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Linda WAUGH & Béatrice DUPUY Co-Directors, CERCLL. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY-BASED PEDAGOGIES FOR THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM. Center for Educational Resources in Culture, Language and Literacy (CERCLL) The University of Arizona Tucson. TECHNOLOGY AND LANGUAGE TEACHING.

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innovative technology based pedagogies for the foreign language classroom

Linda WAUGH & Béatrice DUPUY

Co-Directors, CERCLL

INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY-BASED PEDAGOGIES FOR THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

Center for Educational Resources in Culture, Language and Literacy (CERCLL)

The University of Arizona

Tucson

technology and language teaching
TECHNOLOGY AND LANGUAGE TEACHING
  • Technology has supported language teaching throughout the years.
  • Prompted by paradigm shifts in approaches to language teaching (structural, cognitive, sociocognitive, sociocultural), technology use in language learning has been moving away from drill and practice to more communication-based contexts where task-based, project-based and content-based approaches are integrated with technologies.
typology
TYPOLOGY
  • In this presentation, we will highlight a number of technology tools and their uses in CERCLL projects:
    • Stand alone applications designed with primarily a language teaching purpose in mind: MaxAuthor, Hypermedia Text Annotations, OLÉ.
    • Stand alone applications not designed with a language purpose in mind, but used for that purpose: Teaching Portuguese to Spanish Speakers, Game to Learn: Fluency in Play, Global Simulation.
slide4

MAXAUTHOR: TRAINING AND SUPPORTIN COLLABORATION WITH THE CRITICAL LANGUAGES PROGRAM AND THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL LANGUAGE PROGRAMS

Scott Brill

Chief engineer, CLP

University of Arizona

Project Director

Critical Languages Program

maxauthor training and support http cali arizona edu docs wmaxa
MAXAUTHOR: TRAINING AND SUPPORT(HTTP://CALI.ARIZONA.EDU/DOCS/WMAXA/ )
  • A multimedia call authoring system which started to be developed in 1995 with NSEP and IRS grant.
  • Lets you create language instruction courseware for Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and 44 other languages. Completed courseware can utilize audio, video, footnotes, and graphics.
  • Lessons can be delivered via Internet or MS-Windows.
  • Free download for non-commercial use (several thousand downloads to date)
maxauthor training and support
MAXAUTHOR: TRAINING AND SUPPORT
  • Rationale/purpose: This project produced a training video for use with the MaxAuthor language learning software and provides technical support for those using MaxAuthor.
  • Manual: Available on the Critical Language website, the online manuals provide tutorials for anyone that wants to use MaxAuthor, or MaxAuthor components to develop their own electronic language lessons.
  • FAQ: http://cali.arizona.edu/docs/wmaxa/faq/
maxauthor training and support outcomes
MAXAUTHOR: TRAINING AND SUPPORTOUTCOMES
  • Downloaded by thousands of instructors worldwide.
  • Used by the US and Canadian Foreign Service Institutes and several Native American nations.
  • Working with Dr. Ofelia Zepeda (UA) on a companion MaxAuthor-based DVD-ROM for her book, A Tohono O'odham Grammar.
maxauthor training and support outcomes8
MAXAUTHOR: TRAINING AND SUPPORT: OUTCOMES
  • "I have really enjoyed working with MaxAuthor. Besides being very easy to use, this software allows authors to create materials taking into account goals of specific language courses and learners' needs. In addition, students do not just read the language texts but also listen to them, and even see native speakers using them.” Dr. Rosangela Silva, American University of Beirut.
  • "MaxAuthor is an excellent tool for developing language materials that can be specifically tailored for a target audience…[providing] language educators with an intuititive, non-intimidating way of developing a family of useful language-learning activities from a single text… As research in Second Language Acquisition tells us, language learners, particularly adult learners, are best served by a variety of language-learning contexts. Exposure to native-speaker output is critical, and here, MaxAuthor 's audio and video capabilities are outstanding. Dr. David J. Silva, Associate Professor of Linguistics, University of Texas at Arlington
hypermedia multimodal text annotations
HYPERMEDIA: MULTIMODAL TEXT ANNOTATIONS

