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Splash Screen

Splash Screen

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Splash Screen

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  1. Splash Screen

  2. Chapter Introduction Section 1The President andVice President Section 2The President’s Job Section 3Making Foreign Policy Section 4Presidential Advisers and Executive Agencies Review to Learn Chapter Assessment Contents Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slides.

  3. Chapter Overview Chapter Intro 1 In Chapter 7 you examine the executive branch. Section 1 covers presidential elections, requirements for office, and rules of succession. Section 2 identifies powers and roles of the president. Section3 discusses U.S. foreign policy goals and the president’s role in achieving them. Section 4 focuses on the federal bureaucracy.

  4. Chapter Objectives Chapter Intro 2 After studying this chapter, you will be able to: • Explain the constitutional provision for the presidency. • Examine the duties of the president. • Describe the relationship between the presidency and foreign policy. • Describe the federal bureaucracy. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

  5. Chapter Intro 3 Click the Speaker button to replay the audio.

  6. End of Intro Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide.

  7. Guide to Reading Main Idea Section 1-1 Every four years, electors selected by popular vote cast their ballots for president and vice president, whose terms of office are established in the United States Constitution. Key Terms • Electoral College • elector Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  8. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Section 1-2 Categorizing Information As you read, categorize information by completing a chart like the one on page 166 of your textbook with information about the U.S. presidency. Read to Learn • What qualifications are needed to be president? • How are presidents elected? • What are the rules of presidential succession? Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  9. President Truman Section 1-3 Click the Speaker button to replay the audio.

  10. Qualifications for President Section 1-4 • The president heads the executive branch–the top political job in the country and possibly the world. • George Washington was the first to hold the office. • To become president, a person must be: (1) at least 35, (2) a native-born American citizen, and (3) a resident of the United States for at least 14 years. (pages 166–167) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  11. Qualifications for President (cont.) Section 1-5 • So far, every U.S. president has been a white male. • All but one has been Protestant Christian. • Most have had a college education. • Many were lawyers. • Most came from states with large populations. (pages 166–167) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  12. Qualifications for President (cont.) Section 1-6 • Things are changing. • In recent decades, we’ve had a Catholic president (John F. Kennedy), a female vice-presidential candidate (Geraldine Ferraro), an African American contender for the Democratic nomination for president (Jesse Jackson), and a Jewish candidate for vice president (Joseph Lieberman). (pages 166–167) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  13. Qualifications for President (cont.) Section 1-7 The president of the United States is generally considered to hold the most important job in the world. Why? The job of U.S. president is generally considered the most important in the world because of the power and global influence of the United States. (pages 166–167) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  14. Electing a President Section 1-8 • Presidential elections take place every four years in years evenly divisible by 4. • The Constitution set up an indirect method of election called the Electoral College. • By marking their ballots for a particular candidate, voters are actually selecting their state’s electors. • The electors are pledged to vote for the chosen candidate. (page 167) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  15. Electing a President (cont.) Section 1-9 • Each state has as many electoral votes as the total of its members in Congress. • This means that states with larger populations have more electoral votes. • In almost all states, the winning candidate receives all the electoral votes, even if the person wins by only a small majority. • As a result, candidates focus their campaign on states with the most electoral votes. • It takes 270 of the 538 electoral votes to win. (page 167) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  16. Electing a President (cont.) Section 1-10 • The media announces the winner the evening of the election. • However, the outcome is not official until the Electoral College casts ballots and Congress counts them. (page 167) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  17. Electing a President (cont.) Section 1-11 Your ballot for president will show the names of all the candidates. When you select one, are you voting directly for that person? Explain. No. When you vote for a candidate, you are actually voting for a list of presidential electors pledged to that candidate. (page 167) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  18. Term of Office Section 1-12 • Presidents serve four-year terms. • The Twenty-second Amendment limits each president to two elected terms, or a maximum of 10 years if the president took office during another president’s term. (pages 167–168) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  19. Term of Office (cont.) Section 1-13 • The president receives a yearly salary of $400,000, plus expenses. • The president lives and works at the White House. • A staff tends to the needs of the president’s family. (pages 167–168) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  20. Term of Office (cont.) Section 1-14 • Camp David, a beautiful estate in Maryland, serves as the president’s retreat and a place to host foreign leaders. • Presidents travel in special cars, helicopters, and airplanes, such as Air Force One. (pages 167–168) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  21. Term of Office (cont.) Section 1-15 Before the Twenty-second Amendment, did most presidents serve more than two terms? Explain. No. Originally the Constitution placed no limits on how many terms a president could serve. George Washington, however, chose to serve only two terms. All other presidents except one followed Washington’s example. (pages 167–168) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  22. The Vice President Section 1-16 • The vice president is elected with the president, and the qualifications are the same for both jobs. • The vice president votes in the Senate in case of a tie, but otherwise has little authority. • Yet if the president dies, is removed from office, becomes seriously ill, or resigns, the vice president becomes president. (page 168) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  23. The Vice President (cont.) Section 1-17 A vice president’s activities rarely make headlines. Under what circumstances would a vice president suddenly become the focus of attention? The rarely visible vice president would suddenly become the focus of attention if the president became ill, died, or left office. The vice president would then become president. (page 168) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  24. Presidential Succession Section 1-18 • The Constitution was not clear about whether the vice president would become president or just take over the president’s duties if the president could no longer serve. • Vice President John Tyler settled the question. • He took the oath as president when William Henry Harrison died in office. (pages 168–169) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  25. Presidential Succession (cont.) Section 1-19 • The Presidential Succession Act of 1947 established the line of succession. • If both the president and vice president die or leave office, the Speaker of the House would be next, followed by the president pro tempore, and then the secretary of state. (pages 168–169) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  26. Presidential Succession (cont.) Section 1-20 • Later the Twenty-fifth Amendment further established that the vice president, after becoming president, would choose another vice president. • Both houses of Congress must approve the choice. (pages 168–169) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  27. Presidential Succession (cont.) Section 1-21 • The amendment gives the vice president a role in determining whether a president is disabled and unable to do the job. • The vice president would then act as president until the president is able to go back to work. (pages 168–169) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  28. Presidential Succession (cont.) Section 1-22 If both the president and vice president die or leave office, who would be the next three people in the order of presidential succession? The next three would be the Speaker of the House, followed by the president pro tempore of the Senate, and then the secretary of state. (pages 168–169) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  29. Checking for Understanding Section 1-23 Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. A __ 1. a group of people named by each state legislature to select the president and vice president __ 2. people appointed to vote in presidential elections for the major candidates A. Electoral College B. electors B Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  30. Checking for Understanding(cont.) Section 1-24 Describe What three qualifications for the U.S. presidency are listed in the Constitution of the United States? A person must be 35 years of age, be a native-born U.S. citizen, and a U.S. resident for 14 years. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  31. Checking for Understanding(cont.) Section 1-25 Identify What are the constitutional duties of the vice president of the United States? The vice president presides over the Senate and votes in the Senate in case of a tie. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  32. Critical Thinking Section 1-26 Making Inferences What did John Adams mean by saying, “I may become everything”? The vice president may become president. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  33. Analyzing Visuals Section 1-27 Identify Examine the chart–Presidential Succession–on page 168 of your textbook. Who is fifth in line to become president of the United States? The secretary of the treasury is fifth in line to become president. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  34. Close Section 1-28 Do you think voters are given enough say in the choice of vice president?

