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Module Three

Module Three

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Module Three

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  1. Module Three What’s Expected of Me? (DO) WE3-25-09

  2. What’s Expected of Me? (DO) “DO” provides you with a vast set of skills to be effective in your position by employing the skills in the leadership skills toolbox. These how-to skills include: communication, problem solving, planning, and resolving conflict. 1. How do you create a vision, goals, and plans to effectively get a task done well? 2. How can you use the Start, Stop, Continue method for assessing progress and delivering feedback in a nonthreatening and highly effective manner? 3. How do you determine the stage of your team’s development so as to most properly use the Leading EDGE™ to guide your progress? 4. How do you resolve conflict and communicate effectively? WE3-25-09

  3. What’s Expected of Me? (DO) • Position Duties as Servant Leadership • Defining Success in Your Position • Ten Tips for Being a Good Patrol Leader • Eleven Leadership Skills • Communication, Problem Solving, Planning, and Resolving Conflict WE3-25-09

  4. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) Duties: • Functions as an Assistant Scoutmaster. • Performs duties as assigned by Scoutmaster. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  5. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) Duties: • Runs all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference. • Runs the patrol leaders’ council meeting. • Appoints other troop junior leaders with the advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster. • Assigns duties and responsibilities to junior leaders • Assists the Scoutmaster with junior leader training. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout spirit. WE3-25-09

  6. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) Duties: • Helps the senior patrol leader lead meetings and activities. • Runs the troop in the absence of the senior patrol leader. • Helps train and supervise the troop scribe, quartermaster, instructor, librarian, historian, and the chaplain aide. • Serves as a member of the patrol leaders’ council. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  7. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Patrol Leader (PL) Duties: • Appoints the Assistant Patrol leader. • Represents the patrol on the patrol leaders’ council • Plans and steers patrol meetings. • Helps Scouts advance (knows what the members of his patrol need in order to advance!). • Acts as the chief recruiter of new Scouts to join the patrol. • Keeps patrol members informed. • Knows what his patrol members and other leaders can do. • Sets the example. • Wears the uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  8. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Assistant Patrol Leader (APL) Duties: • Helps the patrol leader plan and steer patrol meetings and activities. • Helps him keep patrol members informed. • Helps the patrol get ready for all Troop activities. • Represents his patrol at patrol leaders’ council meetings when the patrol leader cannot attend. • Lends a hand controlling the patrol and building patrol spirit. • Sets a good example. • Wears the uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  9. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Cheermaster Duties: • Plans, conducts, and/or ensures at least one campfire program at all Troop campouts. • Leads the Troop in at least one song or yell during every regular troop meting. • Works with patrols and patrol leaders to ensure that each patrol has a patrol cheer and a patrol flag. • Works with SPL and ASPL to ensure that the Troop has a Troop cheer. • Set a good example. • Enthusiastically, consistently, and correctly wears the Scout uniform. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  10. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Troop Instructor Duties: • Teaches basic Scouting skills in troop and patrols. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  11. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Troop Guide Duties: • Introduces new Scouts to troop operations. • Guides new Scouts through early Scouting activities. • Shields new Scouts from harassment by older Scouts. • Helps new Scouts earn First Class in their first year. • Teaches basic Scout skills. • Coaches the patrol leader of the new Scout patrol on his duties. • Works with the patrol leader at patrol leaders’ council meetings. • Works with the patrol leader at patrol leaders’ council meetings. • Attends patrol leaders’ council meetings WITH the patrol leader of the new Scout patrol. • Assists the assistant Scoutmaster with training. • Counsels individual Scouts on Scouting challenges. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  12. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Quartermaster Duties: • Keeps records on patrol and troop equipment. • Makes sure equipment is in good working condition. • Issues equipment and makes sure it’s returned in good condition. • Makes suggestions for new or replacement items. • Works with the troop committee member responsible for equipment. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  13. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Chaplain Aide Duties: • Assists the troop chaplain with religious services at troop activities. • Tells Scouts about the religious emblem program for their faith. • Makes sure religious holidays are considered during troop program planning • Helps plan for religious observance in troop activities. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  14. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Troop Scribe Duties: • Attends and keeps log of patrol leaders’ council meetings • Records individual Scout attendance and dues payments • Records individual Scout advancement progress • Works with the troop committee member responsible for records and finance. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  15. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Den Chief Duties: • Knows the purposes of Cub Scouting. • Helps Cub Scouts advance through Cub Scout ranks. • Encourages Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation. • Assists with activities in the den meetings. • Is a friend to the boys in the den. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  16. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Troop Librarian Duties: • sets up and cares for troop library • records new troop books and pamphlets • runs troop lending library and follows up on late returns • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  17. Position Duties as Servant Leadership Troop Historian Duties: • gathers pictures and facts about past troop activities • keeps troop historical file and/or scrapbook • cares for troop trophies, ribbons, souvenirs • keeps information about former troop members • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout Spirit. WE3-25-09