Dr. Robert Ariew

University of Arizona

Project Director

Theresa Catalano

Ph.D. Candidate, Second Language Acquisition and Teaching (SLAT)

University of Arizona

hypermedia multimodal text annotations10
HYPERMEDIA: MULTIMODAL TEXT ANNOTATIONS
  • Rationale/purpose:
    • Research shows that hypermedia glosses
      • Make significant contributions to vocabulary learning and reading comprehension (e.g.: Coll, 2002; Lomicka, 1998)
      • Can make different contributions (e.g.: Akbulut, 2008; Ariew & Ercetin, 2004; Sakar & Ercetin, 2004) based on their nature. Visual (video and picture) and text annotations appear to be the most useful (e.g.: Al-Seghayer, 2001; Akbulut, 2008).
    • In this project different types of texts are annotated with multimedia hyperlinks (hypermedia) to facilitate linguistic as well as cultural comprehension of texts by language learners.
hypermedia multimodal text annotations11
HYPERMEDIA: MULTIMODAL TEXT ANNOTATIONS
  • The first version of this is developed as a model/prototype, the approach and software is usable for any language.
  • Piloting of the materials will take place in Fall 2009.
hypermedia multimodal text annotations13
HYPERMEDIA: MULTIMODAL TEXT ANNOTATIONS

Words in blue are glossed. Click to see the multimedia.

Green buttons provide extra information.

hypermedia multimodal text annotations14
HYPERMEDIA: MULTIMODAL TEXT ANNOTATIONS

The user has clicked on Roma. An image and/or a definition appear.

hypermedia multimodal text annotations15
HYPERMEDIA: MULTIMODAL TEXT ANNOTATIONS

User has clicked on an information button. Additional information appears.

hypermedia multimodal text annotations references
HYPERMEDIA: MULTIMODAL TEXT ANNOTATIONS - REFERENCES
  • Akbulut, Y. (2008). Predictors of foreign language reading comprehension in a hypermedia reading environment. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 39 (1), 37-50.
  • Al-Seghayer, K. (2001). The effect of multimedia annotation modes on L2 vocabulary acquisition. Language Learning & Technology, 5 (1), 202-232.
  • Ariew, R. & Ercetin, G. (2004) Exploring the potential of hypermedia annotations for second language reading. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 17 (2), 237-259.
  • Coll, J. F. (2002). Richness of semantic encoding in a hypermedia-assisted instructional environment for ESP: effects on incidental vocabulary retention among learners with low ability in the target language. Recall,14 (2) 263-284.
  • Lomicka, L. (1998). “To gloss or not to gloss”: An investigation of reading comprehension online. Language Learning & Technology, 1 (2), 41-50.
  • Sakar, A. & Ercetin, G. (2004). Effectiveness of hypermedia annotations for foreign language reading. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 21, 28-38.
ol online learning environment in collaboration with the learning technology center
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)IN COLLABORATION WITH THE LEARNING TECHNOLOGY CENTER

Garry Forger

University of Arizona

Project Director -Technology Manager CERCLL

Development and Grant Management Office for Learning Technologies

OLÉ Board

(http://ole.arizona.edu)

ol online learning environment
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)

Posting a topic

Responding to a topic

ol online learning environment20
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)

