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Florida Incident Field Operations Guide

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  1. Florida Incident Field Operations Guide January 2006

  2. All Hazard Approach to Incident Management Florida FOG

  3. Initial Training • Designed for personnel who have NOT already completed training on Florida Field Operations Guide. • First edition of FOG released in 2003. • Provided first all-risk emergency response field operation guide. • Incorporated all facets of Florida’s emergency response program.

  4. Florida Field Operations Guide • Designed to provide reference information for multiple agencies responding to, and working at, large emergency incidents. • Goal is to increase personnel safety and improve efficiency by identifying roles and responsibilities for each responder.

  5. Large Emergency Incidents • Pocket guide for incident management and control of major events including: • Natural Hazards (hurricanes) • Technological Emergencies (Radiological) • Man-made Incidents (Mass Casualties) • National Security (WMD/Terrorism) • Planned Events (Superbowl)

  6. Agencies Responding to Emergency • FOG provides organization for every agency responding to a major emergency including: • Fire and Medical Services • Law Enforcement • Public Health Agencies • State and Federal Agencies • Responders should have copy of FOG in every vehicle/apparatus.

  7. Response to Major Incident • Local agencies respond • County EOC – deploys additional resources • State EOC – deploys state resources • Federal – deploys federal assets and financial assistance

  8. State Disaster Response Plan • In response to large emergency incidents, the Division of Emergency Management coordinates to: • Pre-stage resources for immediate deployment. • Mobilize resources statewide. • Track resources sent to each incident. • Fund and/or provide reimbursement for resources.

  9. Disaster Response

  10. Need for Coordination • Large emergency incidents typically result in: • Response of multiple agencies. • Request for similar and sometimes competing resources. • Extraordinary logistical needs. • Loss of critical infrastructure.

  11. National Incident Management System • Presidential Directive (PD-8). • Department of Homeland Security developed NIMS. • Provides incident management and control for multiple agencies at large emergency incident. • NIMS includes Incident Command System. • Florida FOG is NIMS compliant.

  12. Chapter 1 COMMON RESPONSIBILITIES Chapter 2 SAFETY/ACCOUNTABILITY Chapter 3 COMMAND Chapter 4 OPERATIONS Chapter 5 PLANNING Chapter 6 LOGISTICS Chapter 7 FINANCE/ADMINISTRATION Chapter 8 MAC Chapter 9 AREA COMMAND Chapter 10 COMPLEX FOG Chapters

  13. FOG Chapters • Chapter 11 ORGANIZATIONAL GUIDES • Chapter 12 WILDLAND FIRE • Chapter 13 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS • Chapter 14 MULTI-CASUALTY • Chapter 15 USAR • Chapter 16 HEALTH • Chapter 17 LAW ENFORECMENT • Chapter 18 TERRORISM/WMD

  14. FOG Appendix • Appendix A COMMUNICATIONS • Appendix B GLOSSARY OF TERMS • Appendix C CHEMICAL/BIOLOGICAL

  15. Chapter 1 • Common Responsibilities: • Applies to all responders: • Receive assignment from your agency. • Check in at the ICS Check-in location. • Receive briefing from immediate supervisor. • Know your assigned frequency. • Use clear text and ICS terminology. • Complete reports and forms as required.

  16. Chapter 1 • Common Responsibilities: • Unit Leader Responsibilities: • Determine current status of unit activities. • Develop and implement accountability, safety and security measures for personnel and resources. • Supervise demobilization of unit, including storage of supplies. • Maintain unit records.

  17. Chapter 2 • Personnel Incident Safety and Accountability: • Contains specific requirements regarding accountability of members: • Personnel Emergencies • Hazard Area Operations • Operational Retreat Policy • Glossary of Terms

  18. Chapter 2 • Personnel Emergencies: • “EMERGENCY TRAFFIC” used to clear radio traffic. • Initiate rescue plan assigned by the Incident Commander. • Monitor designated radio channels.

  19. Chapter 2 • Hazard Area Operations: • Requires minimum of four individuals – two individuals working inside the hazard area and two individuals outside the hazard area. • Remain together by radio, visual, voice or signal line communications with the team. • Exception: “imminent life-threatening situation”.

  20. Chapter 2 • Operational Retreat Policy : • “EVACUATION SIGNAL” consist of repeated short blasts of the air horn for approximately 10 seconds, followed by 10 seconds of silence; total air horn evacuation signal including periods of silence will last 50 seconds. • Implement15 Minute Benchmarks.

  21. Chapter 2 • Glossary of Terms: • Emergency Traffic • Personnel Accountability Reports (PAR) • Rapid Intervention Crew/Company (RIC) • Standby Members

  22. Chapter 3 • Command: • Responsible for the overall management of the incident. • The Incident Commander is selected by qualifications and experience. • Most incidents require single Incident Commander. • Large multi-jurisdictional incidents require Unified Command.

