mini-Movie Project
research topics
Research Topics
  • The Life of Mary Shelley
  • The Advent of Science Fiction
  • The Romantic Period
  • Victorian England
  • Women in Victorian Society
  • Prometheus
presentation options
Presentation Options
  • Children’s book
  • Poster
  • Skit
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