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SETI on the SKA. US SKA Consortium Meeting Feb 28, 2000. Jill Tarter Bernard M. Oliver Chair SETI Institute. Where To Look At What Frequency When To Look For What Signal From How Far. For SETI, We Don’t Know. Where To Look At What Frequency When To Look For What Signal From How Far.

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seti on the ska

SETI on the SKA

US SKA Consortium Meeting

Feb 28, 2000

Jill Tarter

Bernard M. Oliver Chair

SETI Institute

for seti we don t know
Where To Look

At What Frequency

When To Look

For What Signal

From How Far

For SETI, We Don’t Know...
for seti we don t know3
Where To Look

At What Frequency

When To Look

For What Signal

From How Far

Stars!

For SETI, We Don’t Know...
for seti we don t know4
Where To Look

At What Frequency

When To Look

For What Signal

From How Far

As Much Of The Spectrum As Possible

(Terrestrial Wave

Window, Optical, IR)

For SETI, We Don’t Know...
for seti we don t know5
Where To Look

At What Frequency

When To Look

For What Signal

From How Far

Multiple Looks

(Scintillation, and

Time Varying Signals)

For SETI, We Don’t Know...
for seti we don t know6
Where To Look

At What Frequency

When To Look

For What Signal

From How Far

Technology Nature

(Compressed In

Frequency Or Time)

For SETI, We Don’t Know...
for seti we don t know7
Where To Look

At What Frequency

When To Look

For What Signal

From How Far

All The Sensitivity We Can Get!!!

For SETI, We Don’t Know...
seti on telescopes today
SETI On Telescopes Today
  • Targeted Searches Project Phoenix 10 micron IR Harvard Optical Berkeley Optical Columbus OSETI
serendip iv at arecibo
UC Berkeley SSL

Piggyback (commensal)

Almost 4 years of data

1420 MHz +/- 50 MHz

0.6 Hz resolution

12 seconds per beam

Simple threshold @ 15 

2.5 MHz time series data to [email protected]

SERENDIP IV At Arecibo

David Anderson

Dan Werthimer

project phoenix at arecibo
Project Phoenix At Arecibo
  • Microwave search from 1.2 to 3 GHz
real time signal detection
Frequency

Time

Real Time Signal Detection

M

Fully sample

frequency-

time plane

Drifting CW

detection

algorithm

MN2 

MN logN

N

real time signal detection12
Frequency

Time

Real Time Signal Detection

Thresholded

Sparse

Data Set

Triplet

Pulse

Detection

Algorithm

unique to project phoenix
6700 kmUnique to Project Phoenix

2 Antennas

linked as a

pseudo-

interferometer

unique to project phoenix14
Unique to Project Phoenix
  • Original selection of candidate signal is based on power detection with spectral resolution of 1Hz
  • Coherent integration onfollow up with spectral resolution that may be as fine as 0.01 Hz
  • Differential Doppler signature is key to RFI excision
current status of project phoenix
Current Status of Project Phoenix
  • Arecibo and Jodrell Bank
  • 12 am +/- 6 hr, 40 d/yr
  • 500 stars down, 500 to go
  • BW = 20 MHz  100 MHz(RCP and LCP)
  • Sensitivity limits 1012 W EIRP @ 155 lt yr 8x10-27 W/m2  1 Jy
how most comprehensive
How, Most Comprehensive??
  • Hard to compare targeted searches with sky surveys
  • If you assume stars are what matters (not interstellar spacecraft between the stars)
  • Can use sensitivity of the various searches to calculate the number of stars that are “accessible” within any given beam on the sky for both TS & SS
  • Comparison can then be made for any ETI power
  • Figure = # of Stars x BW x log(Fhi/Flo) x (1+ log q)
  • of Meritwhere q = number of looks
slide18
SERENDIP IV

searches for

intrinsically

strong sources

in sky visible

from Arecibo

Phoenix

seaches for

faint sources

nearby and

intrisically

strong sources

in the background

coverage of the cosmic haystack19
Coverage of the Cosmic Haystack

Results:

NothingTo Date

We Need

a Better

Telescope!

