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The Lutron RAFT The CLEAR Design Ride

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  1. The Lutron RAFT The CLEAR Design Ride

  2. CLEAR Design Methodologyfor Lighting & Shading Control Systems

  3. The CLEAR Design Methodology • Critical Thinking in System Design • Applications Based Design vs. Product Forward Design • Design follows the Application • Understand the full Application – proceed to apply Design Technique – end with a Parts Specification

  4. CLEAR Design Course Outline • Section 1 – The CLEAR Philosophy • Section 2- The CLEAR Design Process & The “Chief CLEAR Design Guidelines” • Section 3- CLEAR System Design Models • Section 4- Sample Listing of CLEAR Design Techniques • Section 5 – Detailed Listing of CLEAR Design Guidelines

  5. The CLEAR Mission Applications Based Design = ….for the customer!

  6. Section 1 - The CLEAR Philosophy • Teach them how to drive, not how to build the engine • That said, you better build the engine well! (Applications Based Design!)

  7. The CLEAR Balance • The “Button” • The “Column” • The “Keypad” • The cohesive system topology

  8. The CLEAR Balance • Simple & Intuitive • Consistent • Logical • Impact • Relevance in Daily Life Routines

  9. The CLEAR Philosophy • It’s not how you program, it’s what you program (program for your customer) • As it relates to programming, just because you can does not mean you should • “K.I.S.S – Keep It Simple Stupid” • “Less is more!” • Benjamin Franklin’s quote to the Continental Congress

  10. Section 2The CLEAR System Design Process & The “Chief CLEAR Design Guidelines” Design “Holistically,” for The Entire Application, Prior to Considering SKUs

  11. The CLEAR System Design Process The CLEAR System Design Process • Phase 1: Define the Scope of the Project • Identify Functional Light Spaces to be controlled • Phase 2: Investigate Lighting Loads in each Space (See Addendum Presentation) • Control 100% of lighting, within selected Functional Light Space • Phase 3: Choose Control Points • Phase 4: Identify the Optimal Applications, Per Control Point • Phase 5: Construct System Specification Design follows application

  12. Functional Light Space – Kitchen, Dining & Living Area

  13. Design Phase 3: Identify Control Points • From where will people enter & exit this space? • Once in the space, what are the primary activities? • From where within the room, specifically, is the space used for said activities? • Consider Visual Atmosphere – Mood – Activity ….or backwards (Spatial Application)

  14. Design Phase 4Optimal Applications- Per Control Point Critical Thinking in System Design Simplicity in Keypad Design

  15. Button Application Types

  16. Shade Button Types

  17. The Chief CLEAR Design Guidelines The CLEAR System Design Process • Chief Guideline #1: Place “Local Scene Keypads” at Room Entry, controlling all local lighting. Top button “Bright,” as you go down, light levels decrease, bottom button “Off.” Local Scene Room Entry KPs are “Light Switch Replacements” and therefore must carry very low fade times. User is entering the room from darkness and requires light quickly and intuitively. Keypad should be intuitive and minimalistic. • Chief Guideline #2: Limit Whole Home Scenes and Paths of Light to specific areas. Typically, the Home Entry Exit and the Master Bedside are ideal. • Chief Guidelines #3: Make every attempt to separate “Button Types,” either within the same keypad or as completely separate keypads, in order to avoid confusing LED logic and button functionality/transition.

  18. The Chief CLEAR Design Guidelines The CLEAR System Design Process • Chief Guideline #4: Minimize the number of buttons on keypads. For a wall keypad, two, three and four button configurations – with “Off Raise/Lower” – are acceptable. A three button “spaced” keypad, is easy to use and it is intuitive. Five, six and seven button configurations, should be avoided. Five and ten button table tops are effective. Avoid fifteen buttons. You are not selling a “maximum number of buttons for your dollar” concept. Instead, you are selling a “maximum value and impact of each button and each keypad in real life,” concept. Less is more.

