slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The 19 th Century Russian Economy PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The 19 th Century Russian Economy

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 17

The 19 th Century Russian Economy - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 104 Views
  • Uploaded on

The 19 th Century Russian Economy. Eric Helmold. Overview. Progression of Russian Economy 19 th Century Influences on Crime and Punishment and Textual Appearances . Progression of Russian Economy 19 th Century. Economy Early 1800s. Largely agrarian b ased

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'The 19 th Century Russian Economy' - virgo


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
overview
Overview
  • Progression of Russian Economy 19th Century
  • Influences on Crime and Punishment and Textual Appearances
economy early 1800s
Economy Early 1800s
  • Largely agrarian based
  • Limited industry, comparatively “backwards”
  • Social-Economic Classes
    • Nobles (Landowners)
    • Free Peasants (Tenant Farmers)
    • Serfs (Farmers tied to land)
  • Hundreds of serf uprisings
the crimean war 1852 56
The Crimean War (1852-56)
  • Russia fought against western Europe
  • Russian industry was insufficient
    • Shortage of weapons, munitions, and machinery
    • Poor railway network
    • Ill-equipped army
  • Russia suffered terrible losses
  • Need for modernization clearly realized
1861 freeing the serfs
1861-Freeing the Serfs
  • Tsar Alexander II issues emancipation of serfs 1861
    • 44% of population, 22 million serfs
    • Owned by 100,000 landowners (pomeshchiki)
    • Paid owners bonds, serfs owed collective debt
  • Motivation of modernization
    • Last European country with serfdom
    • Mobile industrial labor source
    • Easier conscription
economic analysis
Economic Analysis
  • Serfs gained economic freedoms
    • Small pieces of land distributed
    • Many formed village communes
    • Peasants struggled to pay 50 year debt
    • Landowners’ Gov. bonds devalued
  • Progress was not immediate
    • Most serfs not much better off
    • Emerging small, successful peasant class (Kulak)
1870s rise of industry
1870s-Rise of Industry
  • Large expansion of railroad network
  • Growth of urban centers and population
    • Moscow, Kiev, St. Petersburg, Baltic Coast
  • Coal, steel, and petroleum production increase
  • Mining and industrial development
1890s sergei witte
1890s – Sergei Witte
  • Finance/Transportation Minister of Russia
    • Encouraged foreign investment
    • Moved to gold standard (1897)
    • Heavy taxation of peasants
    • Trans-Siberian Railroad (1904)
    • Large deficit spending
  • Greater growth in 1890s than in entire previous century
trans siberian railroad
Trans-Siberian Railroad
  • Moscow to Vladivostok (1904)
  • Connected east and west
    • Resource deposits in east
    • Factories and ports in west
  • Costly to build but good investment
statistical figures
Statistical Figures
  • 18501890 Population doubled
  • 18601890 Coal production up 1,200%
  • 1890 – 20,000 miles RR, 1.4 Million factory workers
  • 18901900 Coal, Iron, Oil production tripled
  • 19001/2 of heavy industry foreign owned
  • 4th in world steel production, 2nd petroleum
russian urbanization setting
Russian Urbanization-Setting
  • Serfs moved to cities  Industrial Proletariat
  • Rapid industrialization/urbanization
    • Poor grade housing, tenements, overcrowding
    • Unhygienic living conditions, pollution
    • Poor nutrition, crime, spread of disease
  • Pg.5-6 “accustomed to shabbiness” / “drunken men” / “house […] more like a cupboard”
  • Marfa’s Tuberculosis, people getting ill
  • Pg.120 “Soup and meat” / “spoonfuls of soup”
more quotes
More Quotes
  • “A disgusting place – filthy, stinking” Pg. 143 Raskolnikov
  • “There have been many economic changes” Pg. 147 Zossimov
  • “Love yourself above everyone else, for everything in the world relies on self-interest” “Economic truth adds” / “We have been hindered by idealism and sentimentalism” Pg. 145 Luzhin
revolutionary idealists
Revolutionary Idealists
  • Capitalism – Profits, free markets
  • Utilitarianism – Greatest good for majority
  • Socialism – Collective ownership of factories
  • Communism – Classless society of equality
  • Utopian Societies
  • Lebeziatnikov’s ideas Pg.351 “through communes” / “normal condition of women” / “protest against the organization of society”
development of worker s parties
Development of Worker’s Parties
  • Urban strikes and unionization
  • Russian Social Democratic Labor Party – 1898
  • United Socialist Revolutionary Party
  • Petrograd Soviet in 20th Century
  • Vladimir Lenin and the Bolsheviks
  • Siberian labor sentences used criminals and political dissidents
  • Raskolnikov sentenced to hard labor
    • Pg.507 “second-class convict Rodian”