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How to write your medical documents?. Jun Xu, M.D., L. Ac. Medicare Initial E/M. 99201 – Usually the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor and the physician typically ■■spends 10 minutes face-to-face with the patient and/or family. E/M requires the following three key components:

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Medicare initial e m l.jpg
Medicare Initial E/M

  • 99201 – Usually the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor and the physician typically

  • ■■spends 10 minutes face-to-face with the patient and/or family. E/M requires the following three key components:

    • Problem focused history.■■

    • Problem focused examination.■■

    • Straightforward medical decision making.■■


Medicare medicare initial e m l.jpg
Medicare Medicare Initial E/M

  • 99202 – Usually the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity and the physician

  • ■■typically spends 20 minutes face-to-face with the patient and/or family. E/M requires the following three key components:

    • Expanded problem focused history.■■

    • Expanded problem focused examination.■■

    • Straightforward medical decision making.■■


Medicare medicare initial e m4 l.jpg
Medicare Medicare Initial E/M

  • 99203 – Usually the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity and the physician typically

  • ■■spends 30 minutes face-to-face with the patient and/or family. E/M requires the following three key components:

    • Detailed history.■■

    • Detailed examination.■■

  • Medical decision making of low complexity.


  • Medicare medicare initial e m5 l.jpg
    Medicare Medicare Initial E/M

    • 99204 – Usually the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity and the physician

    • ■■typically spends 45 minutes face-to-face with the patient and/or family. E/M requires the following three key components:

      • Comprehensive history.■■

      • Comprehensive examination.■■

  • Medical decision making of moderate complexity.


  • Medicare medicare initial e m elements required for each type of history l.jpg
    Medicare Medicare Initial E/MElements Required for Each Type of History

    TYPE OF HISTORYCCHPIRS P F, &/OR SH

    Problem Focused Required Brief N/A N/A

    Expanded PF Required Brief Problem Pertinent N/A

    Detailed Required Extended Extended Pertinent

    Comprehensive Required Extended Complete Complete


    A chief complaint l.jpg
    A. Chief Complaint

    • A CC is a concise statement that describes the symptom, problem, condition, diagnosis, or reason for the patient encounter. The CC is usually stated in the patient’s own words. For example, patient complains of upset stomach, aching joints, and fatigue.


    B history of present illness l.jpg
    B. History of Present Illness

    • HPI is a chronological description of the development of the patient’s present illness from the first sign and/or symptom or from the previous encounter to the present. HPI elements are:

      • Location. For example, pain in left leg;■■

      • Quality. For example, aching, burning, radiating;■■

      • Severity. For example, 10 on a scale of 1 to 10;■■

      • Duration. For example, it started three days ago;■■

      • Timing. For example, it is constant or it comes and goes;■■

      • Context. For example, lifted large object at work;■■

      • Modifying factors. For example, it is better when heat is applied; and■■

  • Associated signs and symptoms. For example, numbness.


  • C review of systems l.jpg
    C. Review of Systems

    • ROS is an inventory of body systems obtained by asking a series of questions in order to identify signs and/or symptoms that the patient may be experiencing or has experienced. The following systems are recognized:

      • Constitutional Symptoms (e.g., fever, weight loss);■■

      • Eyes;■■

      • Ears, Nose, Mouth, Throat;■■

      • Cardiovascular;■■

      • Respiratory;■■

      • Gastrointestinal;■■

      • Genitourinary;■■

      • Musculoskeletal;■■

      • Integumentary (skin and/or breast);■■

      • Neurological;■■

      • Psychiatric;■■

      • Endocrine;■■

      • Hematologic/Lymphatic; and■■

  • Allergic/Immunologic.


  • Past family and or social history l.jpg
    Past, Family, and/or Social History

    • Past history including experiences with illnesses, operations, injuries, and treatments;

    • Family history including a review of medical events, diseases, and hereditary conditions that may place him or her at risk; and

  • Social history including an age appropriate review of past and current activities.


  • Elements required for each type of examination l.jpg
    Elements Required for Each Type of Examination

    • TYPE OF EXAMINATIONDESCRIPTION

    • Problem Focused A limited examination of the affected body area or organ system.

    • Expanded Problem Focused A limited examination of the affected body area or organ system and any other symptomatic or related body area(s) or organ system(s).

    • Detailed An extended examination of the affected body area(s) or organ system(s) and any other symptomatic or related body areas(s) or organ system(s).

    • Comprehensive A general multi-system examination OR complete examination of a single organ system and other symptomatic or related body area(s) or organ system(s).


    General multi system examinations l.jpg
    General Multi-System Examinations

    • TYPE OF EXAMINATIONDESCRIPTION

    • Problem Focused Include performance and documentation of 1 - 5 elements identified by a bullet in 1 or more organ system(s) or body area(s).

    • Expanded Problem Focused Include performance and documentation of at least 6 elements identified by a bullet in 1 or more organ system(s) or body area(s).

