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Advances in School Counseling: New Paradigms, Programs, and Preparation. Gary L. Troxell, Ed.D Lancaster Bible College Kevin Wilkerson, Ph.D. Co-Director- School Counseling Program University of Scranton. Presentation Objectives. Introductions School Counseling (R)evolution

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advances in school counseling new paradigms programs and preparation

Advances in School Counseling: New Paradigms, Programs, and Preparation

Gary L. Troxell, Ed.D

Lancaster Bible College

Kevin Wilkerson, Ph.D.

Co-Director- School Counseling Program

University of Scranton

presentation objectives
Presentation Objectives
  • Introductions
  • School Counseling (R)evolution
  • New Paradigms, Programs, and Preparation
    • Illustrations
  • Looking Ahead
    • Resources
    • What next?
  • Questions and Comments
introductions
Introductions
  • A little about us
  • A little about you
  • Brief professional examples of best practices in School Counseling
school counseling r evolution
School Counseling (R)evolution
  • ASCA National Standards for Students (1997) http://ascamodel.timberlakepublishing.com/files/NationalStandards.pdf
  • ASCA National Model (2003, 2005) http://www.schoolcounselor.org/files/Natl%20Model%20Exec%20Summary_final.pdf
  • ASCA School Counselor Competencies http://www.schoolcounselor.org/files/SCCompetencies.pdf
  • Evidence-Based Practice for School Counselors
typical student focused school counseling program activities
Typical Student-Focused School Counseling Program Activities

Bully

Proofing

Program

Tutoring

Mentoring

Students

Random Acts of Guidance

Individual

Counseling

Small

Group

Study

Skills

Group

Classroom

Guidance

Behavior

Management

Ready! Fire! AIM!

Phone

Contact

intentional student focused school counseling programs
Intentional Student-Focused School Counseling Programs

Bully

Proofing

Program

Tutoring

70% Attendance Rate for

Low SES Students

Mentoring

Students

Individual

Counseling

Small

Group

Data Driven Priorities

Study

Skills

Group

Classroom

Guidance

Behavior

Management

Phone

Contact

intentional and integrated student focused school counseling programs
Intentional and Integrated Student-Focused School Counseling Programs

Bully

Proofing

Program

EVIDENCE

POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE

CONTINGENCY MANAGEMENT

(token economies, tangible

rewards, behavioral contracting)

Sutven, R.P., Ford, J.P., Flaherty, C. (2010).

70% Attendance Rate for

Low SES Students

Mentoring

Students

Data-Driven Priorities

AND EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE

Individual

Counseling

Small

Group

Study

Skills

Group

Classroom

Guidance

Behavior

Management

Phone

Contact

intentional and integrated student focused interventions
Intentional and Integrated Student Focused Interventions

Interventions IDENTIFIED, EVALUATED, EMPIRCIALLY SUPPORTED, AND designed to directly help students gain knowledge and skills in the areas of academic, career, and personal/social development in order to help them better navigate the educational system

system focused school counseling programs
System-Focused School Counseling Programs

Review

School

Structure

Advocate

For

Change

Lead

Task

Force

Student

Focus

Groups

Disaggregate

Data By

???

Review

School

Policies

Advocate

for

Task

Force

Team

With

Parents &

Community

Review

Practices

intentional system focused school counseling programs
Intentional System-Focused School Counseling Programs

Review

School

Structure

Advocate

For

Change

70% Attendance Rate for

Low SES Students

Lead

Task

Force

Student

Focus

Groups

Disaggregate

Data By

???

Data-Driven Priorities

Review

School

Policies

Advocate

for

Task

Force

Team

With

Parents &

Community

Review

Practices

intentional and integrated system focused counseling programs
Intentional and Integrated System-Focused Counseling Programs

Review

School

Structure

Advocate

For

Change

SCHOOL, COMMUNITY AND

FAMILY INVOVLEMENT

Sheldon, S.B. (2007).

70% Attendance Rate for

Low SES Students

Data-Driven Priorities

AND EVIDENCE BASED

Lead

Task

Force

Student

Focus

Groups

Disaggregate

Data By

???

Review

School

Policies

Advocate

for

Task

Force

Team

With

Parents &

Community

Review

Practices

intentional and integrated system focused interventions
Intentional and Integrated System Focused Interventions

Interventions IDENTIFIED, EVALUATED, EMPIRICALLY SUPPORTED, AND designed to help the system (school) change in order to better meet the needs of the students.

