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Chapter Six, Section One
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  1. Chapter Six, Section One

  2. How Congress is Organized

  3. “the First Branch of this Government”

  4. The U.S. Congress • The “Legislative Branch” of the U.S. Government • Consists of 535 members in a two house (“bicameral”) system. • “House of Representatives” and “Senate”

  5. The U.S. Congress • Each session begins on January 3rd (of odd numbered years) • We currently have the “111th Congress, 1st Session” • Main duty is to make laws for the nation.

  6. “U.S. House of Representatives” • The “lower house” • Consists of 435 members • Membership based on population (each state gets at least one) • 2 Year Terms • Focused on the concerns of theirlocal “constituents” (people they represent)

  7. “U.S. House of Representatives” • State populations are based on a 10 year “census” (population count) given by the U.S. Census Bureau • States may gain or lose representatives based on the “census”.

  8. “U.S. House of Representatives” • “Congressional districts” are created in each state to create boundaries to give roughly the same number of “constitutents” (people represented) in each area.

  9. “U.S. House of Representatives” • “Gerrymandering” is the process of creating oddly shaped districts to increase the voting strength of a particular group. • Florida (especially in the northeast) has been accused of this in the past.

  10. “U.S. House of Representatives” • Tallahassee and Leon County are currently in the “2nd Congressional District” in Florida. • We are represented by Allen Boyd (D)

  11. “U.S. Senate” • The “upper house” • Consists of 100 members • Membership based on 2 per state. • 6 Year Terms (only 1/3 can be up for re-election at one time) • Focused on the concerns of theirstate “constituents” (people they represent)

  12. “U.S. Senate” • Florida is currently represented in the U.S. Senate by Sen. George LeMieux (R)

  13. “U.S. Senate” • Florida is currently represented in the U.S. Senate by Sen. Bill Nelson (D)

  14. Congressional Leadership

  15. Controlling Congress • In the Congress, political parties control each house. • The “majority party” is the party with more than ½ of the membership within their party in that house (other is the “minority party”)

  16. Controlling Congress • Each “majority party” has a majority leader, who has the task of pushing party issues on the floor of each house. • Assisted by the “majority whip”

  17. Democratic Control • In 2009, the Democratic Party controls BOTH the House of Representatives and the Senate. • As well, the Democrats also control the White House

  18. House Leadership

  19. “Speaker of the House” • This is the most powerful position in the House (3rd in line for presidency) • Main task is to steer legislation and keep control of any debates on the House floor. • Also pushes the agenda of the majority party.

  20. “Speaker of the House” • The current speaker is Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D) from California

  21. House Majority Leader • The current majority leader of the House of Representatives is Rep. Steny Hoyer (D) of Maryland

  22. House Majority “Whip” • The current majority “whip” of the House of Representatives is Rep. James Clyburn (D) of South Carolina

  23. House Minority Leader • The current minority leader of the House of Representatives is Rep. John Boehner (R) of Ohio

  24. House Minority “Whip” • The current minority “whip” of the House of Representatives is Rep. Eric Cantor (R) of Virginia

  25. Senate Leadership

  26. Senate Leadership • The “chairperson” of the Senate is the “president pro tempore” (or “Senate Pro Tem”) • “Pro Tempore” means “for the time being” • More ceremonial than influential (but is 4th in line for presidency)

  27. “Senate Pro Tempore” • The current “pro tem” of the Senate is Sen. Robert Byrd (D) of West Virginia

  28. Role of the Vice President • The Vice President is technically the presiding officer of the Senate. • They rarely attend debates and only vote in the event of a tie.

  29. Role of the Vice President • The Senate will be presided over by Vice-President Joseph Biden (D)

  30. Senate Majority Leader • The current majority leader of the Senate is Sen. Harry Reid (D) of Nevada.

  31. Senate Majority “Whip” • The current majority “whip” of the Senate is Sen. Richard Durbin (D) of Illinois.

  32. Senate Minority Leader • The current minority leader of the Senate is Sen. Mitch McConnell (R) of Kentucky

  33. Senate Minority “Whip” • The current minority “whip” of the Senate is Sen. Jon Kyl (R) of Arizona

  34. Congressional Committees

  35. Congressional Committees • “Congressional committees” are like mini-legislatures to divide up the work. • There are four main types of Congressional committees.

  36. Congressional Committees • Placement on a committee is determined by the majority leadership. • “Seniority” (years of service) often dictate who gets on these committees, as well as the leadership positions themselves.

  37. “Standing Committees” • “Standing committees” are permanent committees that continue to work from session to session. • The Senate has 16 and the House has 19 “standing committees”

  38. “Select Committees” • “Select committees” are committees created to do a special job for a limited period of time. • Homeland security, ethics, Indian affairs, etc.

  39. “Joint Committees” • “Joint committees” include members from both houses who work together on issues. • The four “joint committees” are Economic, Printing, Taxation, and Library.

  40. “Conference Committees” • “Conference committees” helps the House and Senate agree on the details of a proposed law. • These committees are temporary.