  19. The Chief CLEAR Design Guidelines The CLEAR System Design Process • Chief Guideline #5: Attempt to use the same button names, in the exact same positions on a keypad, as much as possible, across all like application system keypads. Furthermore, attempt to utilize the same keypad configuration as well, for like application keypads. • This Design Guideline will promote repetitive motor function learning (mental redundancy). If the keypad is engraved “Bright – Ambiance – Off” – for many of the room entry keypads, then the user will become familiar with the layout and the function. Over time, using it will become instinct. The user will become confident, that when he or she enters a room from darkness and strikes the keypad on the wall, that lights will turn on – and to their general preference. No delays. No “process.” Still, scene light levels and light effect, can be customized per room, as long as the “naming and overall concept” remains constant. This technique prevents having too many customized keypad layouts, throughout the home.

  20. The Chief CLEAR Design Guidelines The CLEAR System Design Process • Chief Guideline #6: In the case of local scene keypads, in rooms which may contain “customized” scene names, (like the Kitchen, Family Room, Master Bedroom and Bathroom), strive to achieve an underlining consistency and level of intuition – by naming the “top” and “bottom” buttons, “Bright” and “Off,” respectively, or something of that nature. The “customized” scene buttons (one or two at most), for the space, should be in the “middle” of the keypad. Therefore, every Local Scene Room Entry Wall Keypad, at least has a consistent “top” and “bottom” button, with consistent functionality of top button bright – as you go down, light levels lower – bottom button off.

  21. The Chief CLEAR Design Guidelines The CLEAR System Design Process • Chief Guideline #7: Always engraving every button on every keypad!

  22. Section 3 CLEAR Design Models

  23. Model #1 – Kitchen & Dining Room

  24. Dining Room is adjacentand open to Kitchen1 Switch Leg, Suspended “Dish” Down Light Phase 1 – Identify Scope / Functional Light Space

  25. Phase 2, Lighting Investigation • Switch Leg #1: Island Pendants • Task, Decorative • Switch Leg #2: Perimeter Recessed Cans • Ambient • Switch Leg #3: Under Cabinet Backsplash • Task, Accent

  26. Phase 2, Lighting Investigation • Switch Leg #4: Over Stove Backsplash • Task, Accent • Switch Leg #5: Dining Down Light • Task, Decorative

  27. Phase 2, Lighting Investigation • Switch Leg #1: Island Pendants • Light Source Technology: Incandescent/Halogen • Lamp Type: MR16 • Voltage Type / Transformer Type: LV, MLV Transformer • Fixture Angle: Down Lighting

  28. Phase 2, Lighting Investigation • Switch Leg #2: Perimeter Recessed Cans • Light Source Technology: Incandescent/Halogen • Lamp Type: PAR • Voltage Type / Transformer Type: HV • Fixture Angle: Down Lighting

  29. Phase 2, Lighting Investigation • Switch Leg #3: Under Cabinet and Over Cabinet Backsplash • Light Source Technology: Incandescent/Halogen • Lamp Type: Mini Tubular Incandescent • Voltage Type / Transformer Type: LV, MLV Transformer • Fixture Angle: Wall Wash Light Effect

  30. Phase 2, Lighting Investigation • Switch Leg #4: Over Range Backsplash • Light Source Technology: Incandescent/Halogen • Lamp Type: Mini Tubular Incandescent • Voltage Type / Transformer Type: LV, MLV Transformer • Fixture Angle: Wall Wash

  31. Phase 2, Lighting Investigation • Switch Leg #5: Dining Down Light • Light Source Technology: Incandescent • Lamp Type: Candelabra • Voltage Type / Transformer Type: HV • Fixture Angle: Downlight • “Zone #6 and #7:” Kitchen Windows

  32. Phase 3, Identify Control Points • Entry Points • Optional Kitchen Backsplash for Individual Switch Leg control • Dedicated Kitchen Backsplash Control for shades • No sensor scene application. Mobile device may be used. Time Clock Application limited to Security.

