promoting whole health engagement a pbhci grantee webinar and discussion january 17 2012 n.
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Promoting Whole Health Engagement A PBHCI Grantee Webinar and Discussion January 17, 2012
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  1. Promoting Whole Health EngagementA PBHCI Grantee Webinar and DiscussionJanuary 17, 2012

  2. AGENDA • Welcome and Introductions • Kathy Reynolds • Opening Remarks • Louise Sterling, Cobb-Douglas CSB - Power of Peers • Larry Fricks – Checklist for Whole Health Engagement • Anthony Salerno – Engaging Individuals in Wellness Groups • Kathy Reynolds – PBHCI Referrals • Open Discussion/Individual Technical Assistance • All PBHCI Grantees • CIHS Updates • Laura Galbreath

  3. The Power of Peers for Whole Health Engagement and Self-Management: • Peer Pledge • Peer cookbook • Peer garden • Peer blog

  4. Checklist for Whole Health Engagement • Does your program send welcoming messages that would encourage you personally to attend? • Does your program focus on what's strong (health/wellness) rather than what's wrong (illness/disability) to inspire hope and confidence? • Does your program promote partnerships and collaborative relationships that focus on shared decision making and participant choices and preferences?

  5. Checklist for Whole Health Engagement • Does your program promote that all staff - doctors, administration, front line - support each person’s whole health goal and weekly action plan so there is buy-in and consistent support at all program levels? • Does your program engage in person-centered planning to determine personal strengths, supports and patterns to create positive, strength-based whole health goals? • Does your program teach skills to create specific whole health goals and weekly action plans positively stated as a new health behavior that is achievable to build a sense of confidence and control?

  6. Checklist for Whole Health Engagement • Does your program promote peer support and group bonding with the outcome that the participation and activities are driven by the participants? • Are your activities respectful of social determinates like culture and poverty promoting activities that participants are culturally comfortable participating in and have the resources for? • Does your program teach skills to facilitate highly engaging health promoting theme centered groups?

  7. Checklist for Whole Health Engagement • Are your activities respectful of social determinants such as culture and poverty? Do they promote activities that participants are culturally comfortable participating in and have the resources for? • Does your program teach skills to facilitate groups that are highly engaging, health promoting, and theme centered? • Does your program teach whole health skills to participants who prefer one-on-one meetings over groups? • Does your program offer a combination of group and individual follow up?

  8. Groups have advantages and challenges • Groups present “emotionally high risk” situations • Safety and trust is paramount and not easy to establish • Wide diversity of experiences, background, knowledge, skills, needs, expectations and readiness among members to make the most out of the group learning opportunity • How to ensure that each member of the group benefits (i.e., how do you personalize the experience for each person) -- very, very challenging • How to ensure that each member has the opportunity to apply learning in the context of his/her circumstances • Diversity of learning readiness (how does this affect the pace of the group) • Challenges associated with closed vs. open groups • Membership often changes: People start and stop at various points • How to ensure the group is interesting and meaningful to participants

  9. So, how can we address these many challenges? • Engaging consumers to identify, plan, and decide on topics of interest • Building in opportunities for participants to facilitate a group (note: having a straightforward and easy group facilitation format to follow helps) • Having clear and easily visible ground rules that have been generated and agreed upon by members can go a long way • Building in hands-on activities builds interest and is one bridge from knowledge acquisition to application • Combine group work with individual follow up • Having a clear, transparent and easy to follow group learning format is a real plus! • Avoid lecturing and sermonizing

  10. Let’s Discuss

  11. To ask your question over the phone please use the “raise your hand” button and we will open up your lines for you to ask your question to the group. (left) To ask your question via the chat please type your questions into the question box and we will address your questions. (right)

  12. Thank you! For immediate technical assistance needs, general questions, or additional information, contact: Emma Green Training & Technical Assistance Coordinator emmag@thenationalcouncil.org (202) 684-7457, Ext. 251