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Canada’s Population Growth 1925 to 2005. Trends in the Birth and Death Rates. (Making Connections [1 st ed], CIA World Factbook, & Canada Yearbook). (PF; Dec 09). Roaring 20s. (Making Connections [1 st ed], CIA World Factbook, & Canada Yearbook). (PF; Dec 09). The Roaring 20s.

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canada s population growth 1925 to 2005

Canada’s Population Growth 1925 to 2005

Trends in the Birth and Death Rates

slide3

Roaring 20s

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)

the roaring 20s
The Roaring 20s
  • After WWI, reconstruction in Europe and the jobs this created meant many were able to buy cars, radios, off-the-rack clothes (creating more jobs).
  • Many began to play the stock market and were successful (at first).
  • The result of this economic boom was an elevated birth rate.
slide6

Roaring 20s

Dirty 30s

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)

the dirty 30s
The Dirty 30s
  • The Great Depression began on Black Tuesday (Oct 29, 1929) when the stock market crashed and millions of people lost their savings and their jobs.
  • The ‘dirty’ part of the 30s came from the drought that made the economy even worse and led to dust storms in the Prairies and the loss of many farms.
  • The result was a drop in the birth rate.
slide9

Roaring 20s

Wartime Economy

Dirty 30s

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)

wartime economy
Wartime Economy
  • With WWII the government increased the size of the army (more troops, guns, airplanes, ships, boots, uniforms etc...)
  • This ended the depression by creating jobs for every man or woman who wanted one.
  • Couples who had waited got married. Those who had waited to have children, had children and the birth rate began to climb.
slide12

Baby Boom

Roaring 20s

Wartime Economy

Dirty 30s

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)

the baby boom
The Baby Boom
  • The end of WWII creates a consumer economy as factories that made weapons now make inexpenxive cars, TVs and other goods.
  • Canadian companies are (again) helping to rebuild Europe and making money doing so.
  • The booming economy means the typical family has 4 – 6 children and the birth rate remains high for 20 years (1945 – 1965).
slide15

Baby Boom

Roaring 20s

Wartime Economy

Dirty 30s

Post Baby Boom

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)

the post baby boom
The Post Baby Boom
  • The economy suffers its first recessions since WWII and many people lose their job.
  • The women’s movement and the ‘pill’ start a change in society in which planning family size becomes common.
  • The cost of raising children leads many couples to chose a smaller family size ($180 000 per child).
slide18

Baby Boom

Roaring 20s

Wartime Economy

Dirty 30s

Post Baby Boom

Changing Death Rate

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)

the changing death rate
The Changing Death Rate
  • For most of 1925 to 1995 there is a slow drop in the death rate because of;
    • Better public health (vaccinations and medicines)
    • Better medical technology (defibrillators, transplants)
    • Better diet (knowledge of healthy foods)
    • Better laws (workplace safety, drunk driving)
  • Since 1995 the Death Rate has been increasing slowly as the Wartime Babies and Baby Boomers reach their 50s and 60s and some begin to pass away.
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