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What’s New in the Energy Volume

What’s New in the Energy Volume

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What’s New in the Energy Volume

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  1. What’s New in the Energy Volume IPCC 2006 Guidelines Bonn, 18 may 2006 Tinus PullesTNO, Netherlands

  2. Overview • No “real” changes since the revised 1996 Guidelines • What’s new? • Clear separation of Sectoral Approach and Reference Approach • Clear treatment of non-energy use of fuels • New chapter on CO2 Capture and Storage • Methods for abandoned coal mines • New methodologies and emission factors to reflect developing country circumstances as well • Improved decision trees facilitating more accurate emission estimation • Uncertainty information for all default values

  3. Energy sector overview The energy sector comprises: • fugitive emissions during exploration, exploitation of primary energy sources, • conversion of primary energy sources into more useable energy forms in refineries and power plants • transmission and distribution of fuels • use of fuels in stationary and mobile applications.

  4. Uncertainty information Uncertainty Point value

  5. “Sectoral Approach” vs “Reference Approach” Effort Error

  6. Non-Energy use of Fuels • By definition: Non-Energy Use is not dealt with in “Energy” but in “Industrial Processes and Product Use”. • Sectoral Approach uses “Fuel Combusted”. • A correction for Non-Energy Use is implemented in the Reference Approach to deal with the carbon stored in products • The 2006GLs would help segregate energy and non-energy emissions from sectors such as iron and steel.

  7. CO2 Capture and Storage Stationary Combustion New Chapter IPPU

  8. CO2 Capture and (Transport &) Storage

  9. Abandoned Coal Mines • Closed, or abandoned, underground coal mines may continue to be a source of greenhouse gas emissions for some time; • Tier 1 and Tier 2 methods, based on a database of abandoned mines are provided and default emisison factors are given.

  10. Thank you Dr. Tinus Pulles TNO, the Netherlands Tinus.Pulles@tno.nl phone: +31 55 549 3762