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First-year Composition @ UGA

First-year Composition @ UGA

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First-year Composition @ UGA

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  1. First-year Composition @ UGA

  2. First-year Composition @ UGA

  3. First-year Composition @ UGA

  4. First-year Composition @ UGA • Eng1101--- argumentative discourse • Eng1102--- academic arguments through literature • e-Portfolio through <emma>™

  5. First-year Composition @ UGA • English 1101:First-year Composition I & • English 1102: First-year Composition II • English 1102M: Multicultural First-year Composition II • Honors Courses for First-year Composition II • English 1050H (Composition and Literature) • English 1060H (Composition and Multicultural Literature)

  6. Placement • The Advanced Placement Test:Students who earn a score of 3 or 4 on the National Advanced Placement Test in Literature or Composition receive three hours of credit for English 1101; those who earn a score of 5 receive six hours of credit for English 1101 and 1102. All AP equivalencies are available on the Registrar’s website: http://www.reg.uga.edu/creditFromTesting/advancedPlacement/uga_ap_credit_equivalencies. • The International Baccalaureate (IB) Test:Students who earn a score of 4, 5, or 6 on the International Baccalaureate Test at the Higher Level (HL) in English receive three hours of credit for English 1101; those who earn a score of 7 on the International Baccalaureate Test at the Higher Level (HL) receive six hours of credit for English 1101 and 1102. Students who earn a score of 5, 6, or 7 on the Standard Level (SL) test receive three hours of credit for English 1101. All IB equivalencies are available on the Registrar’s website: http://www.reg.uga.edu/creditFromTesting/internationalBaccalaureate/uga_ib_credit_equivalencies.

  7. Placement • The Departmental Placement Test • Beginning in Fall 2003, students not placed by a national placement test will fall into two groups. • Students with an SATV score of 590 and above or an ACT score of 26 or above will place automatically in ENGL 1101 and may register for that class without any further testing; if these students choose to do so, they may take the Departmental Placement Test voluntarily with an eye to exempting NGL 1101 with three hours of credit. • Students with an SATV score of 580 or below are required to take the Departmental Placement Test before registering for a First-year Composition class. • The Departmental English Placement Test consists of two parts, mechanics and rhetoric. • A score of 22 (part 1) and 20 (part 2) will place students in English 1102 and give them three hours of credit for English 1101. • Students whose test scores indicate that they might have trouble in English 1101 will write an essay to determine whether they will be advised to take English 1101 or an Academic Enhancement class. • Students should take the test at a First-year Orientation Session. Those who miss the test at Orientation may take it later at University Testing Services in Clark Howell Hall. • However, the test is not open to students who have taken or are currently enrolled in First-year Composition here or elsewhere

  8. English 1101: First-year Composition I • informational, analytical, and argumentative writing (the principal genres of academic discourse that students will encounter in many courses across the curriculum) • research skills • critical thinking

  9. English 1101: First-year Composition I • Prerequisite: Students must either place into English 1101 or pass out of the Academic Enhancement Program

  10. English 1101: First-year Composition I • Goals: • write papers in and out of class using processes that include discovering ideas and evidence, organizing that material, and revising, editing, and polishing the finished paper; • think critically so that they can recognize the difference between opinion and evidence and so that they can support a complex, challenging thesis; • address papers to a range of audiences; • understand the collaborative and social aspects of the writing process and demonstrate an ability to critique the writing of themselves and others;

  11. English 1101: First-year Composition I • Goals: • develop a sense of voice appropriate to the subject, the writer’s purpose, the context, and the reader’s expectations; • understand how genres shape reading and writing and produce writing in several genres; • follow the conventions of standard edited English and MLA documentation; • use electronic environments for drafting, reviewing, revising, editing, and sharing texts; • understand and exploit the differences in the rhetorical strategies and in the affordances available for both print and electronic composing processes and texts.

  12. English 1101: First-year Composition Içç • Requirements: Students will write a minimum of three essays (1,000-1,500 words or longer) that count for at least 50% of the student’s final grade. In addition to writing papers and doing other work, all students will create a final electronic portfolio that counts approximately as one-third of their final grade.

  13. English 1101: First-year Composition Içç • Course Texts: • Lunsford, ed. The St. Martin’s Hand­book, 7th ed. • Rosenwasserand Stephen, Writing Analytically, 6th ed. • First-year Composition Guide, 2011 ed. (Fountainhead Press) • Any standard college dictionary, such as: • American Heritage Dictionary • Random House College Dictionary • Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary • Webster’s New World Dictionary

  14. English 1102: First-year Composition II • Prerequisite: • enroll: D or better in Eng1101 • graduate: • C or better in Eng1101 • combined average of C in Eng1101 & Eng1102(M)

  15. English 1102: First-year Composition II While English 1101 focuses on different varieties of non-fiction writing, English 1102 focuses on informational, analytical, and argumentative writing through literary texts in various genres

  16. English 1102: First-year Composition II • Goals: • read fiction, drama, and poetry and write analytically about them; • understand literary principles and use basic terms important to critical writing and reading; • write papers in and out of class using processes that include discovering ideas and evidence, organizing that material, and revising, editing, and polishing the finished paper; • think critically so that they can recognize the difference between opinion and evidence and so that they can support a complex, challenging thesis, and more specifically, document essays using textual evidence; • address papers to a range of audiences;

  17. English 1102: First-year Composition II • Goals: • understand the collaborative and social aspects of the writing process and demonstrate an ability to critique the writing of themselves and others; • develop a sense of voice appropriate to the subject, the writer’s purpose, the context, and the reader’s expectations; • understand how genres shape reading and writing and produce writing in several genres; • follow the conventions of standard edited English and MLA documentation; • use electronic environments for drafting, reviewing, revising, editing, and sharing texts; • understand and exploit the differences in the rhetorical strategies and in the affordances available for both print and electronic composing processes and texts.

