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WELCOME To

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  1. WELCOMETo Transition IEP: What’s New And A Little Review

  2. What You Need To Get Started For The Presentation You should see 3 boxes/windows on your screen – (1) The camera and voice box (Camera & Voice) (2) The question and answer box (Chat Q & A) (3) The presentation box. As presenter, I will be answering questions throughout the presentation. •  If you have a question, you can type it in the Chat Q & A. At the bottom of the Chat Q & A box you will see a small box labeled “Question:”. Type your question here and then click on the arrow button to the right of the box. Your question will appear in red in the larger box under Chat Q & A. No one else in this webinar other than the presenter will be able to see your question.

  3. As presenter I can see everyone’s questions. Throughout the presentation I will stop and answer questions. The question will appear in black in the larger box under Chat Q & A. • This webinar will be recorded. The webinar, questions and answers, and slide show will be posted to our web site after the meeting. • You can reach this page by visiting the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community (IIDC) web site, selecting “Centers”, “Center on Community Living and Careers”, “Events and Announcements”, or using the link provided below. • http://www.iidc.indiana.edu/index.php?pageId=62

  4. What We Hope To Accomplish • Improve compliance for the Transition IEP (Indicator 13) • Learn what is new for the Transition Requirement Checklist • Review how to document writing measurable postsecondary goals, age-appropriate assessments and measurable annual goals.

  5. New Transition Requirement Checklist • Go to www.doe.in.gov/exceptional/speced/monitoring.html

  6. How Do You Know The Student Was Invited? • Student name on invite list • Dated prior to the date of the case conference (e.g., adequate notice CCC meetings, 511 IAC 7-42-2).

  7. Present Level Of Academic Achievement & Functional Performance • What do I already know about this student that would be helpful in developing postsecondary goals? (e.g., review of records, grades, ISTEP, NWEA). • What information do I need to know about this student to determine postsecondary goals? (e.g., skills, aptitudes, interests, strengths, preferences, needs). • What methods will provide this information (e.g., transition assessments)? • How will the assessment data be collected and used in the IEP process (summarized)? [Greene, G. & Kochar-Bryant, C.(2003)]

  8. What Do We Know?: Present Levels of Academic and Functional Performance • It is stated in positive terms and highlights strengths (starts with strengths, preferences, interests). • It references the most recently attained skills from the previous years goals. • It is measurable in that you have specified a grade or age-level performance if it is clear or definable through state standards or other curriculum (e.g., scope and sequence materials, developmental materials or testing materials).

  9. What Do We Know?: Present Levels of Academic and Functional Performance • It should be functional and evident in the student’s routine activities of daily living in environment such as classroom, bus, community, lunchroom. • It is relevant in that it is connected to the student’s disability and their needs.

  10. What Do We Know?: Present Levels of Academic and Functional Performance • It is the starting point from which this year’s progress is to be measured and evaluated – it is the baseline data to the proposed annual goals (and short-term objectives/benchmarks) to be included (same procedure and criteria of measurement).

  11. What Do We Know?: Present Levels of Academic and Functional Performance • Data can come from a variety of sources: • Curriculum rubrics • Rubrics • Current IEP • Checklists, skills and interests • Career, transition and vocational assessments • Student work samples and portfolios • Family and staff observations and records • Behavior and attendance records • Systematic observation of behavior or task analysis • It can pass the Stranger Test or Move-in Test

  12. Example Strengths of student: James is a 15 year old student who seems to enjoy school. James is hard working and attentive in class. He has a good sense of humor and works well with others. He is polite and caring. James enjoys science and hands-on activities. He enjoys working on cars with his father. His father is in construction. He would like a job either as a mechanic or in construction.

  13. Present levels: NWEA Scores; ISTEP Scores (M=378/517; E/LA = 427/516). James is performing well-below grade level and needs significant supports and modifications in most of his academic classes. His is reading at the 3rd grade level, however he can comprehend higher level material when read to him. He has difficulty using phonetic skills when decoding words and struggles with word recognition. He feels he has made progress and is reading better than last year. James says studying harder and practicing his decoding strategies have helped. Testing suggests that his writing skills are at the 3rd grade level.

