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Social-Emotional-Intellectual learning: Bio-social Perspective. Silas Pinto, Ph.D. October 3, 2011 Silas.pinto@tufts.edu. Presentation outline:. Today’s Presentation? Provide an overview of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) Expand on understanding of SEL…

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social emotional intellectual learning bio social perspective

Social-Emotional-Intellectual learning: Bio-social Perspective

Silas Pinto, Ph.D.

October 3, 2011

Silas.pinto@tufts.edu

presentation outline
Presentation outline:
  • Today’s Presentation?
  • Provide an overview of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL)
  • Expand on understanding of SEL…
      • The biological basis of emotional learning
      • Ethnic enclaves model as a component of social learning
exercise
Exercise

Write your own understanding or definitions of:

  •    emotions/feelings
  •    emotional intelligence
  •    social learning
historical perspective
Historical Perspective
  • Robert Thorndike (1930s) was writing about social intelligence.
  • David Weschsler (1940s) proposed non-intellective and intellective elements of intelligence, (affective , personal and social). He was proposing that the non-intellective abilities are essential for predicting one’s ability to succeed.
  • Gardner (1983) – argued for a new view of non-hierarchically arranged primary mental abilities called multiple intelligences. Further elaborated by Armstrong.
  • Salovey and Mayer (1990) – first used the term Emotional Intelligence. They view EQ as a set of skills hypothesized to contribute to the accurate appraisal and expression of emotion in oneself and others, the effective regulation of emotion in self and others, and the use of feelings to motivate, plan and achieve in one’s life.
  • Goleman(1995) – defines EQ as …being able to read another’s innermost feelings; to handle relationships smoothly.

“SEL a set of abilities that helps us get along in life with other people in all kinds of life situations”. It the ‘missing piece in American education’. Maurice Elias.

definitions
Definitions

What are emotions?

  • Biologically driven, cross-cultural responses to environmental stimuli.
  • Emotions are our most reliable indicators of how things are going in our lives; they help keep us on the right track by making sure that we are led by more than cognition.

Teaching and learning are not only concerned with knowledge, cognition and skill. They are also emotional practices”

(Hargreaves, 1998)

slide8

ETHNIC ENCLAVESWhat’s an Ethnic Enclave?What purpose does it serve?What are the strengths and challenges of working with people who live within ethnic enclaves?

Biologically driven, cross-cultural responses to environmental stimuli.

GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

James Banks (knowledge, care, act)

slide9

“Our social interactions play a role in reshaping our brain, through “neuroplasticity”, which means that repeated experiences sculpt the shape, size, and number of neurons and their synaptic connection.

By repeatedly driving our brain into a given register, our key relationships can gradually mold certain neural circuitry. In effect, being chronically hurt and angered, or being emotionally nourished by someone we spend time with daily over the course of years can refashion the brain.”

Daniel Goleman

most of us probably agree that sel is relevant to our work because it
Most of us probably agree that SEL is relevant to our work because it…

- Relationships provide a foundation for learning

- Emotions affect how and what we learn.

- Positive effects on academic performance, health, relationships and citizenship.

  • Essential for life –long success.

Who’s responsible for delivering this “education”?

are we meeting our goals
Are We Meeting Our Goals?

How are you accounting for the social-emotional development differences in your classroom?

  • Goal 1: Developing self-awareness and self-management skills to achieve success.
  • Goal 2: Using social-awareness and interpersonal skills to establish and maintain positive relationships.
  • Goal 3: Demonstrating decision-making skills and responsible behaviors in personal, school, and community contexts
emotionally intelligent teaching
Emotionally Intelligent Teaching

Emotionally intelligent Teaching:

  1) Acknowledging our feelings (and clearing them out) so that they do not interfere with our thinking.

-- Address the myth of restoring objectivity.

-- Teacher v. Instructor

       2) Listening to the child- paying attention to the emotional message beneath the words so that we can respond to the child's hurt and not just to the words or behaviour resulting from the hurt.