  18. English 1102: First-year Composition II • Requirements: Students will write a minimum of three essays (1,000-1,500 words or longer) that count for at least 50% of the student’s final grade. In addition to writing papers and doing other work, all students will create a final electronic portfolio that counts approximately as one-third of their final grade.

  19. English 1102: First-year Composition II • Course Texts: • Lunsford, ed. The St. Martin’s Hand­book, 7th ed. • Clifford and Schilb, eds. Making Literature Matter, 4th ed., or Desmet, Hart, and Miller, eds., Prentice Hall Literature Portfolio, or another approved text of the instructor’s choice; • First-year Composition Guide, 2011 ed. (Fountainhead Press) • Any standard college dictionary, such as: • American Heritage Dictionary • Random House College Dictionary • Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary • Webster’s New World Dictionary

  20. English 1102M: Multicultural First-year Composition II • focuses on developing effective critical writing, reading, and research skills using core texts that explore the multicultural dimensions of American literature and culture, with an emphasis on African American, Latino/a American, Asian-American, and/or Native American literary traditions. • This course offers three hours of credit toward the First-year Composition requirement and satisfies the Franklin College Multicultural Literacy requirement.

  21. English 1102M: Multicultural First-year Composition II • Goals: • read fiction, drama, and poetry — with an emphasis on  African American, Latino/a American, Asian-American, and/or Native American literary traditions — and write analytically about them; • situate literature in the historical and cultural context of production and reception; • understand literary principles and use basic terms important to critical writing and reading; • write papers in and out of class using processes that include discovering ideas and evidence, organizing that material, and revising, editing, and polishing the finished paper; • think critically so that they can recognize the differ­ence between opinion and evidence and so that they can support a complex, challenging thesis, and more specifically, document essays using textual evidence; • address papers to a range of audiences;

  22. English 1102M: Multicultural First-year Composition II • Goals: • understand the collaborative and social aspects of the writing process and demonstrate an ability to critique the writing of themselves and others; • develop a sense of voice appropriate to the subject, the writer’s purpose, the context, and the reader’s expectations; • understand how genres shape reading and writing and produce writing in several genres; • follow the conventions of standard edited English and MLA documentation; • use electronic environments for drafting, reviewing, revising, editing, and sharing texts; • understand and exploit the differences in the rhetorical strategies and in the affordances available for both print and electronic composing processes and texts.

  23. English 1102M: Multicultural First-year Composition II • Requirements: Students will write a minimum of three essays (1,000-1,500 words or longer) that count for at least 50% of their final grade. In addition to writing papers and doing other work, all students will create a final electronic portfolio that counts approximately as one-third of their final grade. The ePortfolio is discussed at greater length below.

  24. English 1102M: Multicultural First-year Composition II • Course Texts: • Lunsford, ed. The St. Martin’s Hand­book, 7th ed. • Schmidt and Crockett, eds., Portable Legaciesor another approved text of the instructor’s choice • First-year Composition Guide, 2011 ed. (Fountainhead Press) • Any standard college dictionary, such as: • American Heritage Dictionary • Random House College Dictionary • Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary • Webster’s New World Dictionary

  25. English Composition for ESOL Students • Special sections of English 1101 and 1102/1102M are reserved for students who have a native language other than American English and who can benefit from an English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) emphasis in these classes. • Students enroll only with the permission of the department (POD), but the classes are not marked differently on their transcripts. • The ESOL sections, like classes for native speakers, focus on writing academic argument in English 1101 and writing about literature in English 1102/1102M. • In addition to offering three hours of credit toward the First-year Composition requirement, English 1102M ESOL will also fulfill the Franklin College Multicultural Literacy requirement. • First-year Composition classes for ESOL offer non-native speakers opportunities for vocabulary development, for grammar practice, and for orientation to American styles of writing and organization. • Residents of the United States whose first language is not American English, as well as international students, may qualify for these classes.

  26. First-year Composition Online • Often, the FYC Program offers several English 1101 and 1102/1102M sections taught via the Internet and the World Wide Web. • First-year Composition Online has the same goals and requirements as other FYC classes at the University of Georgia: our version of the course has an additional advantage in that it asks students to communicate through writing frequently and in different contexts. • FYC courses at the University of Georgia are synchronous – that is, students meet virtually in class at designated class times each week.

  27. Alternative Approaches to First-year Composition • Special Topics:Experienced instructors may design a special topics version of FYC that is approved in advance by the First-year Composition Committee. These courses often focus on topics related to the instructor’s research or scholarly interests, and the sections are marked by a special note in OASIS (Online Access to Student Information Systems). • UGA Learning Communities:The FYC Program has played a major role in the development of UGA’s Learning Communities. As part of each Learning Community, students take a First-year Composition class that is linked to the theme of the LC and sometimes to the content of their other courses in the LC. • FYC in the Franklin Residential College:Each Fall semester the FYC Program offers one section of First-year Composition for the Franklin Residential Community. This special class is designed specifically for the community by the instructor. • Reacting to the Past:The FYC Program frequently offers sections of composition that incorporate the innovative pedagogy of UGA’s Reacting to the Past curriculum

  28. General Grading Weights C Competent / Credible / Complete     (70-79) B Skillful / Persuasive (80-89) A Distinctive (90-100) D Ineffective (60-69) F Extremely Ineffective (<60) WF     Withdrew, failing WP Withdrew, passing

  29. First-year Composition @ UGA

  30. Evaluation rubrics • Essay evaluation rubric: • Short form • Long form (contains explanatory notes) • Portfolio rubrics • Portfolio Grading Rubric (RTF)

  31. Sample Syllabi

  32. Portfolios