Happy chinese new year
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Happy Chinese New Year!. The Chinese New Year. In China, the Chinese New Year is known as the Spring Festival or Lunar New Year It's a different date every year, usually between Jan. 21 and Feb. 20 It lasts 15 days, ending on the date of the full moon

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Happy Chinese New Year!

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Happy chinese new year

Happy Chinese New Year!


The chinese new year

The Chinese New Year

  • In China, the Chinese New Year is known as the Spring Festival or Lunar New Year

  • It's a different date every year, usually between Jan. 21 and Feb. 20

  • It lasts 15 days, ending on the date of the full moon

  • It marks the end of the winter season and the beginning of the spring season


Chinese new year customs

Chinese New Year Customs

  • On Chinese New Year's Eve families get together for a reunion dinner and light firecrackers - the loud noises are supposed to scare away evil spirits

  • People clean their houses on the days leading up to Chinese New Year to sweep away bad luck and clear the way for good luck (however, they do not clean on the actual day of New Years)

  • They decorate their windows and doors with red couplets displaying themes of happiness, wealth, and longevity; they also hang lights that are similar to Christmas lights


Chinese new year customs1

Chinese New Year Customs

  • They wear red because it is associated with joy and happiness, and it is like fire which supposedly fends off bad luck

  • On New Year's Day, children greet their parents in the morning by wishing them a happy new year, and receive red envelopes containing money


New year foods

New Year Foods

  • Food plays a major role in Chinese New Year celebrations

  • Chinese people often eat “lucky” foods, which are lucky because of either their appearance or what they sound like in Chinese

  • For example, spring rolls symbolize wealth because of their resemblance to gold bars


New year foods1

New Year Foods

  • We often eat foods like chives, dumplings, fish, apples, oranges, and New Year’s cake

  • Chives (“Jiǔcài”) are supposed to stand for a long life (“Chángchángjiǔjiǔ”)

  • Dumplings (“Shuǐjiǎo”) symbolize wealth

  • Fish (“Yú”) also symbolizes wealth, because the word for fish and the word for wealth homonyms


New year foods2

New Year Foods

  • Apples (“Píngguǒ”) symbolize safety and peacefulness (“Píngpíngānān”)

  • Oranges symbolize luck

  • New Year’s cake represents achievement and promotions


New year decorations

New Year Decorations

  • Mandarin oranges

  • Pineapples

  • Carrots

  • Lanterns

  • Gold coins

  • Red paper signs

  • Firecrackers

  • Chinese Knots


Happy chinese new year

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