  14. Present levels: He has weak spelling skills and lacks proper punctuation /capitalization which impacts readability of written sentences. He is currently completing a modified pre-algebra curriculum with relative success. James uses a calculator to accommodate for his difficulty with basic computational skills (division, fractions, subtraction with borrowing). Testing (WJ-III ‘08) suggests that Joe performs at about the 4th grade level. He needs more time to complete problems and have the story problems read aloud. His weakness in reasoning, memory and processing speed significantly impacts his ability to pick up, process and retain information in academic areas.

  15. Present Levels: What do I already know about this student that would be helpful in developing postsecondary goals? • We know he is a pleasant, good manner person • We know he has low academic skills 3rd – 4th grade levels • He is pursuing a diploma • He likes hands-on activities • Gets along well and works well with others • He has an interest in cars. • Father is involved and fairly supportive

  16. Present Levels: What information do I need to know about this student to determine postsecondary goals? • Other career interests besides cars (based on influence from father’s career)- aptitudes, etc. • Independent living skills • Future vision-what he sees himself doing • Self-determination skills • Future supports he may need • Type of training he will need for his career • Other experiences he may need • Given the data, diploma vs certificate discussion

  17. Present levels: What methods will provide this information (e.g., transition assessments)? • Career interest inventory been conducted? • Independent living assessment • Move toward a career academic sequence or more functional academics? • Self-determination assessment? • Career and orientation class? • Specific projects in various content classes?

  18. Things to Remember . . . Age-Appropriate Transition Assessments • There is specific data and/or information related to interests, preferences, strengths and needs for each postsecondary area and targeted postsecondary expectation (education/training, employment, and living). • The findings from the data and information is summarized (type of assessment is not just listed). • If Independent living area is not needed, you provide evidence of why?

  19. Summary of Findings For Age Appropriate Transition Assessment for James After high school, James would like to pursue a career in construction like his father or as a mechanic and attend a technical school. He has been working with the guidance counselor to explore possibilities at the Career Center and a career academic sequence pathway. He will receive a Career Interest Inventory through the guidance department this upcoming year as well as be given the “What’s My Bag” assessment in resource room. Based on the “Planning for Community Life” worksheet and discussion with James and his father, his father will help support him with basic daily life skills, like managing money, finding a place to live and support for a job. He eventually would like to live by himself in a house or apartment. He will not need an ILS goal.

  20. Another Way to Present the Information Education and Training: James would like to pursue a career in construction like his father or as a mechanic and attend a technical school. He has been working with the guidance counselor to explore possibilities at the Career Center and a career academic sequence pathway. Employment: James would like to pursue a career in construction like his father or as a mechanic and attend a technical school. He will receive a Career Interest Inventory through the guidance department this upcoming year as well as be given the “What’s My Bag” assessment in resource room. Independent Living: Based on the “Planning for Community Life” worksheet and discussion with James and his father, his father will help support him with basic daily life skills, like managing money, finding a place to live and support for a job. He eventually would like to live by himself in a house or apartment. No ILS goal needed

  21. Transition Assessment • Information is built upon over the years (middle school through high school) • Can you determine the students strengths, preferences, interests and needs to support the each of the measurable postsecondary goals • Answer the question: What else do I need to know about this student to help him/her develop post-school goals?

  22. James Measurable Postsecondary Goals • Education and Training – After high school, James will attend a technical school to study construction or mechanics • Employment – James will obtain a job in construction or mechanics. • Independent Living Skills – NA

  23. USE ACTION AND MEASURABLE TERMS “Live” “Utilize” or “Use” “Get a job” “O b t a I n” “Participate in” “Will get a job” “Will Work” “Enroll”

  24. What NOT to Write? • Non-measurable words like “hopes to”, “explore”, “would like to”, “wants to go to college” or “will try to find a job”, “wants to live on his own” • Write 2-3 goals in one statement • Add too much verbiage . . . . .where you have to go looking for the actual goal

  25. Another Way to Present the Information Education and Training: James would like to pursue a career in construction like his father or as a mechanic and attend a technical school. He will be working with the guidance counselor to explore possibilities at the Career Center and a career academic sequence requirements. Employment: James would like to pursue a career in construction like his father or as a mechanic and attend a technical school. He will receive a Career Interest Inventory through the guidance department this upcoming year as well as be given the “What’s My Bag” assessment in resource room. Independent Living: Based on the “Planning for Community Life” worksheet and discussion with James and his father, his father will help support him with basic daily life skills, like managing money, finding a place to live and support for a job. He eventually would like to live by himself in a house or apartment. No ILS goal needed.

