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Mande: Dancing and Drumming

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Presentation Transcript

  1. Mande: Dancing and Drumming T The West African Experience

  2. What is Mande? • “Mande” is a heading of one of the major branches of the large Niger-Congo language groupings that covers most of West Africa (Charry 2000:15) - Liberia - Ghana - Sierra Leone - Senegal - Mali

  3. History of Mande • In the 13th century, the West African Mande (or Mali) empire was established by the legendary warrior and hero Sunjata and his allies • The Mande homeland is situated along the Upper Niger River roughly between Bamako in southwestern Mali and Kouroussa in northeastern Guinea

  4. Mali • Music is very important - Back in the time of the Mali Empire, griots performed songs for kings and nobles. - Mali has produced many stars of African music, including a number of female singers of Mande music - OumouSangare

  5. Interview • Michelle Coulibaly -began as a ballet dancer but then later got introduced to African dancing by a lady from Sierra Leone - wanted to have a deeper understanding of how African dance worked -went to Senegal to study dance however, in Mali is where the dancing really affected her

  6. Drumming • In Mali, as well as in the Mande class the djembe is played. -meaning of the drum translates into “everyone gather together in peace” - lead djembe player controls the ensemble and engages in two fundamental kinds of playing -singing or group dancing - solo dancing

  7. Dancing • In Mali, performers sing to the drummers before dancing to symbolize respect • In public events, a circle is formed with the drummers at the head - dancers emerge singly or in twos and threes approaching the drummers, engaging with them for short periods of time and then falling back into the circle - those in the circle support the dancers by clapping and cheering