  35. End of Section 1 Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide.

  36. Guide to Reading Main Idea Section 2-1 In addition to the powers of the office described in the Constitution, the president fills other roles that are important to the functioning of the United States government. Key Terms • executive order • pardon • reprieve • amnesty Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  37. Guide to Reading (cont.) Reading Strategy Section 2-2 Summarizing InformationAs you read, in a graphic organizer like the one on page 171 of your textbook, list the powers of the president and give an example of each. Read to Learn • What are the powers assigned to the president by the Constitution? • What are the various roles filled by the president? Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  38. President Warren Harding shakes hands with Babe Ruth. Section 2-3 Click the Speaker button to replay the audio.

  39. Constitutional Powers Section 2-4 • The president’s main job is to carry out the laws passed by Congress. • The Constitution gives the president power to veto, call Congress into special session, serve as commander in chief, and receive foreign officials. • The president can make treaties, appoint judges and top government officials, and pardon convicted criminals. (pages 171–172) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  40. Constitutional Powers (cont.) Section 2-5 • In the State of the Union address each year, the president informs Congress of important issues facing the nation and proposes new legislative programs. (pages 171–172)

  41. Constitutional Powers (cont.) Section 2-6 Why does the president give several speeches to Congress each year, including the State of the Union address? The Constitution requires the president to give Congress information about the “state of the union.” These speeches fulfill that obligation. (pages 171–172) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the answer.

  42. Roles of the President Section 2-7 • As chief executive, the president is in charge of 15 cabinet departments and more than 3 million government workers. • The president appoints the heads of cabinet departments and large agencies, with Senate approval. • The president may not make laws but can issue executive orders–rules or commands that have the force of law. (pages 172–174) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  43. Roles of the President (cont.) Section 2-8 • The president can appoint federal judges, including Supreme Court justices. • This power is important because the way the Supreme Court interprets laws greatly affects life in the United States. • Most presidents appoint justices who share views similar to their own. (pages 172–174) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  44. Roles of the President (cont.) Section 2-9 • The president may grant pardons, or declarations of forgiveness and freedom from punishment. • The president may issue a reprieve, an order to delay a person’s punishment until a higher court can hear the case. • The president may also grant amnesty, a pardon toward a group of people. (pages 172–174) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  45. Roles of the President (cont.) Section 2-10 • The president directs foreign policy, deciding how the United States will act toward other countries. • As commander in chief, the president is in charge of all branches of the armed forces. • Congress and the president share the power to make war. • Only Congress can declare war, but only the president can order soldiers into battle. (pages 172–174) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  46. Roles of the President (cont.) Section 2-11 • Congress has declared war only five times, yet presidents have sent troops into action more than 150 times. • This situation may threaten the system of checks and balances. (pages 172–174) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  47. Roles of the President (cont.) Section 2-12 • After the undeclared Vietnam War, Congress passed the War Powers Act. • This law requires the president to notify Congress immediately when troops are sent into battle. • The troops must be brought home after 60 days unless Congress approves a longer stay or declares war. (pages 172–174) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  48. Roles of the President (cont.) Section 2-13 • Only Congress may introduce bills, but the executive branch proposes most legislation. • All presidents have a legislative program that they want Congress to pass. • They make speeches and talk to key members of Congress to build support for their programs. • The president’s staff works on the laws with members of Congress. (pages 172–174) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  49. Roles of the President (cont.) Section 2-14 • The president and Congress often disagree. • One reason is that the president represents the whole nation. • Congress members represent only their state or district. • Another reason is that the president can serve only two terms. • Many Congress members win reelection many times and remain in office for decades. (pages 172–174) Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.

  50. Roles of the President (cont.) Section 2-15 • As a result, the president often wants to move faster on programs than members of Congress do. (pages 172–174)