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Appropriating New Urbanism Principles to the Egyptian Context. Ayat Ismail Abdel Fattah Ismail Teaching Assistant - Dept. of Urban Design & Planning Faculty of Engineering - Ain Shams University Supervised by Prof. Dr. Youhansen Yehya Eid Professor of Urban Planning

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slide1

Appropriating New Urbanism Principles to the Egyptian Context

Ayat Ismail Abdel Fattah Ismail

Teaching Assistant - Dept. of Urban Design & Planning

Faculty of Engineering - Ain Shams University

Supervised by

Prof. Dr. Youhansen Yehya Eid

Professor of Urban Planning

Head of Dept. of Urban Planning & Design

Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University

Dr. Germine Farouk El-Gohary

Associate Professor - Dept. of Urban Planning & Design

Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University

slide2

Introduction

What is New Urbanism?

New Urbanism is an urban design movement became very popular in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s

Aims to

  • Raising quality of life and standard of living by creating better places to live.
  • Reviving the lost art of place-making
  • Re-ordering of the built environment to form complete cities, towns, villages, and neighborhoods
slide3

Introduction

What is New Urbanism?

How?

  • It promotes the creation of diverse, walkable, compact, energetic, mixed-use communities

In other words

  • Contains houses, work spaces, shops, entertainment, schools parks, and civic facilities essential to the daily needs of the residents,
  • All uses are within easy walking distance, public transportation and light rail, well defined public spaces, pleasant walking environment, and green spaces are available.
slide4

Research Problem

Out of 60 planned new communities, 19 new communities were built in Egypt during the past 30 years; for many reasons – such as economy, management, implementation…..etc – only two cities could accomplish more than 50% of their target population which is very low ratio.

One of the reason behind the Egyptian new cities problem is that their rational plans could not create livable communities which meet the human needs and demands.

slide5

Research Objective

The research aims to study New Urbanism Principles and testing them on Egyptian new cities, in order to determine the applicability of each principle on Egyptian social and physical context, also to find out the possible adaptations required for those principles according to the demands of the residents of new cities in Egypt.

slide6

Research Hypothesis

“New, Post and other urbanisms, they do represent different values and sensibilities. They need to be situated in time and space, contextualized in different cultures and geographies” (Kelbaug, in Fisherman, 2005)

Although Kelbaug claimed that New Urbanism principles need to be adapted to fit in different cultures and geographies, some principles are universal and should be applied (with no required adaptations) on cities regardless its location, size, or environment.

slide7

Research Methodology

Theoretical Review

Field Survey

Local Examples

General Principles

International Examples

Principles’ appropriating process

Egyptian New Urbanism Principles

slide8

Research Structure

Part 1: Theoretical Review

Chapter 1: Definitions, History and Motivations.

Chapter 2: Principles of New Urbanism Movement.

Chapter 3: Analysis of International New Communities.

Part 2: Appropriating New Urbanism Principles

Chapter 4: Testing NU principles on Egyptian New Cities.

Chapter 5: NU principles’ Appropriating Process.

Chapter 6: Conclusions and Recommendations.

Part 3: Appendices

Appendix 1: Charter of New Urbanism.

Appendix 2: Classification of Egyptian New Communities.

Appendix 3: Field Survey Study - Statistical Procedures.

slide9

Chapter 1

Definitions, History, and Motivations

  • New Urbanism Objectives
  • Reasons behind New Urbanism emergence
  • Rise of New Urbanism
  • Historical Reasons
  • Sprawl (Suburban pattern of development)
  • Response to sprawl
  • Congress of New Urbanism
slide10

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

1. Walkability

2. Connectivity

3. Pedestrian Friendly design

Human Scale

Creating Public Spaces

Safety

4. Diversity

Mixed uses

Mixed housing

5. Smart transportation

6. Parking alternatives

7. Sustainability

8. Increased density

9. Rehabilitation of old buildings

10. Self-governing neighborhood

slide11

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

1. Walkability

2. Connectivity

3. Pedestrian Friendly design

Human Scale

Creating Public Spaces

Safety

4. Diversity

Mixed uses

Mixed housing

1. Walkability

Activities are within 5 to 10 min walk (1/4 mile, or 400 m) from home and work in a moderate weather