Permission types

Setting permissions

ol online learning environment anticipatory activities
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)ANTICIPATORY ACTIVITIES
  • Lesson Previews
  • Brainstorming
  • Predicting
ol online learning environment monologue activities
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)MONOLOGUE ACTIVITIES
  • Self-introductions
  • Show & Tell
  • Storytelling
  • Research Reports
  • Media Reviews
ol online learning environment pair activities
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)PAIR ACTIVITIES
  • Scripted Exchanges
  • Conversations
  • Interviews
  • Role Plays
  • Debates
ol online learning environment group discussions
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)GROUP DISCUSSIONS
  • Comparative investigations
  • Decision Making Tasks
  • Group projects
  • Collaborative writing
  • Conferencing
ol online learning environment extension activities
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)EXTENSION ACTIVITIES
  • Personal Connections
  • International Key-Pals
ol online learning environment review activities
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)REVIEW ACTIVITIES
  • Useful expressions
  • Class Glossaries
  • Mini Lessons
  • Lesson Summaries
ol online learning environment implementation
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)IMPLEMENTATION
  • Technology training
    • A workshop on Technology and Language Instruction will be offered on June 5that the University of Arizona. Uses of OLÉ will be showcased and discussed.
  • Regular assignments
  • Systematic feedback
  • Evaluation - Scoring
ol online learning environment current uses
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)CURRENT USES
  • UA: Spring 2009 semester
    • Used by 556 students in first and second year French, Spanish, and Japanese classes
    • CESL (Center for English as a Second Language, University of Arizona) on campus and in Nogales (Sonora, Mexico).
  • Pilots: U of Miami, Ohio (Japanese) and Kyushu University Fukuoka, Japan (ESL).
ol online learning environment outcomes
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)OUTCOMES
  • University of Arizona, in cooperation with the American Association of teachers of Arabic, launched a nationwide Arabic poetry recitation competition using OLÉ.
  • “Using the OLE system [has] allowed me to assign my students a variety of oral proficiency development tasks to be performed outside of class and to have a concrete "performance" that I can evaluate. The fact that students know that their oral performances will be preserved and listened to for evaluation, motivates them to practice those performances multiple times before submitting them for evaluation.” Dr. Martha Schulte-Nafeh, University of Texas at Austin, formerly Middle Eastern Language Coordinator for Dept. of NES at University of Arizona
ol online learning environment outcomes30
OLÉ (ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT)OUTCOMES
  • Dr. Paul A. Lyddon, Miami University (U.S.A.) & Dr. Robert Diem, Kyushu University (Japan)
    • Implemented OLÉ System to mediate a bilingual exchange between American learners of Japanese at Miami University, Ohio and Japanese learners of English at Kyushu University.
    • “The preliminary results of an end-of-course survey we conducted indicate that the OLÉ System discussions were among the most popular activities in both courses. In particular, students indicated that they particularly enjoyed the cultural aspect.”
    • “I highly recommend this type of web-based collaboration to other language teachers who might be willing to give it a try”-Dr. Paul Lyddon, Miami University, School of Education, Health & Society, Dept. of Teacher Education
slide31

TEACHING PORTUGUESE TO SPANISH SPEAKERS: L1, L2, AND HERITAGE: A STRUCTURED ENHANCED INPUT APPROACH IN COLLABORATION WITH THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES AND DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE

Dr. Ana Carvalho

University of Arizona

Project Director

Antonio J. B. da Silva, Ph.D. Candidate, Linguistic Anthropology; Juliana L. Freire, Ph.D. Candidate, Spanish and Portuguese

University of Arizona

teaching portuguese to spanish speakers l1 l2 and heritage a structured enhanced input approach
TEACHING PORTUGUESE TO SPANISH SPEAKERS: L1, L2, AND HERITAGE: A STRUCTURED ENHANCED INPUT APPROACH
  • Rationale/purpose: Inspired by the work of Van Patten, this project is based on the need to create materials that focus on form and develop awareness of the differences between Spanish and Portuguese (Ferreira, 1995; Grannier, 2000; Carvalho, 2002). It aims at capitalizing on Spanish speakers’ premature abilities to read Portuguese texts and providing them with authentic readings which are structured in a way as to draw their attention to some formal differences between Spanish and Portuguese.
teaching portuguese to spanish speakers l1 l2 and heritage a structured enhanced input approach33
TEACHING PORTUGUESE TO SPANISH SPEAKERS: L1, L2, AND HERITAGE: A STRUCTURED ENHANCED INPUT APPROACH
  • Manual and web materials are developed and will be available to anyone on an open website.
  • Workshop on how to best use these materials will be offered on June 3rd, 2009 at the University of Arizona.
teaching portuguese to spanish speakers l1 l2 and heritage a structured enhanced input approach34
TEACHING PORTUGUESE TO SPANISH SPEAKERS: L1, L2, AND HERITAGE: A STRUCTURED ENHANCED INPUT APPROACH

