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Supporting pupils

Supporting pupils

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Supporting pupils

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    1. Brian Stewart, HMI National Specialist, support for pupils Supporting pupils

    2. How we inspect support for pupils HMI work in SfP The inclusion agenda Questions and discussion

    3. How we now inspect support for pupils

    4. Underlying rationale Inspections need to focus on the impact of pastoral care, support for the learning of ALL pupils, and the promotion of attainment and achievement for ALL learners A key concern is the NEET group We cant directly get to this group, so we focus on the CHARM groups through pursuing audit trails There are various CHARM groups, and in any particular inspection there will be CHARM groups who are specific to that school

    5. What do we do? Week 1 (scoping): The team identifies key audit trails arising from the schools context (high attainers, MOR pupils, classic CHARM groups, etc.), identifies pupils within these, and where they can be found during week 2 Week 2: The pupil support inspector follows these trails, investigating further as necessary and liaising with CTM Subject inspectors also follow these trails on their patch Pupil support is the responsibility of all staff, and its inspection is the job of the whole team

    6. What do we do? Week 1 (scoping): The team identifies key audit trails arising from the schools context (high attainers, MOR pupils, classic CHARM groups, etc.), identifies pupils within these, and where they can be found during week 2 Week 2: The pupil support inspector follows these trails, investigating further as necessary and liaising with CTM Subject inspectors also follow these trails on their patch Pupil support is the responsibility of all staff, and its inspection is the job of the whole team

    7.

    8. The report Background Key strengths How well does the school promote achievement for all? How good is the environment for learning? Leading and improving the school What happens next? Appendix 1: Indicators of quality Appendix 2: Summary of questionnaire responses Appendix 3: Attainment in Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) National Qualifications How can you contact us?

    9. The report There is a bullet on the PSE programme within the curriculum paragraph. The impact of curricular and vocational guidance appears in the curriculum paragraph. The impact of learning support and other measures are incorporated within the meeting needs paragraph, which is wider and bigger than before, and represents a key input. The delivery of PSE contributes to teaching and learning evaluations. The impact of the PSE programme appears within the personal and social development paragraph, which incorporates wider achievement and is evaluative There is a paragraph on pastoral care (in the environment for learning section). Reports now tell a clearer story and relate better to the schools context.

    10. Any questions so far?

    11. Wider HMIE work in support for pupils

    12. Identifying good practice Good practice visits to explore in more detail the features of very good practice The aim is to have a resource on HMIE website to support the profession in examining their practice and finding sources of best practice

    13. Emerging good practice Successful PSE courses where they Are well taught, with modern, relevant resources Have a clear rationale Roles of staff are successful when All staff accept responsibility to look out for pupils, such as changes in demeanour and attitude and enable early intervention Key staff have the whole picture of each pupil in their caseload and co-ordinate effective intervention Each pupil has a member of staff who is accessible to them and receptive to discussion and subtle requests for help There is a continuous spectrum of support for pupils, but overall responsibility for each pupil remains clear

    14. Concerns? PSE courses: Too often boring and repetitive or fragmented Can we differentiate better? Can we link better to other school experiences? Should it be certificated? Are they up-to-date (cyber-bullying, identity theft, grooming)? Pupils sometimes slip away from pastoral care staff as they (the pupils) work more with SfL, FE, other agencies, or the DHT Flow of information: Are very early concerns easy to pass to guidance staff? Do guidance staff give enough feedback? Are some groups of pupils invisible?

    15. Additional issues The impact of new management structures arising from TP21 The widening inclusion landscape

    16. Comments, questions and suggestions so far?

    17. The inclusion agenda

    18. Inclusion By inclusion we mean taking positive action and intervening in order to: enable achievement for all, with each individual achieving to his or her potential, and achievement being defined in terms of the broad range of outcomes of the formal and informal curriculum, and all experiences which give rise to it; acknowledge, address and embrace social and cultural diversity; enable the participation of all individual learners and groups of learners by means of appropriate pathways for progression; and focus on and address the needs of all learners and removing or reducing any barriers, so that learning is personalised and they are enabled to meet their potential.

    19. Equality and equity The term equality of opportunity is used for those approaches which aim to ensure that people are not excluded from particular activities. It implies equal access to education or other services. Equity means treating people fairly, but not necessarily treating people the same. It is about receiving fair treatment, that is, a response which meets individual needs. It does not necessarily mean receiving the same treatment.

    20. HMIEs CHARM task This task involves a group of HMI in looking at provision and support for CHARM groups across education authorities: How are these groups identified? What is done to support them? How do schools know they have been successful?

    21. The classic CHARM groups Looked after children Children of travellers Children with EAL Children of asylum seekers Children with additional support needs Low attaining children Pupils with high absence rates Chronically ill children Teenage parents

    22. Emerging CHARM groups LGBT Children with mental health issues, or those dealing with their parents mental health issues (perhaps through drug dependency) Children with a range of other difficult home circumstances Young carers Pupils who could be attaining and achieving more highly

    23. HMIEs role To inspect support for these pupils within schools, and within INEA, CP and SfC inspections To collect and promote best practice To maintain a focus on these groups so that the system remains aware of them and the need to support them

    24. Other HMIE tasks Examining the impact of: Curricular flexibility Offsite behaviour units CLD links with schools

    25. HMIEs work on inclusion

    26. New approaches to teaching are not that much different to excellent practice across the years It is every teachers job to meet the educational needs of those in their class And that means taking cognizance of and lowering or eliminating barriers to learning List from Missing Out, table Page 16 in The Journey to Excellence New approaches to teaching are not that much different to excellent practice across the years It is every teachers job to meet the educational needs of those in their class And that means taking cognizance of and lowering or eliminating barriers to learning List from Missing Out, table Page 16 in The Journey to Excellence

    27. Final questions and points? Brian.Stewart@hmie.gsi.gov.uk