    • Detailed Include at least 6 organ systems or body areas. For each system/area selected, performance and documentation of at least 2 elements identified by a bullet is expected. Alternatively, may include performance and documentation of at least 12 elements identified by a bullet in 2 or more organ systems or body areas.


    General multi system examinations13 l.jpg
    General Multi-System Examinations

    • Comprehensive 1997 Documentation Guidelines for Evaluation and Management Services:

    • Include at least 9 organ systems or body areas. For each system/area selected, all elements of the examination identified by a bullet should be performed, unless specific directions limit the content of the examination. For each area/system, documentation of at least 2 elements identified by bullet is expected.

    • 1995 Documentation Guidelines for Evaluation and Management Services:

  • Eight organ systems must be examined. If body areas are examined and counted, they must be over and above the 8 organ systems.


  • Slide14 l.jpg
    According to the 1997 Documentation Guidelines for Evaluation and Management Services, the 10 single organ system examinations are:

    • Cardiovascular;■■

    • Ear, Nose, and Throat;■■

    • Eye;■■

    • Genitourinary;■■

    • Hematologic/Lymphatic/Immunologic;■■

    • Musculoskeletal;■■

    • Neurological;■■

    • Psychiatric;■■

    • Respiratory; and■■

    • Skin.


    Number of diagnoses or management options l.jpg
    Number of Diagnoses or Management Options

    • The number of possible diagnoses and/or the number of management options that must be considered is based on:

      • The number and types of problems addressed during the encounter;■■

      • The complexity of establishing a diagnosis; and ■■

  • The management decisions that are made by the physician.


  • Amount and or complexity of data to be reviewed l.jpg
    Amount and/or Complexity of Data to be Reviewed

    • The amount and/or complexity of data to be reviewed is based on the types of diagnostic testing ordered or reviewed. Indications of the amount and/or complexity of data being reviewed include:

      • A decision to obtain and review old medical records and/or obtain history from sources other ■■than the patient (increases the amount and complexity of data to be reviewed);

      • Discussion of contradictory or unexpected test results with the physician who performed or ■■interpreted the test (indicates the complexity of data to be reviewed); and

  • The physician who ordered a test personally reviews the image, tracing, or specimen to ■■supplement information from the physician who prepared


  • Risk of significant complications morbidity and or mortality l.jpg
    Risk of Significant Complications, Morbidity, and/or Mortality

    • The risk of significant complications, morbidity, and/or mortality is based on the risks associated with the following categories:

      • Presenting problem(s);■■

      • Diagnostic procedure(s); and ■■

  • Possible management options.


  • The level of risk of significant complications morbidity and or mortality can be l.jpg
    The level of risk of significant complications, morbidity, and/or mortality can be:

    • Minimal;■■

    • Low;■■

    • Moderate; or■■

    • High.


    Soap notes l.jpg

    SOAP NOTES and/or mortality can be:

    A SOAP note is a documentation format employed by doctors, nurses, behavioral health counselors and others in the health-care industry. SOAP is an acronym for subjective, objective, assessment and plan. Health-care providers are encouraged to adhere to this standard to ensure consistent documentation across the industry. When SOAP notes are used, other providers, auditors or accreditation councils can easily review patients' charts and find the information that is required.


    Soap notes20 l.jpg
    SOAP NOTES and/or mortality can be:

    • Begin the SOAP note using the format desired by the organization or hospital. Most begin by listing the patient or client's name, case number, date of service and any diagnosis or procedure coding. The remainder of the SOAP note should be broken into four distinct paragraphs or sections.


    Subjective l.jpg
    Subjective and/or mortality can be:

    • The patient’s chief complaints, reports about his/her progress and the patient family’s reports about the patient are the subjective description.


    Objective l.jpg
    Objective and/or mortality can be:

    • . Objective notations are those that result from viewing the patient or client from the physicians or caregivers. They can also address physical measurements, such as body temperatures or flushed skin, pain visual analogue scale .


    Assessment l.jpg
    Assessment and/or mortality can be:

    • The assessment is the physicians or caregiver's diagnosis of the client or patient's current status. Several diagnoses can be included in the assessment.


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    Plan and/or mortality can be:

    • This will include treatment performed or medication prescribed, follow-up care and patient or client instructions.

    • For acupuncturists: you have to write which acupuncture points you used, and all the other procedures, such as cupping, heating pad, mexa, massage, etc.


    Acronyms l.jpg
    ACRONYMS and/or mortality can be:

    • AMA American Medical Association

    • CC Chief Complaint

    • CMS Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

    • CPT Current Procedural Terminology

    • E/M Evaluation and Management

    • HPI History of Present Illness

    • ICD-9-CM International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification

    • ICD-10-CM/PCS International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition, Clinical Modification/Procedure Coding System

    • PFSH Past, Family, and/or Social History

    • ROS Review of Systems


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