splash screen n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Splash Screen PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Splash Screen

play fullscreen
1 / 108

Splash Screen

112 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Splash Screen

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Splash Screen

  2. Chapter Preview Section 1: Minority, Race, and Ethnicity Section 2: Racial and Ethnic Relations Section 3: Theories of Prejudice and Discrimination Section 4: Minority Groups in the United States Chapter Menu

  3. Chapter Preview · Section 1 Minority, Race, and Ethnicity (pages 276–279) Sociologists have specific definitions for minority, race, and ethnicity. Ethnic minorities have often been subjected to prejudice and discrimination. Chapter Preview 1

  4. Chapter Preview · Section 2 Racial and Ethnic Relations (pages 280–283) Patterns of racial and ethnic relations take two forms: assimilation and conflict. Patterns of assimilation include Anglo-conformity, melting pot, and cultural pluralism. Conflict patterns include genocide, population transfer, and subjugation. Chapter Preview 2

  5. Chapter Preview · Section 3 Theories of Prejudice and Discrimination(pages 284–289) Prejudice refers to attitudes, while discrimination is about behavior. Prejudice often leads to discrimination, but in some instances discrimination creates prejudiced attitudes due to stereotyping. Each of the three major perspectives looks at different aspects of prejudice. Chapter Preview 3

  6. Chapter Preview · Section 4 Minority Groups in the United States(pages 290–301) Discrimination has caused some ethnic and racial groups to lag behind the white majority in jobs, income, and education. Progress is being made, but the gains made by all minorities remain fragile. African American, Latino, Asian American, Native American, and white ethnics are the largest minorities in this country. Chapter Preview 4

  7. Chapter Preview-End

  8. Sociologists have specific definitions particular to their field of study for minority, race, and ethnicity. Ethnic minorities have historically been subjected to prejudice and discrimination. Section 1-Preview

  9. minority race ethnic minority Section 1-Key Terms

  10. A B C D Do you feel that prejudice and discrimination still exist today? A.Very much B.Somewhat C. Not very much D.Not at all Section 1-Polling Question

  11. Minorities • A minority population is defined by something more than size or number. • A minority has several key features: • A minority has distinctive physical or cultural characteristics that can be used to separate it from the majority. Section 1

  12. Minorities (cont.) • The minority is dominated by the majority. • Minority traits are often believed by the dominant majority to be inferior. • Members of the minority have a common sense of identity, with strong group loyalty. • The majority determines who belongs to the minority through ascribed status. Section 1

  13. A B C D Which of the following characteristics sets the minority group apart from the majority group? A.Religion B.Skin color C. Language D.All of the above Section 1

  14. Defining Race • Members of a race share certain biologically-inherited physical characteristics that are considered equally important within a society. • Sociologists focus more on the social attitudes and characteristics that relate to race more than physical differences. Section 1

  15. Defining Race (cont.) • There is no scientific evidence that connects any racial characteristic with innate superiority or inferiority. Section 1

  16. A B C D Does the term “pure” race exist? A. Always B.Sometimes C. Never D.Not sure Section 1

  17. Ethnicity • An ethnic minority is socially identified by unique characteristics related to culture or nationality. • This type of minority is a subculture defined by its own language, religion, values, beliefs, norms, and customs. Section 1

  18. Ethnicity (cont.) • Negative attitudes toward ethnic minorities exist in part because of ethnocentrism (judging others in terms of one’s own cultural standards). • The majority may view a minority as inferior because they differ in beliefs, values, and norms. Attitudes of Americans Toward Immigrant Minorities Section 1

  19. A B C D Do you believe that there are ways to bridge the gaps between an ethnic minority and a majority group? A.Yes B.No C. Not sure D.Sometimes Section 1

  20. Section 1-End

  21. Patterns of racial and ethnic relations take two forms: assimilation and conflict. Patterns of assimilation include Anglo-conformity, melting pot, cultural pluralism, and accommodation. Conflict patterns include genocide, population transfer, and subjugation. Section 2-Preview

  22. assimilation cultural pluralism genocide subjugation de jure segregation de facto segregation Section 2-Key Terms

  23. A B C D Are there positive and negative effects of different races and ethnicities living together? A.Yes B.No C. Sometimes D.Not at all Section-Polling Question

  24. Patterns of Assimilation • Assimilation refers to the blending or fusing of minority groups into the dominant society. Section 2

  25. Patterns of Assimilation (cont.) • Different forms of assimilation: • Anglo-conformity—immigrants are accepted as long as they conform; the most common pattern of assimilation in America. • Melting pot/tossed salad—all ethnic and racial minorities voluntarily blend together. Section 2

