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Using PowerPoint Effectively – or Not. Examples and Guidelines for the effective use of PowerPoint. Slide is too busy Color not effective. Well, here’s a lot of text….

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Using PowerPoint Effectively – or Not


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    1. Using PowerPoint Effectively – or Not Examples and Guidelines for the effective use of PowerPoint • Slide is too busy • Color not effective

    2. Well, here’s a lot of text… One of the benefits of this model is that it allows us to see the importance of an integrated course and to know when we have one and when we do not. To illustrate this point, let me describe an extreme case of a un-integrated or dis-connected course. Imagine a course in which the teacher says s/he wants students to (a) “learn all the important content” and (b) “learn how to think critically about the subject.” These are the learning goals. But when you examine what actually happens in class, it is a straight lecture course (this is the “teaching/learning activity”). This creates the first problem: the teaching/learning activities are NOT aligned with the learning goals. The students might be able to learn the content from the lectures, but they definitely are not getting practice and feedback in learning how to think critically. Now notice the dilemma this teacher faces when s/he attempts to write the mid-term or final exam. S/he can legitimately ask “understand and remember” questions, i.e., content-related questions. But should s/he include thinking questions or not? If s/he does, the assessment part of the course will be properly connected to the learning goals. But the students will do poorly because they have not had the appropriate learning activities for critical thinking; hence there will also be a disconnect between the learning activities and any assessment on critical thinking.

    3. Less text, but… One of the benefits of this model is that it allows us to see the importance of an integrated course and to know when we have one and when we do not. To illustrate this point, let me describe an extreme case of a un-integrated or dis-connected course. Imagine a course in which the teacher says s/he wants students to (a) “learn all the important content” and (b) “learn how to think critically about the subject.” These are the learning goals. But when you examine what actually happens in class, it is a straight lecture course (this is the “teaching/learning activity”). This creates the first problem: the teaching/learning activities are NOT aligned with the learning goals. The students might be able to learn the content from the lectures, but they definitely are not getting practice and feedback in learning how to think critically.

    4. PowerPoint guidelines • Overall design • Use complementary colors • Contrast text with background • Don’t let the background distract • Provide harmony and balance • Use plenty of white space • Consider slide transitions

    5. PowerPoint guidelines • Overall design • Use complementary colors • Contrast text with background • Don’t let the background distract • Provide harmony and balance • Use plenty of white space • Consider slide transitions

    6. PowerPoint guidelines • Overall design - continued • Limit information on each slide • Blank the screen if it distracts from discussion • Toggle the B or W key on the keyboard • Use color to • Organize information • Enhance meaning • Avoid bells and whistles that detract from content

    7. PowerPoint guidelines • Text: Make it readable • Limit number of lines per screen • Break sentences into lists • Use phrases; omit unnecessary words • Use large size: ≥ 24 point • Use upper and lower case • Use novelty fonts sparingly

    8. PowerPoint guidelines • Text: continued • Reveal points as you cover them • Animate text to give visual cues • e.g., one contrasting view • e.g., another contrasting view • e.g., up • or down • e.g., out of a picture • Be consistent with your animations

    9. PowerPoint guidelines • Use visuals where appropriate • Images: See CELT or Google images • http://www.ipfw.edu/celt/ • Charts: import or use PowerPoint built-in charting • Animation: use PowerPoint or Flash (see CELT) • Videos: insert or link to external source – e.g., YouTube • Concept mapping: see CELT

    10. PowerPoint guidelines • Some examples…

    11. Premise: Both as individuals and as a species, humans are fundamentally social.

    12. Prehistoric evidence • Law of survival on the savannah: “There is safety in numbers.”

    13. n (n-1) 2

    14. Stages of Primary Socialization

    15. Stages of Primary Socialization

    16. Stages of Primary Socialization

    17. Merton’s Typology of Prejudice & Discrimination Discriminates? Yes No Yes Prejudiced? No

    18. Merton’s Typology of Prejudice & Discrimination Discriminates? Yes No Yes Prejudiced? Unprejudiced Nondiscriminator No

    19. Merton’s Typology of Prejudice & Discrimination Discriminates? Yes No Prejudiced Discriminator Yes Prejudiced? Unprejudiced Nondiscriminator No

    20. Merton’s Typology of Prejudice & Discrimination Discriminates? Yes No Prejudiced Discriminator Prejudiced Nondiscriminator Yes Prejudiced? Unprejudiced Nondiscriminator No

    21. Merton’s Typology of Prejudice & Discrimination Discriminates? Yes No Prejudiced Discriminator Prejudiced Nondiscriminator Yes Prejudiced? Unprejudiced Discriminator Unprejudiced Nondiscriminator No

    22. CANALS More immigration from Europe Chinese Hispanic colonization Native removal