innovation in an age of limits n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Innovation in an Age of Limits PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Innovation in an Age of Limits

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 45

Innovation in an Age of Limits - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 146 Views
  • Uploaded on

Innovation in an Age of Limits. Jay Schafer Director of Libraries UMass Amherst . Perfect Storm. Main Entry: perfect storm Function: noun Date: 1936 : a critical or disastrous situation created by a powerful concurrence of factors. Critical/Disastrous Situation #1.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Innovation in an Age of Limits' - wells


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
innovation in an age of limits

Innovationin an Age of Limits

Jay Schafer

Director of Libraries

UMass Amherst

ACRL Science & Technology Section – June 27, 2011

perfect storm
Perfect Storm

Main Entry: perfect storm

Function: noun

Date: 1936

: a critical or disastrous situation created by a powerfulconcurrence of factors

critical disastrous situation 1
Critical/Disastrous Situation #1

In “A Letter to His Kids,” Wired's Founding Editor Recalls the Dawn of the Digital Revolution:

In the very first issue (March 1993) I wrote, "The Digital Revolution is whipping through our lives like a Bengali typhoon.“ Got a lot of grief for that typhoon reference — as if it were a pretentious exaggeration instead of the understatement it turned out to be. Should have said the Digital Revolution was ripping through our lives like the meteor that extinguished the dinosaurs. Practically every institution that our society is based on, from the local to the supranational, is being rendered obsolete.

This is the world you are inheriting.

Louis Rossetto

“What we got right – and wrong.” Wired. June 2008

critical disastrous situation 2
Critical/Disastrous Situation #2

Global economic downturn

the perfect storm the movie
The Perfect Storm – The Movie

Is this the Library ???

biggest challenge for libraries
Biggest Challenge for Libraries
  • Biggest challenge is not budgets
  • Biggest challenge is adapting to the digital environment
attributed to charles darwin
Attributed to Charles Darwin:

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.”

the information age and the printing press looking backward to see ahead
TheInformation Age and the Printing Press: Looking Backward to See Ahead

James A. Dewar

Rand Report P-8014.1998

http://rand.org/pubs/papers/P8014/index2.html

the information age and the printing press looking backward to see ahead1

Information Age is defined by networked computers

Internet dates back to 1962 when concept of packet switching and ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network) was developed to maintain connectivity of the military command and control network in case of nuclear attack.

World Wide Web – 1990

Google released – 2000

TheInformation Age and the Printing Press: Looking Backward to See Ahead.
the information age and the printing press looking backward to see ahead2

Communication before the printing press:

One to One

Communication with the printing press:

One to Many

Communication in the Information Age:

Many to Many

TheInformation Age and the Printing Press: Looking Backward to See Ahead.
the information age and the printing press looking backward to see ahead3

The parallels between the printing press era and today are sufficiently compelling to suggest:

Changes in the information age will be as dramatic as those in the Middle Ages in Europe. The printing press has been implicated in the Reformation, the Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution, all of which had profound effects on their eras; similarly profound changes may already be underway in the information age.

TheInformation Age and the Printing Press: Looking Backward to See Ahead.
the information age and the printing press looking backward to see ahead4

The parallels between the printing press era and today are sufficiently compelling to suggest:

The future of the information age will be dominated by unintended consequences. The Protestant Reformation and the shift from an earth-centered to a sun-centered universe were unintended consequences in the printing press era.

TheInformation Age and the Printing Press: Looking Backward to See Ahead.
the information age and the printing press looking backward to see ahead5

The parallels between the printing press era and today are sufficiently compelling to suggest:

It will be decades before we see the full effects of the information age. The important effects of the printing press era were not seen clearly for more than 100 years.

TheInformation Age and the Printing Press: Looking Backward to See Ahead.
the information age and the printing press looking backward to see ahead6

The parallels between the printing press era and today are sufficiently compelling to suggest:

The above factors combine to argue for:

keeping the Internet unregulated, and

taking a much more experimental approach to information policy.

TheInformation Age and the Printing Press: Looking Backward to See Ahead.
the information age and the printing press looking backward to see ahead7

The parallels between the printing press era and today are sufficiently compelling to suggest:

Changes in the information age will be as dramatic as those in the Middle Ages in Europe.

TheInformation Age and the Printing Press: Looking Backward to See Ahead.
the shift from print to digital resources
The Shift from Print to Digital Resources
  • Library Card Catalog and print A&I tools
  • Online Catalog and electronic A&I tools
  • Aggregator full text databases
  • E-journals
  • Digitized print/media resources
  • Born digital resources
  • E-books
the shift from print to digital resources1
The Shift from Print to Digital Resources

Discovery

  • Cards
  • Online Catalog
  • Cloud Discovery
the shift from print to digital resources2
The Shift from Print to Digital Resources

Serials

  • Ordering by individual title
  • Check in
  • Binding
  • E-journals
  • Open URL linking
the shift from print to digital resources3
The Shift from Print to Digital Resources