Antes de ler o texto:

1. Conecte as palavras da primeira coluna de acordo com o significado equivalente na segunda coluna:

a. gosto ( ) experimentar

b. Fofinho ( ) distante

c. poluir ( ) incerteza

d. gostosinhas ( ) bonitinho

e. longe ( ) contaminar

f. tropeçar ( ) desfrute

h. aproveite ( ) cair

i. provar ( ) saborosinhas

j. dúvida ( ) sabor

teaching portuguese to spanish speakers l1 l2 and heritage references
TEACHING PORTUGUESE TO SPANISH SPEAKERS: L1, L2, AND HERITAGE - REFERENCES
  • Carvalho, A. (2000) Portugues para falantes de espanhol: Perspectivas de um campo de pesquisa (Portuguese for Spanish speakers: Perspectives of a research field). Hispania, 85(3), 597-608.
  • Ferreira, I. A. (1995) “A Interlíngua do falante de espanhol e o papel do professor: Aceitação tácita ou ajuda para superá-la?” Português para Estrangeiros. Interface com o espanhol. Ed. José Carlos Paes de Almeida Filho. Campinas: Pontes, pp. 39-48.
  • Grannier, D. M (2000) “Uma proposta heterodoxa para o ensino de português a falantes deespanhol.” Português para estrangeiros: Perspectivas de quem ensina. Ed. Norimar Júdice. Niterói: Intertexto, pp. 57-80.
slide36

GAME TO LEARN: LANGUAGE AND CULTURE ACQUISITION THROUGH COMPUTER GAME DESIGN/DISPLAY IN COLLABORATION WITH THE CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES AND THE LEARNING GAMES INITIATIVE

Ken McAllister

University of Arizona &

Judd Ruggill

Arizona State University

Project Directors

Seemin Raina

Ph.D. candidate

Language, Reading & Culture

University of Arizona

game to learn fluency in play
GAME TO LEARN: FLUENCY IN PLAY
  • Rationale/purpose:
    • Games, generally seen as a framework for providing a meaningful context for language acquisition.
    • In games (Underwood, 1987) “the user does not think about the language in use, but about the action and where it might lead next” (p. 217). As such, games could be seen as a lever for moving from drill-based to context-based acquisition.
    • Gee (2005) claims that “Since fruitful thinking involves building simulations in our heads that prepare us for action, thinking is itself somewhat like a video game, given that video games are external simulations” (p. 220).
    • Games as a context for apprenticeship in the use of language.
game to learn fluency in play38
GAME TO LEARN: FLUENCY IN PLAY
  • Rationale/purpose:
    • This project aims at providing K-16 teachers with an introduction to designing and building computer games for the foreign language classroom.
game to learn fluency in play references
GAME TO LEARN: FLUENCY IN PLAYREFERENCES
  • Gee, J. P. (2005) “Pleasure, Learning, Video Games, and Life: The projective stance” E-Learning, 2, (3), 211-223.
  • Gee, J. (2007). What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. 2nd ed. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • McAllister, K. (2004). Game Work: Language, Power, and Computer Game Culture. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press.
  • Prensky, M. (2005). “Computer games and learning: Digital game-based learning.” in Raessens, J. & Goldstein, J., eds., Handbook of Computer Game Studies, 97-122. MIT Press.
  • Underwood, John H. (1987) “Artificial Intelligence and CALL” in Modern Media in Foreign Language Education: Theory and Implementation. National Textbook Company.
slide42

EDUCATING GLOBAL CITIZENS THROUGH GLOBAL SIMULATION IN COLLABORATION WITH THE CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES AND DEPARTMENT OF RUSSIAN AND SLAVIC STUDIES

Dr. Béatrice Dupuy

University of Arizona

Project Director

Co-Director CERCLL

Ahmet Okal & Elena Shiskin Ph.D. Candidates in Second Language Acquisition and Teaching (SLAT)