The First Step

slide21
Notes Added After Meeting:

The next slide is VERY IMPORTANT!

It shows that no matter where on the sky YOU ARE LOOKING

there will be multiple SETI target stars in the large field of view of

a small dish. Therefore for the cost of the beam-forming and

backend SETI processing systems, SETI can observe all the time

without interfering with scheduled observations of traditional

radio astronomy sources. (There would have to be some small

accommodation so that the field of view is not changed while an

interesting candidate signal is being pursued, but that will be

an infrequent conflict.)

1ht speeds up seti
1hT Speeds Up SETI

Multiplexing

For a target list of

1 million stars

(from GAIA mission)

there will be more than 1 star in the field of view of a 5m (or smaller) dish up to 10 GHz

and

Increased BW

ts seti observations with 1ht
TS SETI Observations with 1hT
  • 100 m equivalent
  • Number of beams = 3
  • Bin width = 0.01 Hz
  • Integration time = 400 sec
  • Threshold = 9 sigma = 1.7 E-23 W
  • Processing bandwidth = .5 GHz
  • Frequency range = 1 to 3 GHz
  • Number of relooks = 3
  • Total time for search = 6.3 years

# of targets = 100,000 stars

ts seti observations with 1ht24
TS SETI Observations with 1hT
  • 100 m equivalent
  • Number of beams = 12
  • Bin width = 0.01 Hz
  • Integration time = 400 sec
  • Threshold = 9 sigma = 1.7 E-23 W
  • Processing bandwidth = .5 GHz
  • Frequency range = 1 to 10 GHz
  • Number of relooks = 3
  • Total time for search = 8 years

# of targets = 100,000 stars

ss seti observations with 1ht
SS SETI Observations with 1hT
  • 100 m equivalent
  • Number of beams = 100
  • Bin width = 0.01 Hz
  • Integration time = 150 sec
  • Threshold = 25 sigma = 9.3 E-23 W
  • Processing bandwidth = 1GHz
  • Frequency range = 1 to 3 GHz
  • Number of relooks = 1
  • Total time for search = 11 years

+30 to +60 Declination

slide27
In 20 year array

lifetime, the

1hT can do both:

TS with 12 beams

SS with 100 beams

Phoenix

S IV

1hT TS

1hT SS

Log (Merit)

Log (EIRP)

for seti we don t know28
Where To Look

At What Frequency

When To Look

For What Signal

From How Far

All The Sensitivity We Can Get!!!

This Is a

Job For

SKA

For SETI, We Don’t Know...
  • Stars! A Million Or More
seti observations with ska
SETI Observations with SKA
  • Factor of 100 in sensitivity over the 1hT observations
  • Factor of 100 decrease in transmitter EIRP for current target star list
  • Factor of 10 in distance or 1000 times as many stars for current limit of 1012 W EIRP
seti issues
SETI Issues
  • Targeted searches prefer large FOV
    • multiplexing advantage
  • Sky surveys prefer all sky imaging
    • tiles or Luneberg lenses
    • probably can’t afford high resolution processing
    • transients are attractive possibility (OSS for strong transients - 1020 ops)
seti issues31
SETI Issues
  • Targeted searches prefer large FOV
  • Sky surveys prefer all sky imaging
  • 1-10 thousand km maximum baselines? OK
    • pencil beams all too small for background stars
  • Maximum instantaneous BW
  • Frequency range 0.5-10 GHz
seti observations with ska32
Bets on Moore’s LawSETI Observations with SKA
  • Bin width = 0.01 Hz
  • Integration time = 1000 sec
  • Threshold = 11 sigma = 1.2 E-23 W
  • Processing bandwidth = 9 GHz
  • Number of beams = 10
  • Frequency range = 1 to 10 GHz
  • Number of relooks = 3
  • Total time for search = 10 years
  • Total number of targets= 1,000,000
slide33
Conclusions:A sensitive search of amillion nearby stars will takeabout 10 yearswith the SKA
  • It can be donein parallel withtraditional RA,assuming - 10 beams 9 GHz BW

SKA

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