comparative child protection seeing ourselves as others see us l.
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Comparative child protection: Seeing ourselves as others see us

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 14

Comparative child protection: Seeing ourselves as others see us - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 135 Views
  • Uploaded on

Comparative child protection: Seeing ourselves as others see us. Patrick Ayre Department of Applied Social Studies University of Luton Park Square, Luton email: pga@patrickayre.co.uk web: http://patrickayre.co.uk. THE LAW: MESSAGES FROM THE CHILDREN ACT 1989.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Comparative child protection: Seeing ourselves as others see us' - tod


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
comparative child protection seeing ourselves as others see us

Comparative child protection:Seeing ourselves as others see us

Patrick Ayre

Department of Applied Social Studies

University of Luton

Park Square, Luton

email: pga@patrickayre.co.uk

web: http://patrickayre.co.uk

the law messages from the children act 1989
THE LAW: MESSAGES FROM THE CHILDREN ACT 1989
  • The welfare of the child is the paramount consideration.
  • Wherever possible, children should be brought up and cared for within their own families; local authorities cannot acquire parental responsibility without a court order.
  • Children should be safe and protected by intervention if they are in danger; such intervention must be open to challenge.
  • Children should be consulted and kept informed about what happens to them, and participate in the decisions made about them
  • Local authority has a duty under s47 to investigate where it seems a child is suffering or likely to suffer significant harm
the law messages from the children act 19898
THE LAW: MESSAGES FROM THE CHILDREN ACT 1989

Help for parents with children " in need" should be offered as a service to the child and the family, and should:

  • be provided in partnership with the parents
  • meet each child's identified needs
  • be appropriate in terms of the child's race, culture, religion and linguistic background
  • be open to effective, independent representations and complaints procedures
  • draw upon effective collaboration between agencies, including those in the voluntary sector
working together
WORKING TOGETHER

Child protection work in Britain characterised by

  • emphasis on inter-agency co-operation
  • fairly complex structural arrangements to facilitate it

Pattern influenced by :

  • public enquiries
  • centralised pattern of provision of key services
major features of the system
MAJOR FEATURES OF THE SYSTEM
  • Child protection belongs to everyone
  • Emphasis on collaboration :
    • Informal consultation and discussion
    • Investigation planning
    • Case conferences
    • Core group working
    • Local Safeguarding Children Board and its sub-groups
    • ease of working together is also fostered by joint training.
inter agency work and risk
Inter-agency Work and Risk

Problems arise from

  • Closed professional systems
  • Polarisation
  • Exaggeration of hierarchy
  • Role confusion
inter agency work and risk12
Inter-agency Work and Risk

Interagency system is unable to deal effectively with:

  •  agencies not fully integrated into centralised system
  •  dysfunctional inter-agency relationships
  •  shortage of resources
  •  individual ignorance and error
information handling problems
Information handling problems
  • Inadequate knowledge
  • Picking out the important from a mass of data
  • Interpretation
  • Distinguishing fact/opinion
  • Too trusting/insufficiently critical
  • Mistrusted source
information handling problems14
Information handling problems
  • Decoyed by another problem
  • False certainty; undue faith in a ‘known fact’
  • Competing tasks in one visit/worker
  • Scattered information
  • Discarding information which does not fit
  • First impressions/assumptions
ad