nucleic acids n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Nucleic Acids PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Nucleic Acids

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 12

Nucleic Acids - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 78 Views
  • Uploaded on

Nucleic Acids. Meghan Arora Jeff Chen Julia Kubik Pratibha Sharma Anna Ye. Types: D eoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) Ribonucleic acid (RNA) These molecules: Store and transmit hereditary material Allow living organisms to pass on their traits. Functions. DNA.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Nucleic Acids' - vin


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
nucleic acids

Nucleic Acids

Meghan Arora

Jeff Chen

Julia Kubik

Pratibha Sharma

Anna Ye

functions

Types:

  • Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)
  • Ribonucleic acid (RNA)
  • These molecules:
  • Store and transmit
  • hereditary material
  • Allow living organisms to
  • pass on their traits

Functions

slide3
DNA
  • Made of hundreds to thousands of genes
  • Contains all the information that program all cell activities
  • During cell reproduction, DNA is copied and passed on to the next generation
  • Favourable traits are preserved, copied, and continue to be passed down
    • Species evolve
slide4
RNA
  • Synthesized by genes along the length of a DNA molecule
  • Controls protein synthesis
  • Sends genetic instructions for building proteins from the nucleus to ribosomes located in the cytoplasm
slide5

Monomer

  • Smallest unit of nucleic acids is a nucleotide
  • A nucleotide consists of:
  • pentose sugar
  • phosphate group
  • one of four different
  • nitrogenous bases
  • (A, G, C, and T or U)
  • RNA has ribose as its pentose and U as one of its bases
  • DNA has deoxyribose as its pentose and T as one of its bases
parts of a monomer nitrogenous base
Parts of a Monomer: Nitrogenous Base

There are two families of nitrogenous bases:

pyrimidines and purines

  • Pyrimidines:
  • Six membered ring of carbon and nitrogen atoms
  • Purines
  • Six membered pyrimidine ring, fused to an additional five membered ring
parts of a monomer pentose
Parts of a Monomer: Pentose
  • Ribose in nucleotides of RNA
  • Deoxyribose in DNA
  • Only difference is that deoxyribose lacks an oxygen atom on its number 2 carbon, hence the name
parts of a monomer phosphate group
Parts of a Monomer: Phosphate Group
  • A phosphate group attached to the number 5 carbon of the sugar completes the construction of a nucleotide
slide9

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP)

The cell performs three main functions:

1. Mechanical Work

2.Transport Work

3. Chemical Work

  • Significance:
  • Main energy source in a cell- releases -7.3 kcal of energy per mole, ( -13 kcal/mol in natural environments)
  • Its high reactivity is caused by the triphosphate tail- the phosphate groups are all negatively charged and act like a loaded spring

Pg.94

slide10

How ATP Performs Work

  • Energy released from the hydrolysis of ATP is used to transfer the extra phosphate group to energy absorbing reactions with the help of specific enzymes
  • The altered phosphorylated molecule is an intermediate and more reactive
  • Ex. synthesis of glutamine (an amino acid) from glutamic acid and ammonia
  • Another vital property of ATP is its regenerative quality, called the ATP cycle

Pg.95

slide11

The ATP Cycle

ATP can be recycled through the phosphorylation of ADP (when ADP combines with a phosphate), and where the energy required for that reaction comes from catabolism (breakdown reactions).In most cases, the energy comes from cellular respiration and light energy in plants.

Below: The ATP cycle

Pg.95

slide12

Works Cited

http://rachelkahn3b.edublogs.org/2011/11/29/dna-structure-model-lab/

http://www.mrmacaraeg.com/Biology_11_Downloads.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:RNA-comparedto-DNA_thymineAndUracilCorrected.png

http://digitaljournal.com/img/8/7/3/i/5/9/6/o/060130dnastrand.jpg

http://ap-bio-patrick-steed.wikispaces.com/DNA+vs+RNA,+DNA+Replication

http://www.thaibiotech.info/Picture/Phosphate.gif