Monographs

  • Selection
  • Acquisitions
  • Licensing
  • E-Books
overcoming limits1
Overcoming Limits
  • Funding for Staffing
    • Retirements
    • Vacancies
    • Reassignments (voluntary)
    • Cost-sharing
    • Grants
overcoming limits2
Overcoming Limits
  • Funding for Acquisitions
    • Consortium purchases/License negotiations
    • Use analysis and cancellations
    • Interlibrary Loan – the collection you don’t own
      • Rapid ILL
      • Consortial borrowing
overcoming limits3
Overcoming Limits
  • Funding for Operations and Facilities
    • Salary savings
    • Fundraising
limits drive innovation tech services the last recession
Limits Drive Innovation: Tech ServicesThe Last Recession
  • Consolidated vendors
  • E-selection
  • Shelf ready books
  • Use-based collection decisions
  • “Just in time” vs. “Just in case”
  • Expedited document delivery/ILL services
limits drive innovation tech services this recession
Limits Drive Innovation: Tech ServicesThis Recession

Five Colleges Consolidated Tech Services

  • Unify the user experience across the five libraries
  • Maximize efficiencies so staff can deal with new “21st Century” tasks
  • Provide cost savings where possible
limits drive innovation tech services this recession1
Limits Drive Innovation: Tech ServicesThis Recession

Acquisitions Budget

  • 80% electronic resources
  • 20% print resources

Technical Services Staffing

  • 80% print resources
  • 20% electronic resources
limits drive innovation tech services five colleges consolidated tech services
Limits Drive Innovation: Tech ServicesFive Colleges Consolidated Tech Services

The Dream – Print Resources

  • Consolidation
  • The “One Centralize Technical Services” Model

The Dream – Electronic Resources

  • Common Collections
  • Common Discovery
    • Discovery tool to supplement OPAC
    • A-Z E-journal list
    • A-Z Database list
  • Expedited article delivery – Rapid ILL
limits drive innovation tech services five colleges consolidated tech services1
Limits Drive Innovation: Tech ServicesFive Colleges Consolidated Tech Services

The Reality – Print Resources

  • Consolidated vendor
  • Shelf ready books
  • Reduce unnecessary duplication

The Reality – Implementation Issues

  • Perceived “disrespecting” of past work
  • Perceived disregard of “local value added”
  • Loss of local control
  • HR Issues
    • Re-location of employees
    • Benefits/Retire issues
    • Unions
limits drive innovation scholarly communication
Limits Drive Innovation: Scholarly Communication
  • ScholarWorks@UMassAmherst
    • Institutional repository
    • Cloud solution - Digital Commons
    • E-Theses/dissertations
    • E-journals
    • E-Conference proceedings
limits drive innovation scholarly communication1
Limits Drive Innovation: Scholarly Communication

Campus Partners

  • Provost
    • Showcase faculty
    • Community engagement
  • Vice Chancellor for Research
    • Showcase research
    • NIH mandate
    • NSF data plans
  • Dean, Graduate School
    • Electronic theses/dissertations
  • Dean, Commonwealth Honors College
    • Honors theses
limits drive innovation scholarly communication2
Limits Drive Innovation: Scholarly Communication

Open Educational Resources

  • Joint Provost/Library “Open Education Initiative” Grants
  • $1,000 each for 10 faculty
  • $71,950 estimated savings to students
limits drive innovation facilities
Limits Drive Innovation: Facilities

Five Colleges Depository (the Bunker)

  • Single shared copy
  • Affiliates programs for JStor Collection
  • Expansion

New England Regional Depository (the NERD)

  • Discussions this summer
  • Single shared copy
limits drive innovation facilities1
Limits Drive Innovation: Facilities
  • Learning Commons
    • Procrastination Station Café, Library services, Technology services, Writing Center, Student tutoring, Assistive Technologies Lab, Academic advising, Study Abroad advising
  • Teaching Commons
    • Library services for faculty, Academic Computing, Office of Faculty Development
  • Multimedia Student Production Hub (Fall 2012)
limits drive innovation facilities coming attractions
Limits Drive Innovation: Facilities – coming attractions
  • Research Commons
    • Library services, Office of Contracts & Grants, Office of Commercial Ventures and Intellectual Property
  • Graduate Commons
    • Graduate students
limits drive innovation digital initiates
Limits Drive Innovation: Digital Initiates
  • Digital Strategies Group
    • Metadata Working Group
    • Digital Creation and Preservation Working Group
    • Data Working Group
  • Streaming video – e-reserves
  • CREDO – Special Collections Fedora repository
  • Digital Image Library
the future 5 10 years out
The Future (5-10 years out)
  • Cloud discovery
  • Digital Media and Information Literacy
  • Tablets and handheld devices rule
  • Re-define “e-books”
  • Multi-media
  • Open Educational Resources
  • Open Access E-Publishing
the future 5 10 years out1
The Future (5-10 years out)
  • Cloud collections
  • Cloud technical services
  • Caring for the legacy print collections
    • Maintain small current print collections, print on demand
    • Move legacy print collections to depository
the future 5 10 years out2
The Future (5-10 years out)
  • Emphasis on Special Collections
  • Digitization
  • Data curation for locally created resources (digital humanities, E-science, digital repositories)
  • Preservation of local digital scholarship
the information age and the printing press looking backward to see ahead8

The parallels between the printing press era and today are sufficiently compelling to suggest:

Changes in the information age will be as dramatic as those in the Middle Ages in Europe.

TheInformation Age and the Printing Press: Looking Backward to See Ahead.
attributed to charles darwin1
Attributed to Charles Darwin:

“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.”

thank you

Thank You

Jay Schafer

jschafer@library.umass.edu