University of Arizona

educating global citizens through global simulation
EDUCATING GLOBAL CITIZENS THROUGH GLOBAL SIMULATION
  • Purpose
    • Re-centers instruction on the learner
    • Promotes more active learning
    • Develops free-expression and creativity
    • Fosters true communicative competence in culturally meaningful and relevant contexts
  • Definition Simulation is…
    • “An event in which participants have (functional) roles, duties, and sufficient information about the problem to carry out these duties without play acting or inventing key facts” (Jones, 1995, p.18).
    • Not reality, students must behave and act within the simulation as if it were, and as they do, it takes on a reality of its own. “Then the experiences of the participants become real, and the use of language becomes meaningful communication. Simulations thus encourage language participants to use their new language in the ways most people do in other (similar but real) situations” (Crookall & Oxford, 1990, p. 15).
educating global citizens through global simulation44
EDUCATING GLOBAL CITIZENS THROUGH GLOBAL SIMULATION
  • Characteristics
    • Long term
    • Global, what’s in a word?
      • Entire range of authentic oral and written exchanges possible in and around the chosen premise is explored.
        • Exchanges naturally grow out of the needs that arise from the GS and are essential to its successful completion.
      • Full gamut of curricular areas (e.g., geography, history, art, music, literature, mathematics, etc.) other than foreign languages are tapped into if they are needed to complete the final project.
      • Language skills but also practical skills (e.g., posting on a blog, writing collaboratively using a wiki, etc.) and cognitive skills (goal setting, project planning, product archiving, self-assessment, leadership, etc.) can be promoted, and affective behaviors such as self-confidence and risk-taking can be fostered.
educating global citizens through global simulation45
EDUCATING GLOBAL CITIZENS THROUGH GLOBAL SIMULATION
  • Characteristics
    • Phases and stages with in-between a briefing and debriefing sessions.
    • Teachers and learners as one with learners being at the center.
    • For additional details, see (Dupuy, 2006a/b; Levine, 2004a/b, Mills & Péron, in press).
education global citizens through global simulation
EDUCATION GLOBAL CITIZENS THROUGH GLOBAL SIMULATION
  • GS and technology tools
    • Not needed to complete GS, but can assist in…
      • giving access to resources and models for completing it.
      • promoting collaboration among peers inside and outside of the classroom.
      • in creating an atmosphere that closely reflects real life contexts.
  • Sample tools used
      • Google Docs
      • Google Sketchup
      • Website/LMS
      • YouTube, Skype, Jing
      • Facebook, LiveJournal, Flickr
education global citizens through global simulation47
EDUCATION GLOBAL CITIZENS THROUGH GLOBAL SIMULATION
  • Create documents and presentation online
  • Share and collaborate in real time
  • Review and edit as needed
  • Safely store for later access
  • Control who has access
educating global citizens through global simulation references
EDUCATING GLOBAL CITIZENS THROUGH GLOBAL SIMULATION: REFERENCES
  • Crookall, D. & Oxford, R. (1990) Linking language learning and simulation/gaming, In D. Crookall & R. Oxford (Eds.), Simulation, gaming, and language learning (pp. 3- 23), New York: Harper House.
  • Dupuy, B. (2006a). "L'Immeuble": French language and culture teaching and learning through projects in a global simulation. In J. Hammadou-Sullivan (ed.), Project-based Learning in Second Language Education: Past, Present and Future, Research in Second Language Learning (vol.5). (pp. 195-214) Greenwich (CT): Information Age Publishing, Inc.
  • Dupuy, B. (2006b). Global simulation: Experiential pedagogy and preparing students for study abroad at home. In S. Wilkinson (ed.), Insight from Study Abroad for Language Programs (vol.6), (pp. 134-156). Boston (MA): AAUSC
  • Jones, K. (1995) Simulations: A handbook for teachers (Rev. ed.). London: Kogan Page.
  • Levine, G. (2004a). Global simulation: A student-centered. Task-based format for intermediate foreign language courses. Foreign Language Annals, 37 (1), 26-36.
  • Levine, G. (2004b). Global simulation at the intersection of theory and practice in the intermediate-level German classroom. Die Unterrichtspraxis,27(2), 99-116.
  • Mills, N. & Péron, M. (in press). Global simulation and writing self-beliefs of college intermediate French students. International Journal of Applied Linguistics.
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