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Active Learning Through Interactive Teaching. Dr Kate Exley (2009). Overview. Didactic Teaching – Why do we use the ‘lecture-style’? What are the important features of teaching? Grabbing and holding attention - best & worst Why aim to include variety and interaction?

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overview
Overview
  • Didactic Teaching –
    • Why do we use the ‘lecture-style’?
  • What are the important features of teaching?
  • Grabbing and holding attention - best & worst
  • Why aim to include variety and interaction?
  • Possibilities? And…..Practicalities?
  • Barriers
  • Final remarks
a potted history
A potted history?
  • European monasteries and traveling scholars seeking rare information
  • In a scriptorium a monk at a lectern would reading the manuscript
  • Scholars would copy word for word
  • Derived from the Latin - Lectare

- “to read out loud”

didacticism
Didacticism

“Pure didacticism allows tight instructor

control and passive learning”

Dr Andrew Coleman

why do we use lecture style today
Why do we use ‘Lecture-style’ today?
  • Consistency
  • Efficiency
  • Community
  • ?
  • ?
  • ?
  • Please add 3 other reasons?
large group teaching noel entwistle
Large group teaching(Noel Entwistle)
  • Map v Coverage
  • Illustration v Detailed information
  • Attention span
  • Teaching as a communication
holding attention
Holding attention

Latest research

"Extensive exposure to television and video games may promote development of brain systems that scan and shift attention at the expense of those that focus attention.”

Peter Jenson

large group teaching noel entwistle1
Large group teaching(Noel Entwistle)
  • Map v Coverage
  • Illustration v Detailed information
  • Attention span
  • Teaching as a communication
teaching as a communication
Teaching as a communication

Teacher

Student

Student

Giving out

Receiving

Acting upon

think of the best worst
Think of the ‘Best’ & “Worst”

Think of your experiences as a Learner.

think of the best worst1
Think of the ‘Best’ & “Worst”
  • Best large class?
    • What made it so good?
think of the best worst2
Think of the ‘Best’ & “Worst”
  • Best
    • What made it so good?
  • Worst large class?
    • What made it so bad?
the students view
The Students’ View

Comments :-

  • Enthusiasm and Empathy
  • Level and Pace
  • Variety (as a learner What you Hear, See & Do)
arguments for interaction
Arguments for ‘interaction’
  • To keep attention
  • To enable all students to engage (adjusting pitch and level)
  • Appeal to different learning styles
  • To check understanding
  • Try things out / practise skills
  • To compare different views
  • Feedback to lecturer
  • etc
some suggestions
Some suggestions
  • Buzz groups
  • Mini-quizzes
  • Deciding, e.g. voting
  • Individual tasks
  • Demonstrations
  • Video & other Visuals
  • Interactive handouts
  • Instant summaries
  • etc
types of handout
Types of Handout
  • Reduced PowerPoint slides
  • Skeleton Notes
  • Gapped Notes
  • Handouts containing tasks
handout tasks example 1
Handout Tasks - Example 1

Please work with 2 colleagues to

  • List the three most important points from the lecture.
  • Why have you selected these points
  • Please work with three colleagues to

List the 3 most important points in the lecture

Why have you selected these points?

handout tasks example 2
Handout Tasks Example 2

Please work with 2 colleagues to

  • List the three most important points from the lecture.
  • Why have you selected these points

Please work with three colleagues to

Describe the symptoms of a cat

with a kidney infection

How might you test for this?

3. What treatment would you prescribe?

handout task example 3
Handout Task - Example 3.

Please work on your own for 2 minutes

Plot the given survey data on the axes provided

Identify the point of intersection

What does this tell you about consumer

preferences

handout task example 4
Handout Task - Example 4.

Read the extract provided (interview with a parent)

and discuss with a colleague

1. What are the main fears this mother expresses about her child starting school?

2. As a class teacher, how could you address her worries?

3. What School policies/practices could reduce her concerns?

ideas handout to worksheet
Ideas - Handout to Worksheet
  • Applying knowledge or concepts
  • Solving a problem / setting a question
  • Analysing a case study or example
  • Interpreting data / images etc
  • Reviewing an article / abstract / script etc
  • Representing information differently
  • Making judgements on….Estimating…Predicting…
the practicalities
The practicalities
  • Know why you want students to ‘do’ it.
the practicalities1
The practicalities
  • Know why you want students to ‘do’ it.
  • How will they work?
the practicalities2
The practicalities
  • Know why you want students to ‘do’ it.
  • How will they work?
    • Alone or in pairs?
    • For how long?
    • When in the lecture will the interaction be?
    • Will everybody do the same thing?
    • Etc

What CLEAR instructions will you give to your students

the practicalities3
The practicalities
  • Know why you want students to ‘do’ it.
  • How will they work?
    • Alone or in pairs?
    • For how long? & when in the lecture?
  • What will the end point be?
the practicalities4
The practicalities
  • Know why you want students to ‘do’ it.
  • How will they work?
    • Alone or in pairs?
    • For how long? & when in the lecture?
  • What will the end point be?
    • An answer? A decision? An example? etc
the practicalities5
The practicalities
  • Know why you want students to ‘do’ it.
  • How will they work?
    • Alone or in pairs?
    • For how long? & when in the lecture?
  • What will the end point be?
    • An answer? A decision? An example? etc
  • Do you need to hear back from the students?
the practicalities6
The practicalities
  • Know why you want students to ‘do’ it.
  • How will they work?
    • Alone or in pairs?
    • For how long? & when in the lecture?
  • What will the end point be?
    • An answer? A decision? An example? etc
  • Do you need to hear back from the students?
    • No? (I will show them the answer.)
the practicalities7
The practicalities
  • Know why you want students to ‘do’ it.
  • How will they work?
    • Alone or in pairs?
    • For how long? & when in the lecture?
  • What will the end point be?
    • An answer? A decision? An example? etc
  • Do you need to hear back from the students?
    • No? (I will show them the answer.)
  • But if you do, how will you manage that?
the practicalities8
The practicalities
  • Know why you want students to ‘do’ it.
  • How will they work?
    • Alone or in pairs?
    • For how long? & when in the lecture?
  • What will the end point be?
    • An answer? A decision? An example? etc
  • Do you need to hear back from the students?
    • No? (I will show them the answer.)
  • But if you do, how will you manage that?
    • Voting? Collected views? An OHT acetate? Handsets
discipline control worries
Discipline / Control Worries

Barriers..

  • What do you fear could happen?
  • How can it be avoided?
  • How can it be dealt with?
  • How likely is it really?
quick re cap
Quick re-cap
  • To be clear about
    • What you are trying to achieve?
    • Why you are using a particular approach?
  • Consider how you can get and keep students’ attention?
  • Plan any interaction carefully
  • Be kind to yourself
  • Have a go!
to find out more
To find out more

“Giving a Lecture :

from presenting to teaching” (2009), 2nd ed.

Kate Exley & Reg Dennick

Key Guides for Effective Teaching in Higher Education

Routledge : London

additional reading possibilities
Additional reading possibilities
  • Making Teaching Work : ‘teaching smarter’ in post-compulsory education (2007)
    • Phil Race and Ruth Pickford, Sage
  • Lecturing a Practical Guide
    • Sally Brown and Phil Race, Kogan Page
  • Practical Ideas for Enhancing Lectures (2003)
    • P. Davies, SEDA, London
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