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Gender and Poverty Webinar Thursday February 9, 2012 Speaker: Amboka Wameyo, World Vision Canada PowerPoint Presentation
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Gender and Poverty Webinar Thursday February 9, 2012 Speaker: Amboka Wameyo, World Vision Canada. Introductions Bruce Peninsula District School Lion’s Head, Ontario C.W. Jefferys Collegiate Toronto, Ontario Nanaimo District Secondary Nanaimo, British Columbia Amboka Wameyo, World Vision

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slide1

Gender and Poverty Webinar

Thursday February 9, 2012

Speaker: Amboka Wameyo, World Vision Canada

slide2

Introductions

Bruce Peninsula District School

Lion’s Head, Ontario

C.W. Jefferys Collegiate

Toronto, Ontario

Nanaimo District Secondary

Nanaimo, British Columbia

Amboka Wameyo, World Vision

Tanzania/Kenya

slide5

What Happens When Girls Don’t Get a Chance?

  • Approx 25% of girls in developing countries are not in school.
  • In 2009 around 35 million girls were out of school compared to 31 million boys.
  • Almost ½ of the world’s out of school girls are in Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Around ¼ are in South Asia.
  • One girl in 7 in developing countries marries by age fifteen. 38 % marry by age 18.
  • 25 to 50% of girls in developing countries are mothers before age 18.
  • Pregnancy is the leading cause of death among girls aged 15 to 19 worldwide.
  • 75% of HIV-infected youth in Africa are girls.
  • Sources:
  • The Mother and Child Health and Education Trust website
  • The World Bank: Girl’s Education
  • Center for Gender Equity: “Keeping The Promise : Five Benefits of Girls’ Secondary Education” (May Rihani, 2006)
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What Happens When We Invest in Girls Education?

  • When a girl in the developing world receives 7+ years of education,
  • she marries 4 years later, and has 2.2 fewer children.
  • An extra year of primary school boosts a girl’s eventual wages by 10-20 %,
  • an extra year of secondary school by 15-25 %.
  • When you educate a girl you educate her family as well.
  • 90 % of income earned by women and girls is invested back into their families,
  • compared to 30-40 % for men.
  • Five Main Benefits of Providing Secondary Education for Girls
  • 1. Increased primary school enrollment and completion.
  • 2. Social benefits such as higher economic growth, better health care and education.
  • 3. Adult women have healthier children.
  • 4. Prevention strategy against HIV and AIDS.
  • 5. A tool for poverty alleviation.
slide8

Grace (5 years old)

Daniel (5 years old)

  • Value of girls (cultural preference)
  • Gender selection
  • Terms defined: gender equality and gender
  • based discrimination
slide9

Grace (10 years old)

Daniel (10 years old)

  • Domestic roles/chores
  • Access to primary education
  • (parity at enrolment and in primary school)
slide11

Grace (teen)

Daniel (teen)

  • Early forced marriage/poverty
  • Circumcision and initiation into adulthood (clear gender roles)
  • Conflict
  • Secondary Education/Employment
  • “Choice” vs. Necessity
  • Rural vs. Urban
  • Participation and voice
slide12

Grace (adult)

Daniel (adult)

  • Child birth (number, spacing, health)
  • effects of HIV and AIDS
  • Labour/employment
  • Differentiation of roles (women’s responsibilities for
  • food security, children’s health, water, etc.)
  • Inheritance of land and family wealth
  • Voice and agency (community, political power)
slide14

World Vision Interventions and Gender Programming

  • Awareness campaigns for gender equality
  • Changing cultural attitudes and perceptions of women
  • Child and maternal health programs
  • Early marriage interventions (attitudes and laws)
  • Access to education: formal and non-formal
  • Advocacy with communities and governments (child parliaments)
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Further Resources:

World Vision CONNECT Resources: The Girl Factor

www.worldvision.ca/connect/teachers

Because I am a Girl: Plan Canada campaign

www.becauseiamagirl.ca

World Bank: Girl’s Education website

www.worldbank.org/education/girls

The Female Factor: New York Times series

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/world/series/the_female_factor/index.html

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Thank You!

Join our next Live Webinar

Child Protection in Haiti, Monday March 5, 12 noon to 1 p.m. (EDT)

with Carleen McGuinty, WVC Child Protection Specialist

Contact

Nancy Del Col and Hoa Truong-White, WVC Global Education Team

Global_ed@worldvision.ca