  18. Defining Success in Your Position • Do people believe that you are willing to sacrifice your own self-interest for the good of the group? • Do people believe that you want to hear their ideas and will value them? • Do people believe that you will understand what is happening in their lives and how it affects them? • Do people come to you when the chips are down or when something traumatic has happened in their lives? • Do others believe that you have a strong awareness for what is going on? WE3-25-09

  19. Defining Success in Your Position • Do others follow your requests because they want to as opposed to because they “have to”? • Do others communicate their ideas and vision for the organization when you are around? • Do others have the confidence in your ability to anticipate the future and its consequences? • Do others believe you are preparing the organization to make a positive difference in the world? • Do people believe that you are committed to helping them develop and grow? • Do people feel a strong sense of community in the organization that you lead? WE3-25-09

  20. Defining Success in Your Position Now, the learning and experiences involved are part of the Scout's leadership by • Leading to ongoing yearly to plan and implement the troop activity program. • Leading to ongoing monthly program planning in the PLC. • The SPL is involved in gathering information and preparing for the meeting. • Highlights program planning and execution as an ongoing, continuous process. WE3-25-09

  21. Defining Success in Your Position Also there are many other opportunities for junior leader can do • Attend regularly on an ongoing basis at: • PLC meetings • Troop campouts • Troop outings • Special leadership campouts, outings and events. • Intended to rotate on a 3 year basis to: • Provide ongoing, relevant and fresh training experiences for all scouts. • Involve senior scouts as teachers/trainers for younger scouts. WE3-25-09

  22. Defining Success in Your Position • You may also know how to • Organize a patrol • Use a duty roster • Plan menus and cost control • Identify resources • Stimulate advancement • Encourage and control patrol competition • Teach skills • Be safe on troop and patrol outing • Manage troop and patrol equipment • Teamwork exercises • Problem solving skills and techniques • Conflict resolution. • Ethics in Action WE3-25-09

  23. Defining Success in Your Position • and other tools • Troop calendar • Troop meetings • Troop activities • Patrol leaders' council (PLC) • Public service • Outdoor activities WE3-25-09

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  35. Ten Tips for Being a Good Patrol Leader Keep Your Word. Don’t make promises you can’t keep. Be Fair to All. A good leader shows no favorites. Don’t allow friendships to keep you from being fair to all members of your patrol. Know who likes to do what, and assign duties to patrol members by what they like to do. Be a Good Communicator. You don’t need a commanding voice to be a good leader, but you must be willing to step out front with an effective “Let’s go.” A good leader knows how to get and give information so that everyone understands what’s going on. Be Flexible. Everything doesn’t always go as planned. Be prepared to shift to “plan B” when “plan A” doesn’t work. Be Organized. The time you spend planning will be repaid many times over. At patrol meetings, record who agrees to do each task, and fill out the duty roster before going Camping. WE3-25-09