3) Teaching children how to correctly identify and label their feelings and other’s feelings. This means teaching the feeling words and the variations of these such as frustration, excitement, etc., and to identify the real origin of these feelings.

activity applying the sel skills
Activity- applying the SEL skills

4 Questions to ask about an event:

  • How was each person feeling? (perception of emotions).
  • What were you and the other person(s) thinking about as a result of these feelings? (emotions influence how we think.)
  • What caused each person to feel the way he/she did? (understanding emotions).
  • What did you and the other person(s) do to manage these emotions? (managing emotions).
what do teachers do well
What Do Teachers Do Well

Instruction

Classroom Teaching & Enrichment

Successful

Youth

a question
A question…

Instruction

Classroom Teaching & Enrichment

  • How many students come to class every day completely ready to hear what you have prepared with nothing preventing them from giving you their full attention?

Successful

Youth

barriers to learning model
Barriers to Learning Model

Instruction

Classroom Teaching & Enrichment

Group 1

Motivationally ready and able to learn

  • The % of students who come ready and able to learn varies from 0-75%
  • The number is decreasing every year

Successful

Youth

group 2
Group 2

Instruction

Classroom Teaching & Enrichment

Group 1

Motivationally ready and able to learn

Group 2

Encounters some barriers

Successful

Youth

  • Group 2
    • Lacking prerequisite skills & knowledge
    • Different learning styles & rates
    • Minor vulnerabilities
group 3
Group 3

Instruction

Classroom Teaching & Enrichment

Group 1

Motivationally ready and able to learn

Group 2

Encounters some barriers

Successful

Youth

Group 3

Encounters many barriers

(SOME OF WHICH CANNOT BE ELIMINATED)

  • Group 3
    • Highly deficient in current capabilities
    • May have a differing ability
barriers to learning
Barriers to Learning

Instruction

Classroom Teaching & Enrichment

Group 1

Motivationally ready and able to learn

Group 2

Encounters some barriers

Successful

Youth

Barriers to Learning

Group 3

Encounters many barriers

ON YOUR PAPER…

Please list 10 possible barriers to the child’s learning

be in the student s frontal lobe but don t take away their need to think
BE IN THE STUDENT’S FRONTAL LOBE… BUT DON’T TAKE AWAY THEIR NEED TO THINK…

Let’s analyze this from the components of operant conditioning…

Punishment

Positive Reinforcement

Negative Reinforcement

a classic sel meta cognitive model
A Classic SEL “Meta-Cognitive” Model
  • STOP, CALM DOWN, & THINK before you act
  • Say thePROBLEMand how youFEEL
  • Set aPOSITIVE GOAL
  • Think of lots ofSOLUTIONS
  • Think ahead to theCONSEQUENCES
  • GO ahead and TRY theBEST PLAN

Reinforce good decision making

(which is different from “The RIGHT CHOICE”)

for you the teacher administrator
For you (the teacher/administrator)
  • Watch your language (verbal and non-verbal)
  • Watch your energy!
  • Think through your approach to “infractions”…
  • Be mindful of how you criticize…
  • Be mindful of your tone!
  • Ask for help… consult with other professionals.
  • Don’t cast judgment
  • Synergize “Education” and “School”
  • Set goals and evaluate
for your students
For your students…
  • Create challenging and engaging curriculum
  • Create a safe, supportive learning community with respectful relationships and trust (THROUGH Validation of students’ strengths)
  • Adopt a multiple intelligences approach to your teaching and school
  • Use Evidence-based SEL classroom instruction
        • I.e. Superflex, Strong start or Second Step
  • Infuse SEL concepts throughout the regular academic curriculum
  • Engaging students actively in the learning process during and outside of school
  • Create opportunities for participation, collaboration, and service
  • Involve families and surrounding community
  • Model Empathy and Understanding
  • Set goals and evaluate
where can happen
Where can happen?

Front office

Hallways

Playground

Teacher’s Lounge

Bus

Virtually everywhere

Lunchroom

SportingEvents

Classrooms

Afterschool/

Extra-curriculars

Bathrooms

Parent/teacher conferences