Examples:

  • Change educator attitudes, expectations, & priorities
  • Reduce adult resistance to change
  • Change policy
  • Change practice
how can school counselors do this work
How Can School Counselors Do This Work?
  • Creating data-driven, evidence-based school counseling programs aligned with the school’s improvement planserves students better
  • Taking a leadership role in schools helps bring about systemic change and alter student outcomes
evidenced based practice
Evidenced-Based Practice

References: American School Counselor Association. (2003); Dimmitt, C, Carey, J. & Hatch, T. (2007).

continuum of strategies rtii approaches
Continuum of Strategies (RTII approaches)

DATA

ACTION PLAN

All Students

Large group/

Classroom

Some Students

Small Group

Few Students

Individual

A Student

Referral

transcript analysis

Transcript Analysis

Identifying patterns in our own data to determine whether all of our students are participating in courses that will prepare them for college and careers

slide20

Percent of Students Behind, Proficient and

Advanced in Math

Note: The level of proficiency is defined by the course the students are in. For example, in 9th grade a student who is in algebra is considered proficient, a student who is in general math or pre-algebra is considered behind,

and a student in geometry or algebra honors is considered advanced. A student not taking math is also considered behind.

slide21

Average Number of College-Prep Classes

The average should be at least 4.5 to be on trajectory to be College Ready graduation.

Note: The level of proficiency is defined by the course the students are in. For example, in 9th grade a student who is in algebra is considered proficient, a student who is in general math or pre-algebra is considered behind,

and a student in geometry or algebra honors is considered advanced. A student not taking math is also considered behind.

master schedule analysis

Master Schedule Analysis

Identifying patterns in course offerings, teacher distribution, class sizes, and time efficiency in our schedules

examination of the master schedule analysis
Examination of the Master Schedule Analysis

Look for:

  • Patterns in these charts and what they indicate
  • Changes you may implement to ensure that students have access to career and college-ready courses and support
slide24

Enrollment:

~ 1,800

Of all math classes, what percent of them are 9th grade classes?

slide25

Percent of Courses that are College Prep

Of all science classes, what percent of them are college-prep classes?

slide27

A Great School Guidance & Counseling Program

Key Points

A written mission statement exists and is used as a foundation by all counselors.

Services are organized so that all students are well served and have access to them.

The program operates from a plan for closing the achievement gap for minority and lower income students.

References: American School Counselor Association. (2003); Dimmitt, C, Carey, J. & Hatch, T. (2007).

slide28

A Great School Guidance & Counseling Program

Key Points

The program has a set of clear measurable student learning goals and objectives established for academic, personal/social skills, and career development.

Needs assessments are completed regularly and guide program planning.

All student receive classroom guidance lessons designed to promote academic, social/personal, and career development.

References: American School Counselor Association. (2003); Dimmitt, C, Carey, J. & Hatch, T. (2007).

slide29

A Great School Guidance & Counseling Program

Key Points

The program ensures that all students have academic plans that include testing, individual advisement, long-term planning, and placement.

The program has an effective referral and follow-up system for handling student crises.

School counselors use student performance data to decide how to meet student needs.

References: American School Counselor Association. (2003); Dimmitt, C, Carey, J. & Hatch, T. (2007).

slide30

A Great School Guidance & Counseling Program

Key Points

School counselors analyze student data by ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic level to identify interventions to close achievement gaps.

School counselor job descriptions match actual duties.

School counselors spend at least 80% of their time in activities that directly benefit students.

References: American School Counselor Association. (2003); Dimmitt, C, Carey, J. & Hatch, T. (2007).

slide31

A Great School Guidance & Counseling Program

Key Points

The school counseling program includes interventions designed to improve the school’s ability to educate all students to high standards.

An annual review is conducted to get information for improving next year’s programs.

School counselors use computer software to: (a) access student data; (b) analyze student data, and; (c) use data for school improvement.

References: American School Counselor Association. (2003); Dimmitt, C, Carey, J. & Hatch, T. (2007).

slide32

A Great School Guidance & Counseling Program

Key Points

The school counseling program has the resources to allow counselors to complete appropriate professional development activities.

School counseling priorities are represented on curriculum and education committees.

School counselors communicate with parents to coordinate student achievement and gain feedback for program development.

References: American School Counselor Association. (2003); Dimmitt, C, Carey, J. & Hatch, T. (2007).

what next
What Next?
  • Change hiring practices
    • Look for SC’s who can articulate a new vision for School Counseling
    • Introduce new interview questions
      • “How do you determine the impact of your work?”
      • “What processes do you use to identify achievement gaps and remove barriers to learning?
  • Conduct serious program audits and assessments
  • Rethink School Counselor professional development
questions and comments
Questions and Comments
  • Today’s Pp presentation will be available at www.papsa-web.org
  • E-mail addresses
    • Gary- gtroxell@lbc.edu
    • Kevin- wilkersonk2@scranton.edu
resources
Resources

American School Counselor Association. (2003). The ASCA National Model: A framework for school counseling programs. Alexandria, VA: Author.

Dimmitt, C, Carey, J. & Hatch, T. (2007). Evidenced-based school counseling. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

The Education Trust - NCTSC (National Center for Transforming School Counseling )