  26. JamesA Year Later. . . . • Based on updated assessment information and CC discussion, James goals will remain the same. OR • Based on updated assessment information, academic performance, James’ Education and Training goal has changed. • REMEMBER: Starting in middle school or 14, the postsecondary goals are broad with the intention that every year we learn more about the student and the goals can become more specific (type of college – technical, 2-year) or career interest (e.g., retail, business)

  27. What Do We Know?: Measurable Annual Goals • Meet the student’s needs (as identified in the present level) that result from the child’s disability. • Connection between the measurable postschool goal (expectations); present levels; and needs of student • It is measurable it if reflects performance or behavior that can be measured or observed (e.g., progress monitoring)

  28. What Do We Know?: Measurable Annual Goals • Identifies what knowledge, skills and/or behaviors a student is expected to demonstrate or do within the period of time the IEP is implemented • A student’s needs generally relate to domains such as (but not limited to) reading, writing, math, listening, organization, time management, study skills, communication, social skills, memory, visual perception, auditory perception, attention, behavior, self-determination, self-advocacy, career, daily living skills, and community skills.

  29. What Do We Know?: Measurable Annual Goals • Standards-based goals are not restatements of the standards, they are the approximations to support the student’s movement (progress) toward proficiency at grade level (Effective Goal Writing, 2009). • Focuses on the area of need (as described in the present level) that will make the biggest difference to the student (in the current and future environments). • At least one of the annual goals must support each of the measurable postsecondary goals

  30. Well-Written Annual Goal Components • GIVEN WHAT – describes the conditions that will need to be in place for the goal (or benchmark) to be completed • WHO – the student • DOES WHAT – describes observable behavior (specific action) that the student will do to complete the goal (or benchmark) • WHEN – relates to a specific point in time or timeframe when something will have been learned or completed

  31. Well-Written Annual Goal Components • HOW MUCH • Mastery – describes the performance accuracy of the behavior to be considered completed • Criteria – describes how many times the behavior must be observed for the goal or (objectives/benchmarks) to be considered completed or mastered • HOW WILL IT BE MEASURED – describes performance data [www.calstate.org/iep]

  32. Measurable Annual Goals SMART GOALS • Specific • Measurable • Action words • Relevant and realistic • Timeframe or time limited

  33. Annual Goal: Stranger Test • Are the words that describe the student’s behavior observable (specific action) that the student will do to complete the goal? • Is this goal is relevant to the student’s learning needs? • Is it clear what the student will be doing when he/she reaches this goal? • It is clear how this knowledge or skill will be measured? • Can this goal help the student achieve one of his/her postsecondary goals?

  34. James Annual Goal Example • James will use a word identification strategy to decode multisyllabic words in content areas with 90% accuracy (as measured by progress monitoring method) • Number of words attempted/ number of words said accurately in a reading passages • Measured every two weeks

  35. James Annual Goal Example • James will demonstrate mastery of 5th grade standards indicated below by scoring 80% or higher on classroom assignments and quizzes that specifically address the targeted standards. • Math 5.1.4 Interpret percents as a part of a hundred. Find decimals and percents equivalent for common fractions . . . . . • Math 5.2.2 Add and subtract fractions (including mixed numbers with different denominators.

  36. Other Examples • James will demonstrate his self-advocacy skills by communicating his accommodation needs to his general education teachers • James will demonstrate his organizational skills by bringing his assignment notebook to every class, record his assignments in his notebook daily, and check his assignment off (self-monitoring) as it is completed. (this could be measured either as a single point based on instances or a rubric to measure the stages of being organized)