Ceramics 1 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Ceramics 1

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  1. Ceramics 1 Week 9

  2. Patting/paddling • Hitting seam gently with a wooden tool • Reinforces joins to Strengthen the joined area! • Realigns clay particles in one direction • Creates textures

  3. 5 Reasons Why Clay Becomes Bone Dry at Different Rates • 1.Humidity clay dries faster in drier locations like Arizona than in Wisconsin

  4. 2.Thickness • Thin walls dry faster than thick walls

  5. 3. Surface Area • The more exposed surface area the faster the surface will dry • Projections and appendages dry faster than the main pot

  6. 4. Air Movement The side of the project that faces a breeze will dry first

  7. 5. Overall Size of the Form • Large pots dry slower than small ones

  8. Force Drying • Placing a wet piece in the sun, under heat lamps, using a hairdryer, or heating vent to dry the piece quickly.

  9. 1st Reason to Avoid Force Drying • 1.Pieces drying unevenly will appear dry but firing the piece will cause it to explode.

  10. 2nd Reason to Avoid Force Drying • When clay dries quickly it causes stress cracks and pieces can fall apart

  11. 3rd Reason to Avoid Force Drying • When surface area dries too quickly it shrinks more quickly than the clay beneath causing the piece to warp.

  12. Air Dry Rack • Drying rack that has shelves made so that air can reach all surfaces of the clay as it dries. Pots dry from the top down so turn pots upside-down on rack

  13. Re-softening Leather Hard Clay For clay that is slightly too hard but can be dented with gentle fingernail pressure • 1.Wrap project with a damp paper towel • 2.Place wrapped project into a plastic bag • 3.Wait overnight for moisture to be absorbed

  14. Symbols • Codes, patterns, and designs that represent reality using a general or simplified image

  15. Creative Problem Solving Skill Begin by making a mark on your paper (or on your pot) and work from the mark. It's like jumper cables for your brain…it gets your creative juices pumping. • Doodle

  16. Paul Klee • “A line is a dot out for a stroll.” 

  17. Henri Matisse • “I am simply conscious of the forces I am using and I am driven on by an idea that I really only grasp as it grows with the picture.”