slide12

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

1. Walkability

2. Connectivity

3. Pedestrian Friendly design

Human Scale

Creating Public Spaces

Safety

4. Diversity

Mixed uses

Mixed housing

2. Connectivity

slide13

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

1. Walkability

2. Connectivity

3. Pedestrian Friendly design

Human Scale

Creating Public Spaces

Safety

4. Diversity

Mixed uses

Mixed housing

Avenue

3. Pedestrian Friendly design

Main streets

Secondary streets

slide14

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

1. Walkability

2. Connectivity

3. Pedestrian Friendly design

Human Scale

Creating Public Spaces

Safety

4. Diversity

Mixed uses

Mixed housing

4. Diversity

slide15

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

5. Smart transportation

6. Parking alternatives

7. Sustainability

8. Increased density

9. Rehabilitation of old buildings

10. Self-governing neighborhood

5. Smart transportation

slide16

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

5. Smart transportation

6. Parking alternatives

7. Sustainability

8. Increased density

9. Rehabilitation of old buildings

10. Self-governing neighborhood

6. Parking alternatives

slide17

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

5. Smart transportation

6. Parking alternatives

7. Sustainability

8. Increased density

9. Rehabilitation of old buildings

10. Self-governing neighborhood

7. Sustainability

slide18

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

5. Smart transportation

6. Parking alternatives

7. Sustainability

8. Increased density

9. Rehabilitation of old buildings

10. Self-governing neighborhood

8. Increased density

slide19

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

5. Smart transportation

6. Parking alternatives

7. Sustainability

8. Increased density

9. Rehabilitation of old buildings

10. Self-governing neighborhood

9. Rehabilitation of old buildings

slide20

Chapter 2

General Principles of New Urbanism

5. Smart transportation

6. Parking alternatives

7. Sustainability

8. Increased density

9. Rehabilitation of old buildings

10. Self-governing neighborhood

10. Self-governing neighborhood

slide21

195 m

410m

120 m

135 m

455 m

170m

490 m

365 m

195 m

250 m

300m

520 m

350 m

350 m

Chapter 3

Application on International New Cities

  • Achieved
  • Achieved
  • Achieved
  • Achieved
  • Achieved
  • Achieved
  • Achieved
  • Achieved
  • Achieved
  • Achieved
  • Achieved
  • Achieved

180 m

350 m

220 m

310 m

300 m

300 m

425m

400 m

340 m

280 m

570 m

610 m

720 m

slide22

Chapter 4

Testing NU principles on Egyptian New Cities

1. Physical Analysis

Current Urban Conditions from New Urbanism Perspective

10th of Ramadan city

32 Sample

2. Social Analysis

Field survey applied on 142 sample from New Cities residents investigated:

Residents satisfactory degree with their built environment

Their correspondences in case of applying New Urbanism principles

New Cairo city

66 Sample

6th of October city

44 Sample

slide23

440 m

530 m

460 m

550 m

530 m

550 m

370 m

750 m

500 m

580m

600m

390m

270m

250m

350m

590m

330m

1030 m

1200m

680 m

800 m

200 m

590m

960m

400 m

770 m

450 m

250 m

400 m

380 m

850m

330 m

380 m

2100m

310 m

1130 m

Chapter 4

Testing NU principles on Egyptian New Cities

spatially undiversified – repeated housing prototypes

Ranges from 250 m to 2100 m

  • Achieved

Ranges from 200 m to 1130 m

On City level, not achieved on block level

  • Repeated housing prototypes – not enough uses

Ranges from 370 m to 750 m

On City level, not achieved on block level

spatially undiversified – housing prototypes

On City level, not achieved on block level

Mixed uses – repeated housing prototypes

  • Ranges from 310 m to 400 m
slide24

Chapter 4

Testing NU principles on Egyptian New Cities

slide25

Chapter 5

NU Principles’ Appropriating Process

+ Field Survey

slide26

Chapter 5

NU Principles’ Appropriating Process

slide27

Chapter 6

Conclusions and Recommendations

Already applied principles

Applicable principles

Principles don’t need adaptations

Principles don’t need adaptations

Not Applicable principles

New Urbanism Principles’ Appropriating Process

Principles need adaptations