  33. Phase 4, Applications Per Control Point • Bright • Absolute state of Light • Cooking • Activity based Light State • High Task Light Levels • Medium-High Ambient Light Levels Scenes include Dining Room Down Light switch leg

  34. Phase 4, Applications Per Control Point • Dining • Activity based Light State • Low-Medium Pleasant Ambient Light Levels • Optional Accent • Sufficient Task Lighting over Table • Soft • Absolute Light state • Room Off • Absolute Light State Scenes include Dining Room Down Light switch leg

  35. Phase 4, Applications Per Control Point • Individual Switch Leg control from Kitchen Backsplash device • Dedicated Kitchen Backsplash Control for shades • No Pathways, no Multi-Room Scenes and no Room Monitoring KP column, unless remotely from Mobile Device.

  36. Phase 5 – System Specification, RadioRA2 Phase 5 will be expressed in a series of “Design Exhibits”

  37. Exhibit 1Kitchen Rough Electrical PlanMajor Remodel Cabinet Accent Range Accent Remotely Mounted Recessed Cans Pendants *Note: Dining Area Switch Leg on local dimmer Room Entrance Wall Keypads, for the same room, should be identical

  38. Exhibit 1 – Kitchen Major Remodel – Entrance KPs Bright Cooking • Coming in from “darkness” / Lights on and fast! • Short fade times (2 seconds) • Simple activity based Local Scenes • Top button bright, as you go down, light levels lower (intuitive!) Dining Soft RoomOff

  39. Exhibit 1 – Kitchen Major Remodel – Entrance KPs Bright Cooking • Bottom button “Room Off,” with separation from “Ons” (the brain is looking for “off” at the bottom of the Keypad) • Single Action / Light Level Sensitive Dining Soft RoomOff

  40. Exhibit 1 – Kitchen Major Remodel – Entrance KPs Bright Cooking • Raise/Lower “fixed” to entire room • This KP design topology must remain consistent throughout the home Dining Soft RoomOff

  41. Exhibit 1 – Kitchen Shade “Group” Control from BacksplashWallbox “Left” Side of Window Open Preset Close Absolute Shade State Buttons, controlling both adjacent shades simultaneously Top button “open” as you go down shade is “closing” Bottom button “close”

  42. Exhibit 1 – Kitchen Shade “Group” Control from BacksplashWallbox “Left” Side of Window Open Preset Close Single Action / Light Level Sensitive Open/Stop/Continue/Stop Raise/Lower both shades

  43. Exhibit 1 – Kitchen Individual Switch Leg Control from BacksplashWallbox “Right” Side of Window Pendants Cans Cabinet Range Room Off Individual Switch Leg Control Toggle individual Switch Legs

  44. Exhibit 1 – Kitchen Individual Switch Leg Control from BacksplashWallbox “Right” Side of Window Pendants Cans Cabinet Range Room Off Short fade times (2 seconds) Light Level In-Sensitive “Room Off” consistent with entry KPs (not really required/inconsistent with others)

  45. Exhibit 1 – Kitchen Individual Switch Leg Control from BacksplashWallbox “Right” Side of Window Pendants Cans Cabinet Range Room Off Raise/Lower Individual Switch Legs or Room, based on Last Button Double Pressed Individual Switch Legs physically located in closet with Local Dimmers or Wall Box Power Module

  46. Exhibit 2Kitchen Rough Electrical PlanRetrofit Cabinet Accent Range Accent $ Recessed Cans Pendants *Note: Dining Area Switch Leg on local dimmer $ Nice way to “get rid” of RD-RD $ $ $ $

  47. Exhibit 2 – Kitchen Retrofit– Entrance KPs • The retrofit “challenge” with Individual Switch Leg Control and Hybrid KPs • Three-Way Switch Leg, 1 HP / 1 Standard KP Bright Cooking Dining Important Space! RoomOff Cans Logical “Dimmer”

  48. Exhibit 2 – Kitchen Retrofit– Entrance KPs • First four Buttons: • Simple activity based local scenes • Top button bright, as you go down, light levels lower • Short fade times (2 seconds) • Fourth button is “Room Off” • Single Action / Light Level Sensitive Bright Cooking Dining Important Space! RoomOff Cans Logical “Dimmer”