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Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) Day 2

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Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) Day 2
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  1. Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) Day 2 http://miblsi.cenmi.org <Trainers’ Names Here>

  2. Acknowledgements The material for this training day was developed with the efforts of… • Mary Bechtel • Susan Bogart • Steve Goodman • Anna Harms • Sue Mack • Norman McIntyre • Melissa Nantais • Jennifer Rollenhagen • Kim St. Martin • Brenda Tarsa • Stephaine Williams • Sheila Williams-White • Jerry Zielinski Content was based on the work of: • Rob Horner, Anne Todd, University of Oregon • George Sugai, University of Connecticut

  3. Setting Group Expectations • To make this day the best possible, we need your assistance and participation • Be Responsible • Attend to the “Come back together” signal • Active participation…Please ask questions • Be Respectful • Please allow others to listen • Please turn off cell phones and pagers • Please limit sidebar conversations • Share “air time” • Please refrain from email and Internet browsing • Be Safe • Take care of your own needs

  4. When you see this, it means. . . This is an important idea!

  5. 1 OutcomesBy the end of Day 2, participants will have • A common understanding of the importance of explicit teaching of schoolwide behavioral expectations and begun developing lesson plans for teaching behavioral expectations. • A common understanding of the need to monitor behavior as part of the Schoolwide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS). • A common understanding of the importance of acknowledging appropriate behavior and begun developing a system for acknowledging appropriate behavior within their school. • A common understanding of the use of various sources of data for making decisions regarding the implementation of Schoolwide PBIS.

  6. 2 Agenda • Teaching Behavioral Expectations • Monitoring Expected Behavior • Acknowledging/Encouraging Expected Behaviors • Data-Based Decision Making

  7. 5.0 Teaching Behavioral Expectations http://miblsi.cenmi.org

  8. “If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.” “If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we……..... ……….teach? ………punish?” “Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?” Tom Herner (NASDE President ), 1998

  9. Big Ideas In Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports • Identify & define expectations • Teach expectations • Monitor expected behavior • Acknowledge/Encourage expected behavior • Use data for decision making • Correct behavioral errors (continuum of consequences) Yesterday January, along with classroom management

  10. 28 Teaching Academic and Behavior DEFINE Simply MODEL ADJUST for Efficiency PRACTICE in Setting MONITOR & ACKNOWLEDGE Continuously

  11. 28 Contrasting Positive and Negative Examples of Behavioral Expectations • Purpose: to help students better understand the parameters of what is and what is not the expected behavior- helps to “Definethe Edges” • Choose examples that best “fit” the general case of the behavior expectation • Choose nonexamples that are: • Close to being examples of expected behavior rather than outrageous nonexamples • Typical of what students do when they are not engaged in the expected behavior

  12. Provide multiple examples and non-examples This is not galoof. This is galoof. This is not galoof. This is galoof. This is not galoof. This is galoof. Is this galoof? Is this galoof? from Engelmann S., & Carnine, D. (1991). Theory of instruction: Principles and applications. Eugene, OR: ADI

  13. 29 Process for Teaching Behavioral Expectations • Define the Expectation • Provide a Rationale • Teach the Critical Discrimination • Demonstrate Appropriate Behavior • Demonstrate Unacceptable Behavior • Practice telling the difference with multiple examples • If there is a “signal” teach the signal (when should the appropriate behavior occur?) • Have everyone practice the appropriate behavior • Acknowledge students for demonstrating appropriate behavior

  14. Teaching behavior expectations like academic lessons at Woodward

  15. Hopkins Teaching Expectations Example

  16. Students participate in communicating behavior expectations at Holland Heights

  17. Pos t e r s Parkwood UpJohn Arcadia Elementary Hillside Middle School Milwood Middle School

  18. Use Behavior Matrix to Create Behavior Lesson Plans

  19. 30 Expected Behavior Lesson PlanSample # 1

  20. 31 Expected Behavior Lesson PlanSample # 2

  21. Teaching Behavior Expectations in Hallway:East Elementary

  22. Reduction in Major Discipline Referrals Teaching Behavior Expectations in Hallway:East Elementary

  23. 32 Critical Features of Effective Behavioral Expectation Lessons • Behavior expectation is clearly identified • Lesson is being taught in the location • Rational provided • Examples provided • Examples “fit” the general case • Non-examples are provided • Non-examples are similar to examples of expected behavior • Non-examples are typical of what students do • Opportunities to practice • Expected behavior(s) acknowldeged

