better learning through structured teaching douglas fisher l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Better Learning Through Structured Teaching Douglas Fisher PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Better Learning Through Structured Teaching Douglas Fisher

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 31

Better Learning Through Structured Teaching Douglas Fisher - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 236 Views
  • Uploaded on

Better Learning Through Structured Teaching Douglas Fisher. TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY. “I do it”. Focus Lesson. Guided Instruction. “We do it”. “You do it together”. Collaborative. “You do it alone”. Independent. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY. A Structure for Instruction that Works.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Better Learning Through Structured Teaching Douglas Fisher' - tam


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

“I do it”

Focus Lesson

Guided Instruction

“We do it”

“You do it

together”

Collaborative

“You do it

alone”

Independent

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

A Structure for Instruction that Works

(c) Frey & Fisher, 2008

in some classrooms
In some classrooms …

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

“I do it”

Focus Lesson

“You do it

alone”

Independent

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

(c) Frey & Fisher, 2008

in some classrooms4
In some classrooms …

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

“You do it

alone”

Independent

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

(c) Frey & Fisher, 2008

and in some classrooms
And in some classrooms …

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

“I do it”

Focus Lesson

Guided Instruction

“We do it”

“You do it

alone”

Independent

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

(c) Frey & Fisher, 2008

slide6

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

“I do it”

Focus Lesson

Guided Instruction

“We do it”

“You do it

together”

Collaborative

“You do it

alone”

Independent

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

A Structure for Instruction that Works

(c) Frey & Fisher, 2008

modeling
Modeling
  • Why?
    • Humans mimic or imitate
    • Students need examples of the type of thinking required
    • Facilitates the use of academic language
modeling comprehension
Modeling Comprehension
  • Inference
  • Summarize
  • Predict
  • Clarify
  • Question

Visualize

Monitor

Synthesize

Evaluate

Connect

word solving
Word Solving
  • Context clues
  • Word parts (prefix, suffix, root, base, cognates)
  • Resources (others, Internet, dictionary)
using text structure
Using Text Structure
  • Informational Texts
    • Problem/Solution, Compare/Contrast, Sequence, Cause/Effect, Description
  • Narrative Texts
    • Story grammar (plot, setting, character)
    • Dialogue
    • Literary devices
using text features
Using Text Features
  • Headings
  • Captions
  • Illustrations
  • Charts
  • Graphs
  • Bold words
  • Table of contents
  • Glossary
  • Index
  • Tables
  • Margin notes
  • Italicized words
slide12

One last thing …

I’ll go back to school

and learn more

about

the brain!

slide13

400+ Page text

“Somites are blocks of dorsal mesodermal cells adjacent to the notochord during vertebrate organogensis.”

“Improved vascular definition in radiographs of the arterial phase or of the venous phase can be procured by a process of subtraction whereby positive and negative images of the overlying skull are superimposed on one another.”

slide19

Read “Non-Traditional” Texts

  • To date, over 100 YouTube videos!
  • PBS (The Secret Life of the Brain)
  • Internet quiz sites about neuroanatomy
  • Talking with peers and others interested in the brain
slide20

But, the midterm comes

17 pages, single spaced

slide21

Besides Some Neuroanatomy, What Have I Learned?

  • You can’t learn from books you can’t read (but you can learn)
  • Reading widely builds background and vocabulary
  • Interacting with others keeps me motivated and clarifies information and extends
  • I have choices and rely on strategies
what do these words mean
What do these words mean?

en: _______________________________

what do these words mean24
What do these words mean?

inter: _____________________________

what s the difference

What’s the difference?

Engagement vs. Interaction

engagement
Engagement
  • to engage: to attract, hold fast, occupy attention of another or oneself
  • en: to cause a person to be in…(a state, condition, place)
  • gage: (archaic) a pledge, a challenge, deposit
  • Spanish translation: ocupar
  • Synonyms: captivate, charm, employ, enthrall, involve, join, practice
interact
Interact
  • interact: to act one upon another, to have some effect on each other
  • inter: among, between, mutually, reciprocally
  • act: to do something, exert energy or force, produce an effect
  • Spanish translation: relacionarse (interaction: acción recíproca)
  • Synonyms: communicate, collaborate, cooperate, combine, connect
engagement or interaction
Engagement or Interaction?
  • Which tasks are designed to promote student engagement?
  • Which tasks are designed to promote student-to-student interaction?
  • Create your own engaging task along with a variation that promotes student-to-student interacton.
what does it take

What does it take?

What does it take to make a task engaging andinteractive?

what does it take to make a task engaging and interactive
What does it take to make a task engaging andinteractive?
  • Enough background knowledge to have something to say.
  • Language support to know how to say it.
  • Topic of interest.
  • An authentic reason to interact.
  • Expectation of, and accountability for, interaction.
  • Established community of learners that encourage and support each other.
  • Understanding of the task.
  • Knowledge of the norms of interaction.
  • Understanding of the benefits of collaborative work.
  • Feedback from teacher and peers.
  • Metacognitive awareness and self-reflection.