Download
three approaches to language learning for academic purposes diane belcher georgia state university n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Abstract PowerPoint Presentation

Abstract

115 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Abstract

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Three Approaches to Language Learning for Academic PurposesDiane Belcher, Georgia State University Abstract This presentation will offer an overview of three approaches to teaching English for use in university-level study: Theories and research that can provide a rationale for (1) the sustained content-based approach,(2) English for general academic purposes,and (3) discourse community initiation: a portfolio-based approach as well as guidance in the use of each of these approaches will be presented. The advantages and disadvantages for instructors who design materials for and implement these instructional strategies will also be discussed. Some action research possibilities will be suggested.

  2. Coxhead’s Academic Word List, 570 word families from 28 content areas, an academic corpus of 3,500,000 words: http://www.victoria.ac.nz/lals/resources/academicwordlist/default.aspx

  3. MICASE http://micase.elicorpora.info/ • MICUSP http://micusp.elicorpora.info/

  4. Joel Bloch’s discipline-specific assignments: http://www.esl.ohio-state.edu/Staff/Bloch/Home.html Compleat Lexical Tutor: http://www.lextutor.ca/

  5. SCBI References • Brinton, D., & Jensen, L. (2002). Appropriating the adjunct model: English for academic purposes at the university level. In J. Crandall & D. Kaufman (Eds.), Content-based instruction in higher education settings (pp. 125-138). Alexandria, VA: TESOL. • Brinton, D., & Master, P. (Eds.) (1997). New ways in content-based instruction. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. • Carson, J. (2000). Reading and writing for academic purposes. In M. Pally (Ed.), Sustained content teaching in academic ESL/EFL (pp. 19-34). Boston: Houghton Mifflin. • Carson, J. (2001). A task analysis of reading and writing in academic contexts. In D. Belcher & A. Hirvela (Eds.), Linking literacies: Perspectives on L2 reading-writing connections (pp. 48-83). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. • Carson, J., Cavusgil, S., & Snell, D. (unpublished paper). Developing an academic ESL program. • Carson, J., Chase, N., Gibson, S., & Hargrove, M. (1992). Literacy demands of the undergraduate curriculum. Reading Research and Instruction, 31.4, 25-50. • Crandall, J.A. & Kaufman, D. (Eds.) (2003). Content-based instruction in higher education settings. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. • Folse, K. (2004). Vocabulary myths: Applying second language research to classroom teaching. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. • Grabe, W. (2009). Reading in a second language: Moving from theory to practice. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. • Johns, A. (1997). Text, role and context: Developing academic literacies. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. • Kaufman, D. & Crandall, J. A. (eds.) (2005). Content-based instruction in elementary and secondary school settings. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. • Stoller, F. (2002). Promoting the acquisition of knowledge in a content-based course. In J. Crandall & D. Kaufman (Eds.), Content-based instruction in higher education settings (pp. 109-124). Alexandria, VA: TESOL. • Weigle, S., & Nelson, G. (2001). Academic writing for university examinations. In I. Leki (Ed.), Academic writing programs (pp. 121-136). Alexandria, VA: TESOL.

  6. General EAP References • Bartholomae, D., & Petrosky, A. R. (1986). Facts, artifacts, and counterfacts: Theory and method for a reading and writing course. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Heinemann. • Bartholomae, D., & Petrosky, A. R. (1987). Ways of reading. New York: Bedford Books/St. Martin’s Press. • Belcher, D., & Hirvela, A. (2000). Literature and L2 composition: Revisiting the debate. Journal of Second Language Writing, 9.1, 21-39. • Carson, J. (2001). A task analysis of reading and writing in academic contexts. In D. Belcher & A. Hirvela (Eds.), Linking literacies: Perspectives on L2 reading-writing connections (pp. 48-83). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. • Grabe, W. (2009). Reading in a second language: Moving from theory to practice. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. • Harklau, L., Losey, K., & Siegal, M. (1999). Generation 1.5 meets college composition. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. • Hart, W. (2002). Never fade away. Santa Barbara, CA: Fithian Press. • Hirvela, A. (1990). ESP and literature: A reassessment. English for Specific Purposes, 9, 237-252. • Hirvela, A. (1998). Review of Myra Shulman’s Journeys through literature. English for Specific Purposes, 17, 320-326. • Hirvela, A. (2004). Connecting reading and writing in the second language writing instruction. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. • Hirvela, A. (2007). Computer-mediated communication and the linking of students, text, and author on an ESL writing course listserv, Computers and Composition, 24.1, 36-55. • Johns, A. (1997). Text, role and context: Developing academic literacies. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. • Johns, A. (2009). Tertiary undergraduate EAP: Problems and possibilities. In D. Belcher (Ed.), English for specific purposes in theory and practice(pp. 41-59). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. • Rosenblatt, L. (1938/1976). Literature as exploration. New York: MLA.

  7. Disciplinary Discourse References • Bakhtin, M. (1986). Speech genres and other late essays. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press. • Brandt, D. (1990). Literacy as involvement: The acts of writers. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press. • Braxley, K. (2005). Mastering academic English: International graduate students’ use of dialogue and speech genres to meet the writing demands of graduate school. In J. K. Hall, G. Vitanova, & L. Marchenkova (Eds.), Dialogue with Bakhtin on second and foreign language learning (pp. 11-32). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. • Frodesen, J. (1995). Negotiating the syllabus: A learner-centered, interactive approach to ESL graduate writing course design. In D. Belcher & G. Braine (Eds.), Academic writing in a second language (pp. 331-350). Norwood, NJ: Ablex. • Hirvela, A. (1997). “Disciplinary portfolios” and EAP writing instruction, English for Specific Purposes, 16, 83-100. • Hyland, K. (2004). Genre and second language writing. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. • Hyland, K. (2004). Disciplinary discourses. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. • Jiang, X., & Grabe, W. (2007). Graphic organizers in reading instruction: Research finding and issues. Reading in a Foreign Language, 19(1), 34-55. • Johns, A. (1995). Teaching classroom and authentic genres: Initiating students into academic cultures and discourses. In D. Belcher & G. Braine (Eds.), Academic writing in a second language (pp. 277-291). Norwood, NJ: Ablex. • Johns, A. (1997). Text, role, and context: Developing academic literacies. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. • Lee, D., & Swales, J. (2006). A corpus-based EAP course for NNS doctoral students: Moving from available specialized corpora to self-compiled corpora. English for Specific Purposes, 56-75. • Rubin, D., & Kang, O. (2008). Writing to speak: What goes on across the two-way street. In D. Belcher & A. Hirvela (Eds.), The oral-literate connection: Perspectives on L2 speaking, writing, and other media interactions (pp. 210-225). Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. • Swales, J., & Feak, C. (2003). English in today’s research world: A writing guide. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. • Swales, J., & Feak, C. (2004). Academic writing for graduate students, 2nd edition. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. • Weissberg, R., & S. Buker (1990). Writing up research: Experimental research report writing for students of English. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.