  24. 32 “Critique” the Lesson

  25. 33 Team Time Use the “Behavior Expectation Lesson Plan” worksheet to create your own lesson plan(s) for teaching behavior expectations for the 1-2 key areas identified yesterday on your matrix. If you have previously created lesson plans for all areas in your school, use the Critical Features Checklist to identify any areas in need of improvement. Please take a moment to complete the appropriate section of the Follow-Up Activity Worksheet to document the work yet to be done

  26. 34 Teach Behavioral Expectations • Teach in the actual settings where behaviors are to occur • Teach both: • the words • the actions • Build a social culture that is predictable and focused on student success.

  27. “Traveling Passports” • Precorrecting new kids • Procedures • Meet with key adults • Review expectations • Get “Passport” stamped • Go to next teaching location Portage Community High School Cameron School Sandy Hill Elementary

  28. 34 Loftis Elementary Muskegon Hts., MI Important to teach behavior within the context you want it to occur Parkwood-UpJohn Elementary Loftis Elementary

  29. 34-35 Team Time How will your school conduct the teaching of behavior expectations in the setting where the behavior should occur? Use the “Teaching Behavior Expectations Schedule of Events – Fall 2011” worksheet to record your plan. Please take a moment to complete the appropriate section of the Follow-Up Activity Worksheet to document the work yet to be done

  30. 34 When to Teach Expectations • Teaching Sessions • Younger students: 10- 15 minutes sessions • Older students: longer teaching sessions • First week- every day • First month- every Monday • Throughout year- first day back from extended vacations • When new person (student or staff) joins class

  31. Other times we have found helpful • Prior to an assembly or special program • Prior to a substitute teacher coming • Prior to a change in routine • When data suggests a need for a refresher

  32. Booster Trainings • There will be times when we all need a more intensive refresher across campus. • When might those times may be? • What will the format booster training look like? • How will you introduce/teach new students and staff?

  33. Using Data to Make Decisionsabout Teaching • Your school’s expectations are: • Show Respect • Be an Active Learner • Be Prepared • Show Self-Control • Each month your school focuses on teaching one expectation during homeroom and in the ISS room

  34. This is your school’s baseline data. In which months do you think your school should consider a booster training?

  35. What expectation should your school focus on teaching next month?

  36. What expectation should your school focus on teaching next month?

  37. Keeping in mind that you need to teach students the behaviors where they typically occur, in what locations on campus do students need a “refresher”?

  38. Use games to reteach behavior expectations • Jeopardy format with questions and answers regarding behavior expectations in different settings (Hallways for $200 please) • Are you Smarter Than a 5th Grader with questions about how students should behave • BINGO using behavior expectations

  39. Are you Smarter Than an 8th Grader? Reviewing Behavior Expectations by Using Technology Milwood Middle School

  40. Milwood Magnet (Middle) School:Behavior expectations review using sentence strips

  41. Getting Students Involved in Reviewing Expectations Congress Elementary School Assembly Parkwood-UpJohn Music Class

  42. Reviewing Behavior Expectations in Many Different Ways Vandenboom School Song • Be Safe • Be Respectful • Be Responsible

  43. Story Starter 6th grade class At our school, we believe that everyone should be respectful, responsible and safe. Last week I noticed another student following these rules by….

  44. Reviewing behavior expectations with students at Pentwater Middle School

  45. Teaching Behavior Expectations:Booster Lessons South Range Elementary School- Recess Expectations

  46. Lincoln Park Elementary: Reviewing Expectations with Door Contest

  47. 36-37 Team Time How will your school conduct the re-teaching of behavior expectations? Use the “Teaching Behavioral Expectations: Yearly Schedule of Events” worksheet to record your plan. Please take a moment to complete the appropriate section of the Follow-Up Activity Worksheet to document the work yet to be done