Canada s population growth 1925 to 2005
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Canada’s Population Growth 1925 to 2005. Trends in the Birth and Death Rates. (Making Connections [1 st ed], CIA World Factbook, & Canada Yearbook). (PF; Dec 09). Roaring 20s. (Making Connections [1 st ed], CIA World Factbook, & Canada Yearbook). (PF; Dec 09). The Roaring 20s.

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Canada’s Population Growth 1925 to 2005

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Canada s population growth 1925 to 2005

Canada’s Population Growth 1925 to 2005

Trends in the Birth and Death Rates


Canada s population growth 1925 to 2005

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)


Canada s population growth 1925 to 2005

Roaring 20s

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)


The roaring 20s

The Roaring 20s

  • After WWI, reconstruction in Europe and the jobs this created meant many were able to buy cars, radios, off-the-rack clothes (creating more jobs).

  • Many began to play the stock market and were successful (at first).

  • The result of this economic boom was an elevated birth rate.


Canada s population growth 1925 to 2005

Roaring 20s

Dirty 30s

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)


The dirty 30s

The Dirty 30s

  • The Great Depression began on Black Tuesday (Oct 29, 1929) when the stock market crashed and millions of people lost their savings and their jobs.

  • The ‘dirty’ part of the 30s came from the drought that made the economy even worse and led to dust storms in the Prairies and the loss of many farms.

  • The result was a drop in the birth rate.


Canada s population growth 1925 to 2005

Roaring 20s

Wartime Economy

Dirty 30s

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)


Wartime economy

Wartime Economy

  • With WWII the government increased the size of the army (more troops, guns, airplanes, ships, boots, uniforms etc...)

  • This ended the depression by creating jobs for every man or woman who wanted one.

  • Couples who had waited got married. Those who had waited to have children, had children and the birth rate began to climb.


Canada s population growth 1925 to 2005

Baby Boom

Roaring 20s

Wartime Economy

Dirty 30s

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)


The baby boom

The Baby Boom

  • The end of WWII creates a consumer economy as factories that made weapons now make inexpenxive cars, TVs and other goods.

  • Canadian companies are (again) helping to rebuild Europe and making money doing so.

  • The booming economy means the typical family has 4 – 6 children and the birth rate remains high for 20 years (1945 – 1965).


Canada s population growth 1925 to 2005

Baby Boom

Roaring 20s

Wartime Economy

Dirty 30s

Post Baby Boom

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)


The post baby boom

The Post Baby Boom

  • The economy suffers its first recessions since WWII and many people lose their job.

  • The women’s movement and the ‘pill’ start a change in society in which planning family size becomes common.

  • The cost of raising children leads many couples to chose a smaller family size ($180 000 per child).


Canada s population growth 1925 to 2005

Baby Boom

Roaring 20s

Wartime Economy

Dirty 30s

Post Baby Boom

Changing Death Rate

(Making Connections [1st ed], CIA World Factbook,

& Canada Yearbook)

(PF; Dec 09)


The changing death rate

The Changing Death Rate

  • For most of 1925 to 1995 there is a slow drop in the death rate because of;

    • Better public health (vaccinations and medicines)

    • Better medical technology (defibrillators, transplants)

    • Better diet (knowledge of healthy foods)

    • Better laws (workplace safety, drunk driving)

  • Since 1995 the Death Rate has been increasing slowly as the Wartime Babies and Baby Boomers reach their 50s and 60s and some begin to pass away.


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