  36. Ten Tips for Being a Good Patrol Leader Delegate. Some leaders assume that the job will not get done unless they do it themselves. Most people like to be challenged with a task. Empower your patrol members to do things they have never tried. Set an Example. The most important thing you can do is lead by example. Whatever you do, your patrol members are likely to do the same. A cheerful attitude can keep everyone’s spirits up. Be Consistent. Nothing is more confusing than a leader who is one way one moment and another way a short time later. If your patrol knows what to expect from you, they will more likely respond positively to your leadership. Give Praise. The best way to get credit is to give it away. Often a “Nice job” is all the praise necessary to make a Scout feel he is contributing to the efforts of the patrol. Ask for Help. Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You have many resources at your disposal. When confronted with a situation you don’t know how to handle, ask someone with more experience for some advice and direction. WE3-25-09

  37. Eleven Leadership Skills 1. UNDERSTANDING THE NEEDS AND CHARACTERISTIC Each individual member of the group has certain needs and characteristics. 1. A leader should understand his own needs and characteristics. 2. A leader should understand the needs and characteristics of each member of the group. This helps the leader to deal with each person as an individual, to treat that individual with respect, and to help the person grow. 3. This understanding helps in planning the program and in getting things done. 4. This understanding creates trust and builds confidence among group members. Through conversation and informal surveys of post members, try to find out: • Why they joined your post • What they expect from the post’s programs • What their major interests are • What their plans for the future area OF THE TROOP WE3-25-09

  38. Eleven Leadership Skills 2. KNOWING AND USING THE RESOURCES OF THE GROUP Resources include all those things necessary to do a job. Resources also include people, because people have knowledge and skills. Knowledge is what a person learns through familiarity or experience-what you know. Skill is the ability to use what you know. Attitude includes the desire to do something-motivation-and the belief that you can do it-confidence. When the leader uses the knowledge and skills of group members to get a job done, the members gain experience and improve skills. They also develop a positive attitude toward using a skill. • Keep the troop’s resource survey up-to-date and use it in planning. • Understand the purpose and resources of your chartered organization. • Survey the member’s parents; include them in your program capability inventory. • Find out your member’s skills, interests, and resources. WE3-25-09

  39. Eleven Leadership Skills 3. COMMUNICATING To improve your skills in getting information: • Pay attention and listen carefully. • Make notes and • Ask questions and repeat your understanding of what was said. To improve your skills in giving information: • Be sure others are listening before you speak. • Speak slowly and clearly. • Draw diagrams, if needed. Ask those receiving information to take notes. • Have the listeners repeat their understanding of what was said. Encourage questions. WE3-25-09

  40. Eleven Leadership Skills 4. PLANNING Planning is an important part of everything we do in Scouting. The following is a simple process for planning: • Consider the task and objectives. What do you want to accomplish? • Consider the resources-equipment, knowledge, skills, and attitudes. • Consider the alternatives. Brainstorm. • Reach a decision, evaluating each option. • Write the plan down and review it with the post. • Execute the plan. • Evaluate the plan. WE3-25-09

  41. Eleven Leadership Skills 5. CONTROLLING GROUP PERFORMANCE A leader influences the performance of the group and individual members through his actions. Why is control needed? A group needs control as an engine needs a throttle – to keep it from running itself into the ground. A group works together best when everybody is headed in the same direction. If a plan is to e properly carried out, someone must lead the effort. Control is a function that the group assigns to the leader to get the job done. Control happens as a result of recognizing the difference between where the group is and where the group is going. The leader is responsible for developing a plan to help the group get to its goal. Setting the example is the most effective way of controlling the group. When working with post members, do the following: • Continually observe the group. Know what is happening and the attitude of the group. • Make your instructions clear and pertinent. • Pitch in and help when necessary. • Quickly deal with disruption. Guide the post toward self-discipline. WE3-25-09

  42. Eleven Leadership Skills 6. EVALUATING Evaluating helps measure the performance of a group in getting a job done and working together. It suggests ways in which the group can improve its performance. There are two basic categories of evaluation questions. After any event or activity, ask these questions: Getting the job done. • Was the job done? • Was the job done right? • Was the job done on time? Keeping the group together- • Were relationships between group members helped or hurt? • Was participation equally distributed among group members? • Did the group enjoy the activity? • Did the group handle conflicts well? WE3-25-09

