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Muhammad Bilal Anwar Lecturer in English FC College (A Chartered University) Lahore, Pakistan . Helpful Ideas for Learning Teaching. Teaching English to Young Learners.

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Muhammad bilal anwar lecturer in english fc college a chartered university lahore pakistan

Muhammad Bilal Anwar

Lecturer in English

FC College

(A Chartered University) Lahore, Pakistan


Helpful Ideas

for

Learning Teaching


Teaching English to

Young Learners



  • Levels of proficiency depends on many other factors: a Foreign Language (EFL) before the age of 12 or 13 years will build more proficient speakers of English.

  • type of program and curriculum;

  • number of hours spent in English class

  • and techniques and activities used.


Before we go ahead, it is necessary to know as to what is a Foreign Language (EFL) before the age of 12 or 13 years will build more proficient speakers of English. young learner?

  • Young Learners (YL) are 7-12 years old

  • And Very Young Learners (VYL) are under 7 years of age.


Helpful Ideas for Teaching English to Young Learners a Foreign Language (EFL) before the age of 12 or 13 years will build more proficient speakers of English.


1. a Foreign Language (EFL) before the age of 12 or 13 years will build more proficient speakers of English.

Supplement activities with visuals, realia, and movement.


  • Young learners tend to have short attention spans and a lot of physical energy. In addition, children are very much linked to their surroundings and are more interested in the physical and the tangible. As Scott and Ytreberg (1990) describe, “Their own understanding comes through hands and eyes and ears. The physical world is dominant at all times.”


Disciplines work on a child
Disciplines Work on a Child of physical energy. In addition, children are very much linked to their surroundings and are more interested in the physical and the tangible. As Scott and Ytreberg (1990) describe, “Their own understanding comes through hands and eyes and ears. The physical world is dominant at all times.”

  • Discipline of Society

  • Discipline of Nature

  • Discipline of Self


  • Use brightly colored visuals, toys, puppets or objects of physical energy. In addition, children are very much linked to their surroundings and are more interested in the physical and the tangible. As Scott and Ytreberg (1990) describe, “Their own understanding comes through hands and eyes and ears. The physical world is dominant at all times.”

  • Community donations for toys and objects

  • Create a“Visuals and Realia Bank”

  • Use Total Physical Response (TPR) by James Asher (1977)

  • In TPR, students listen to the teacher and physically respond to his/her instructions.


What is tpr
What is TPR? of physical energy. In addition, children are very much linked to their surroundings and are more interested in the physical and the tangible. As Scott and Ytreberg (1990) describe, “Their own understanding comes through hands and eyes and ears. The physical world is dominant at all times.”

Total Physical Response (TPR) is a method developed by Dr. James J. Asher, a professor emeritus of psychology at Sa José State University, to aid learning second languages.


  • The method relies on the assumption that when learning a second or additional language, language is internalized through a process of code breaking similar to first language development and that the process allows for a long period of listening and developing comprehension prior to production.




  • In the classroom the teacher and students take on roles similar to that of the parent and child respectively. Students must respond physically to the words of the teacher. The activity may be a simple game such as ‘Simon Says’ or may involve more complex grammar and more detailed scenarios.


What is simon says
What is SIMON SAYS? similar to that of the parent and child respectively. Students must respond physically to the words of the teacher. The activity may be a simple game such as ‘

  • Simon says is a game for three or more players (most often children). One of the people is "it" – i.e., Simon. The others must do what Simon tells them to do when asked with a phrase beginning with "Simon says". If Simon says "Simon says jump", the players must jump (players that do not jump are out). However, if Simon says simply "jump", without first saying "Simon says", players do not jump; those that do jump are out.


  • In general, it is the spirit of the command, not the actions that matters; if Simon says "Simon says touch your toes", players only have to show that they are trying to touch their toes. It is the ability to distinguish between valid and invalid commands, rather than physical ability, that matters here.


Advantages of tpr
Advantages of TPR that matters; if Simon says "Simon says touch your toes", players only have to show that they are

  • Students will enjoy getting up out of their chairs and moving around.

  • TPR is aptitude-free, working well with a mixed ability class, and with students having various disabilities.




Example of tpr
Example of TPR healthy way to help children to improve self-control and restraint of impulsive behavior.

Example - Making a Sandwich

  • slice some bread - spread butter on both slices

  • spread the butter to all corners of the bread (Teacher Joe doesn't like dry bread!)

  • put a piece of meat on one slice of bread

  • put lettuce, tomatoes and cheese on top of the meat

  • place the second slice of bread on top and close the sandwich

  • cut the sandwich in half (Teacher Joe prefers to cut diagonally - it's more artistic!)

  • take a bite - Mmmmmm!


2. healthy way to help children to improve self-control and restraint of impulsive behavior.

Involve students in making visuals and realia.