  26. Patterns of Assimilation (cont.) • Cultural pluralism—immigrants maintain some of their “old” ways, which can result in introducing some of their culture to the United States. • Accommodation—a minority maintains its own culturally-unique way of life. Section 2

  27. A B C D Which method of assimilation do you think is best and why do you think this? A.Anglo-conformity B.Melting pot C. Cultural pluralism D.Accommodation Section 2

  28. Patterns of Conflict • Different forms of conflict: • Genocide—the systematic effort to destroy an entire population. • Population transfer—a minority is forced either to move to a remote location or to leave entirely the territory controlled by the majority. Impact of the Holocaust Section 2

  29. Patterns of Conflict(cont.) • Subjugation—the minority is denied equal access to the culture and lifestyle of the larger society; the most common pattern of conflict. • De jure segregation—subjugation based on the law. Section 2

  30. Patterns of Conflict(cont.) • De facto segregation—a situation of segregation that exists regardless of what the law is. Section 2

  31. A B C D Which of the following is the most common form of conflict? A.Genocide B.Subjugation C. de jure segregation D.de facto segregation Section 2

  32. Section 2-End

  33. Prejudice involves attitudes, while discrimination is about behavior. Prejudice often leads to discrimination. Conversely, in some instances, discrimination creates prejudiced attitudes through stereotyping. Each of the three major perspectives looks at different aspects of prejudice. Section 3-Preview

  34. prejudice racism discrimination hate crime stereotype self-fulfilling prophecy Section 3-Key Terms

  35. A B C Has there ever been a time when you’ve felt discriminated against because of someone else’s prejudices? A.Yes B.No C. It depends on the situation Section 3-Polling Question

  36. Prejudice, Racism, and Discrimination • To a sociologist, prejudice refers to the widely-held preconceptions of a group (minority or majority) and its individual members. • Prejudice involves a generalization based on biased or insufficient information. Section 3

  37. Prejudice, Racism, and Discrimination(cont.) • Racism is an extreme form of prejudice. Racists believe that discrimination or exclusion is morally justified because of their own natural superiority. • Discrimination involves acting upon those biased opinions by treating people unfairly. Section 3

  38. A B C Does prejudice always results in discrimination? A.Yes B.No C. Sometimes Section 3

  39. Hate Crimes • A hate crime is a criminal act that is motivated by extreme prejudice. • Each of the perspectives—functionalist, conflict, and symbolic interactionism—can help us understand reasons for hate crimes. Hate Groups in America Section 3

  40. A B C D Do you agree with the following statement: “Hate crimes occur in relatively small numbers, but the frequency is increasing.” A.Very much B.Somewhat C. Not very much D.Not at all Section 3

  41. Stereotypes • A stereotype is a set of ideas—based on distortion, exaggeration, and oversimplification—that is applied to all members of a group. Section 3

  42. A B C D Have you ever been guilty of stereotyping a person and later found out that you were wrong? A.Always B.Sometimes C. Never D.Not sure Section 3

  43. The Functionalist Perspective • Negative aspects of prejudice and racism: • The social, political, educational, and economic costs to society are extremely high. • The safety and stability of the larger society are at risk due to violence. Section 3

  44. The Functionalist Perspective (cont.) • Positive aspect of prejudice and racism: • The self-concepts within the majority group are strengthened due to a feeling of superiority. Section 3

  45. A B C D Do you agree with the functionalist view of the “positive aspect” of discrimination? A.Agree B.Disagree C. Sometimes D.Not sure Section 3

  46. The Conflict Perspective • According to the conflict theory, a majority uses prejudice and discrimination as weapons of power to control a minority. • They do this in order to increase control over property, goods, and other resources. • Minorities tend to view one another as competitors instead of allies in the struggle against the majority. Section 3

  47. A B C D Do you think the example in the book, demonstrates the conflict perspective? A.Very much B.Somewhat C. Not very much D.Not at all Section 3

  48. The Symbolic Interactionist Perspective • According to this perspective, members of a society learn to be prejudiced in much the same way that they learn to be patriotic. • Two stages in learning to be prejudiced: • Pregeneralized learning period—children overhear parents making racist statements, but they have not yet learned to separate people by race or ethnic group. • Total rejection stage—children can use physical clues to sort people into groups. Section 3

  49. The Symbolic Interactionist Perspective (cont.) • Language itself can also reflect prejudices. • Self-fulfilling prophecy—an expectation that leads to behavior that then causes the expectation to become reality—also plays a large role in this perspective. • Members of a minority fail because of the low expectations they have for their own success. Prejudice and Discrimination Section 3

  50. A B C D Do you agree that language reflects prejudices? A.Agree B.Disagree C. Not sure D.Sometimes Section 3