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Construction Materials Mechanical Properties. TED 316 – Structural Design. Engineers and architects need to be knowledgeable of mechanical properties to: Select most appropriate materials Most economical for the job Under all potential conditions and loads. Structural properties. Physical

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Presentation Transcript
structural properties

Engineers and architects need to be knowledgeable of mechanical properties to:

    • Select most appropriate materials
    • Most economical for the job
    • Under all potential conditions and loads
Structural properties
mechanical properties groups

Physical

    • Shape, Size, Density, Specific Gravity
  • Mechanical
    • Strength, Elasticity, Plasticity, Hardness, Toughness, Ductility, Brittleness, Creep, Stiffness, Fatigue, Impact Strength, Compression and Tensile Strength
  • Thermal
    • Thermal conductivity, Thermal resistivity, Thermal capacity
Mechanical properties groups
mechanical properties groups1

Chemical

    • Corrosion resistance, Chemical composition, Acidity, Alkalinity
  • Optical
    • Colour, Light reflection, Light transmission etc.,
  • Acoustical
    • Sound absorption, Transmission and Reflection.
  • Physiochemical
    • Hygroscopicity, Shrinkage and Swell due to moisture changes
Mechanical properties groups
mechanical properties definitions

Density: It is defined as mass per unit volume. It is expressed as kg/m3.

Specific gravity: It is the ratio of density of a material to density of water.

Porosity: The term porosity is used to indicate the degree by which the volume of a material is occupied by pores. It is expressed as a ratio of volume of pores to that of the specimen.

Strength: Strength of a material has been defined as its ability to resist the action of an external force without breaking.

Mechanical properties definitions
mechanical properties definitions1

Elasticity: It is the property of a material which enables it to regain its original shape and size after the removal of external load.

Compressive strength is the capacity of a material or structure to withstand axially directed pushing forces. When the limit of compressive strength is reached, materials are crushed. Concrete can be made to have high compressive strength.

Tensile Strength(TS) or ultimate strength, is the maximum stress that a material can withstand while being stretched or pulled before necking, which is when the specimen's cross-section starts to significantly contract. Tensile strength is the opposite of compressive strength and the values can be quite different.

Mechanical properties definitions
mechanical properties definitions2

Plasticity: It is the property of the material which enables the formation of permanent deformation.

Hardness: It is the property of the material which enables it to resist abrasion, indentation, machining and scratching.

Ductility: It is the property of a material which enables it to be drawn out or elongated to an appreciable extent before rupture occurs.

Brittleness: It is the property of a material, which is opposite to ductility. Material, having very little property of deformation, either elastic or plastic is called Brittle.

Creep: It is the property of the material which enables it under constant load to deform slowly but progressively over a certain period.

Mechanical properties definitions
mechanical properties definitions3

Stiffness: It is the property of a material which enables it to resist deformation.

Fatigue: The term fatigue is generally referred to the effect of cyclically repeated stress. A material has a tendency to fail at lesser stress level when subjected to repeated loading.

Impact strength: The impact strength of a material is the quantity of work required to cause its failure per its unit volume. It thus indicates the toughness of a material.

Toughness: It is the property of a material which enables it to be twisted, bent or stretched under a high stress before rupture.

Thermal Conductivity: It is the property of a material which allows conduction of heat through its body. It is defined as the amount of heat in kilocalories that will flow through unit area of the material with unit thickness in unit time when difference of temperature on its faces is also unity.

Mechanical properties definitions
mechanical properties definitions4

Corrosion Resistance: It is the property of a material to withstand the action of acids, alkalis gases etc., which tend to corrode (or oxidize).

Hygroscopyis the ability of a substance to attract and hold water molecules from the surrounding environment through either absorption or adsorption with the absorbing or adsorbing material becoming physically 'changed,' somewhat: by an increase in volume, stickiness, or other physical characteristic of the material as water molecules become 'suspended' between the material's molecules in the process.

Mechanical properties definitions
sources

http://theconstructor.org/others/properties-of-construction-materials/18/http://theconstructor.org/others/properties-of-construction-materials/18/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hygroscopy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tensile_strength

sources