  23. Chapter 3 • Command Staff: • Public Information Officer • Safety Officer • Liaison Officer

  24. Chapter 3 • Public Information Officer: • Responsible for developing and releasing information about the incident to the news media, incident personnel, and other appropriate agencies and organizations. • Only one Public Information Officer assigned for each incident. • Joint Information System (JIS) • Joint Information Center (JIC)

  25. Chapter 3 • Liaison Officer: • Contact for representatives of the personnel assigned to the incident by assisting or cooperating agencies. • Only one Liaison Officer will be assigned for each incident.

  26. Chapter 3 • Safety Officer: • Develop and recommend measures for assuring personnel safety. • Assess and/or anticipate hazardous and unsafe situations. • Only one Safety Officer will be assigned for each incident. • May have assistants as necessary.

  27. Chapter 3

  28. Chapter 4 • Operations Section Chief: • Part of General Staff. • Responsible for management of all operations directly applicable to the primary mission. • Activates and supervises organization elements in accordance with the Incident Action Plan. • Directs the preparation of unit operations plans and request resources.

  29. Chapter 4 • Operations: • Ideal span of control is between 3 to 7 units. • Operational Span of Control: • Branch Director • Group /Division Supervisor • Strike Team/Task Force Leader • Single Resource • Staging Area Manager

  30. Chapter 4

  31. Chapter 5 • Planning Section Chief: • Part of General Staff. • Responsible for the collection, evaluation, dissemination and use of information about the development of the incident and status of resources. • Responsible for developing and documenting the Incident Action Plan (IAP).

  32. Chapter 5 • Planning: • Information is needed to: • understand the current situation • predict probable course of incident events, and • prepare alternative strategies and control operations for the incident. • Identifies planning process. • Includes position checklist.

  33. Chapter 5 • Planning Positions: • Resources Unit Leader • Check-in/Status Recorder • Situation Unit Leader • Display Processor • Field Observer • Weather Observer • Documentation Unit Leader • Demobilization Unit Leader • Specialist

  34. Chapter 5

  35. Chapter 6 • Logistics Section Chief: • Part of General Staff. • Responsible for providing facilities, services, and materials in support of the incident.

  36. Chapter 6 • Logistics Section Branches: • Service Branch Director • Communications • Food • Medical • Support Branch Director • Supply • Facilities • Ground

  37. Chapter 6 • Unified Logistics Section: • Address critical issues and actions at State level that require multi-agency efforts and response. • Includes: • State Mobilization Areas • State Logistical Staging Areas • Forward Operations Bases • Base Camps • County Points of Distribution

  38. Chapter 6

  39. Chapter 7 • Finance/Administration Section Chief: • Part of General Staff. • Responsible for all financial, administrative, and cost analysis aspects of the incident. • Includes position checklist.

  40. Chapter 7 • Finance / Administration Section Positions: • Time Unit Leader • Equipment Time Recorder • Personnel Time Recorder • Commissary Manager • Procurement Unit Leader • Compensation / Claims Unit Leader • Compensation For Injury Specialist • Claims Specialist • Cost Unit Leader

  41. Chapter 7

  42. Chapter 8 • Multi-Agency Coordination System (MACS: • Combination of facilities, equipment, personnel, procedures, and communications to assist emergency operations. • Members from various disciplines to ensure coordination with State and local EOC’s. • Not designed to replace tactical Incident Command or function as an Incident Management Team.

  43. Chapter 8 • Multi-Agency Coordination System (MACS): • Will perform the following functions: • Activate and operate in support of the incident. • Asses the situational impact and need for resources. • Report situational awareness to the SEOC. • Coordinate the regional response effort, and • Deploy regional assets to augment local resources in coordination with local EOC’s.

  44. Chapter 8

  45. Chapter 9 • Area Command: • Functions of Area Command are to determine: • Incident objectives. • Incident strategies. • Priorities for the use of critical resources. • Includes position checklist.

  46. Chapter 9 • Area Command: • Designed to manage one large incident with multiple management teams assigned. Civil Disturbance Shots Fired Fires in Multiple Structures Looting Control Problems

  47. Chapter 9

  48. Chapter 10 • Complex: • Defined as two or more incidents located in the same general proximity. • All incidents are assigned to a single Incident Commander or Unified Command to facilitate management.

  49. DIVISION B DIVISION A DIVISION C Chapter 10 • Complex: • Illustration depicts three incidents in onejurisdictional area.

  50. Chapter 11 • Organizational Guides: • Initial response resources are managed by the initial response Incident Commander who will perform all command and general staff functions. • Includes guides for reinforced and multi-division/branch incidents. • Organizational charts reflect all hazards.