  43. Eleven Leadership Skills 7. SETTING THE EXAMPLE Setting the example is probably the most important leadership skill. It is the most effective way to show others the proper way to conduct themselves, and is even more effective than verbal communication. Without this skill, all the other skills will be useless. One way to think about setting the example is to imagine yourself as a member of a group and think about how you would like your leader to act. WE3-25-09

  44. Eleven Leadership Skills 8. SHARING LEADERSHIP While there are various ways to exercise leadership, the goal of Scouting leadership is exemplified in a quote from the ancient Chinese philosopher, Lao-Tzu: “But of a good leader…When the work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say, ‘We did this ourselves.’” The Scouting leaders want to give troop and patrol members the skills he possesses, not to use those skills in ways that keep the troop weak or dependent. He offers leadership opportunities to troop members and teaches them the skills they need. WE3-25-09

  45. Eleven Leadership Skills 9. COUNSELING Counseling is important • To help people solve problems • To encourage or reassure • To help a Scout reach his potential Counseling can be effective when a person is • Undecided – he can’t make a decision • Confused – he doesn’t have enough information or has too much information. • Locked in – he doesn’t know any alternatives. How do you counsel? • First, try to understand the situation. Listen carefully. Summarize. Check the facts. Paraphrase to make sure you understand. • Second, help list as many options as possible. • Third, help list the disadvantages of the options. • Fourth, help list the advantages of the options. • Finally, let the person decide on a solution. The counselor’s role is to give encouragement and information, not advice. WE3-25-09

  46. Eleven Leadership Skills 10. REPRESENTING THE GROUP Where do you represent the troop? PLC leaders represent the troop at troop committee meetings, and planning conferences, and to the chartered organization. The senior patrol leader represents the troop in two situations: • Without consultation - when he or she doesn’t have the opportunity to consult with post officers about a decision • With consultation - when he or she can meet with post officers about the issue In some cases the SPL must represent the troop decision exactly; in other cases, he must use independent judgment. You will need to solicit and analyze members’ views and attempt to represent those views within the guidelines of your troop, your chartered organization, and Scouting. WE3-25-09

  47. Eleven Leadership Skills 11. EFFECTIVE TEACHING Effective teaching is a process to increase the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of the group and its members. The focus is on learning, not teaching. For teaching to be effective, learning must take place. The steps of effective teaching include • Choosing the learning objectives • Providing a discovery experience that helps the learner understand the need for the skill • Demonstrating or explaining the skill • Allowing the learner to practice the skill • Evaluating the process WE3-25-09

  48. Slicing Up the Leadership Pie Leadership can be a bit like eating apple pie; eat an entire pie by yourself and there will be none left to share with anyone else. Chances are you will get a stomachache, too. Cut that pie into pieces and give each patrol member a slice though, and everyone can enjoy it and will come away from the experience feeling good about the whole thing. WE3-25-09

  49. Communication Skills • Teaching is communicating. You’re sharing information. You’re moving ideas from inside of your head to the insides of the heads of others.  • Good communications skills go a long way in making teaching possible. • Ask participants to point out a few of the communications skills you have been using to teach this session on the Teaching EDGE. If you wish, you can ask them for a brief evaluation of your communications skills, using Stop, Start, Continue. The point here is to make participants aware of the power of communications skills in teaching effectively. WE3-25-09

  50. Communication Skills Communications Skills Checklist ___ Neutral Position. The speaker stands comfortably before the patrol, hands at his sides. ___ Feet. The speaker positions himself where everyone can see and hear him. If possible, the speaker moves around during the presentation. ___ Hands. The speaker uses his hands as communicating tools. ___ Mouth. The speaker communicates loudly enough for everyone to hear, and clearly enough for everyone to understand. He varies the tone of his voice as he talks. ___ Eyes. The speaker makes eye contact with listeners. ___ Ears. The speaker is aware of his audience. WE3-25-09