  • For Example, if the story is puppets, masks, play-do sculptures Goldilocks and the Three Bears, you may want to use puppets to help show the action of the story. To get students more excited about the story, have them make little pencil puppets of the three bears and Goldilocks before the storytelling.







3. students explain in English what they made in art class

Move from activity to activity.


Young learners have short attention spans. For ages 5–7, Keep activities around 5 and 10 minutes long. For ages 8–10, keep activities 10 to 15 minutes long.



  • Quiet/noisy exercises the activities in the column on the right side.

  • Different skills: listening/talking/reading/writing

  • Individual/ pair work/ group work/ whole class activities

  • Teacher-pupil/ pupil-pupil activities


4. the activities in the column on the right side.

Teach in themes.






5. are also effective e.g. a scientific topic can be given to improve the English language skills of the students.

Use stories and contexts familiar to students.




Why Stories? English



  • Using stories in the classroom is fun, but the activity should not be considered trivial or frivolous.

  • Story telling is fundamental to education and specifically to language teaching.

  • Reading or telling stories in a class is a natural way to learn a new language.

  • Stories can also lead to harmony, understanding, and peaceful resolution of conflict.


  • Stories from around the world are excellent to use in classroom, but the teachers also need to use the stories from students’ own culture and heritage.

  • Using local and national stories insure that the students know the background culture and may already know the story.

  • This familiarity lowers the young learners’ stress and reduces anxiety in the classroom.


1. classroom, but the teachers also need to use the stories from students’ own culture and heritage.

Stories as Culture Bearers


  • Unfortunately, radio, television, and other technologies are fast replacing the elders who, in traditional family huts, used to tell folktales and fables by the fireplace.

  • But today, parents, children, and grandchildren listening to radio or watching television.

  • In fact, very little of their heritage is being transmitted.



2. tradition of storytelling,

Stories as solutions to large classes and limited resources



3. is a major constraint.

For Speaking Skills


  • Storytelling with objects. is a major constraint.

  • Use objects such as toys, forks, cups to start the stories.

  • For example, divide the students in the groups of three to five and distribute four to five objects to each group.

  • Ask each of the group to make a story that includes all of their objects.


Storytelling with pictures. is a major constraint.

  • Use pictures in the same way as objects were used in the previous activity.

  • Distribute four to five pictures to each group.

  • Make sure each student has one picture.

  • Ask each group to make up a story that includes all the pictures.


4. is a major constraint.

For Listening Skills


  • Read or tell simple stories to the students. You can use pictures or small objects.

  • After initial storytelling, ask the learners tell the story. This technique is the most effective if it involve several students.

  • Choose one person to re-tell the story, then ask others to continue the story.

  • Let all the students tell the story unless it is finished. In short, let each student tell two or three sentences of the story.


5. pictures or small objects.

For Reading


  • Find an easy version of story that the children can read. pictures or small objects.

  • Read the story aloud the first time, or let the readers read it silently.

  • Or let the students read the story aloud with each student reading one sentence.

  • One method of introducing a story is Choral Reading, in which the teacher reads a sentence or phrase and the class repeat it.


  • Caution: After the first reading, ask comprehension questions to find out what the students understood. Help them with the parts they do not understand.

  • Important: Use the same story for several different activities. One story provides rich material for other activities, for example, discussion of values, role play, creating small playlet, even creating individual books.


6. questions to find out what the students understood. Help them with the parts they do not understand.

For Writing




6. it as one person writes it down.

Establish classroom routines in English.



  • Clap short rhythms for students to repeat. repetition of certain routines and activities. Having basic routines in the classroom can help to manage young learners.

  • Start the lesson with song or chant

  • Add classroom language to the routines as well.


7. repetition of certain routines and activities. Having basic routines in the classroom can help to manage young learners.

Use L1 as a resource when necessary.




8. translating into L1.

Bring in helpers from the community


  • If possible, bring helpers—parents, student teachers from the local university, or older students studying English—to tell a story or help with some fun activities.

  • Collaborate with the others who are studying English , studying to be English teachers, or who speak English well in order to expand the English learning community.



Activity the hand flower craft
Activity:  The Hand Flower Craft studying to be English teachers, or who speak English well in order to expand the English learning community.

This craft involves tracing the hand or doing individual handprints of each member in the family.  These handprint tracings or paint handprints are placed to form a flower.  Here are the instructions to make it.  On the materials column is the template for the leaves and stem. Have fun with this family project.


9. studying to be English teachers, or who speak English well in order to expand the English learning community.

Collaborate with other teachers in your school.







10. students.

Communicate with other TEYL professionals.





Any Questions??? helps to keep your classroom fresh with new ideas, and collaboration can help to construct new ideas and solutions to the common problems that teachers are faced with.


Thank You!!! helps to keep your classroom fresh with new ideas, and collaboration can help to construct new ideas and solutions to the common problems that teachers are faced with.


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