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Welcome to Week 3!. Please Sign In & T urn I n:. Agenda for today…. Journal 2 “The Changing American Family” questions Any late work. Review Quiz Reading Assign the first writing style paragraph Chapter 18 Vocabulary Begin Chapter 3 End of Class Quiz. Review Quiz.

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welcome to week 3
Welcome to Week 3!

Please Sign In & Turn In:

Agenda for today…

Journal 2

“The Changing American Family” questions

Any late work

Review Quiz

Reading

Assign the first writing style paragraph Chapter 18

Vocabulary

Begin Chapter 3

End of Class Quiz

review quiz
Review Quiz

Last week we discussed how to create topic sentences.

Please write down what the subject and controlling idea for these topic sentences?

  • Body weigh exercise is a great way to loose weight and build muscle.
  • Sacramento and New Orleans are surprisingly similar.
  • Apes make horrible pets.
  • A good attitude is one of the most important things.
review quiz1
Review Quiz

Last week we discussed how to create topic sentences.

Please write down what the subject and controlling idea for these topic sentences?

  • Body weigh exercise is a great way to loose weight and build muscle.
  • Sacramento and New Orleansare surprisingly similar.
  • Apesmake horrible pets.
  • A good attitude is one of the most important things.
reading
Reading

“My Heroes” pg. 634-636

chapter 18 illustration paragraph
Chapter 18 Illustration Paragraph
  • Chapter 18 begins on pg. 352
    • This chapter will give you good guidance on writing a good paragraph in this style.
    • Please use the chapter to help you write your paragraph
  • See examples on pg 363 - 366
chapter 3

Chapter 3

Subjects and Verbs

sentences p 35
Sentences p. 35
  • What is a complete sentence?
    • It is a group of words that has three parts to it.
      • 1) A subject
      • 2) A Verb
      • 3) A Complete Thought
    • Joseph lifts weights.
finding the subject
Finding the Subject
  • How do you find the subject in a simple sentence?
  • 5 Tips for finding the subject.
  • Tip 1: The subject usually answers the question “who or what is this sentence about?”
finding the subject1
Finding the Subject
  • Tip 2: The subject often is at the beginning of the sentence.
  • Practice p. 35
  • 1) The gym seemed noisier than usual.
  • 2) Our coach was shouting last-minute instructions.
  • 3) He expected total concentration.
  • 4) Three athletes were doing push-ups.
  • 5) People were beginning to fill the bleachers.
finding the subject2
Finding the Subject
  • Tip 3: The subject of a sentence is usually a noun or a pronoun.
  • What is a noun?
  • A noun is a word that names a person, place, thing or idea.
  • A noun can also be Common or Proper.
finding the subject3
Finding the Subject

CommonProper

Person: singer John Mayer

painter Pablo Picasso

Place: ballpark AT&T Park

building Empire State Building

Thing: watch Rolex

trophy World Cup

Idea beauty, patriotism, happiness, justice

finding the subject4
Finding the Subject
  • Practice p. 36
  • 1) The morning of June 27 was clear and sunny.
  • 2) The flowers were blossoming profusely, and the grass was richly green.
  • 3) The people of the village began to gather in the square.
  • 4) The lottery was conducted by Mr. Sommers.
  • 5) The jovial man had time and energy to devote to civic activities.
finding the subject5
Finding the Subject
  • What is a pronoun?
  • It is a word that takes the place of a noun.
  • Practice p. 36
  • 1) The crowd arrived early.
    • They arrived early
  • 2) The gym was noisy.
    • It was noisy
finding the subject6
Finding the Subject
  • 3) People waited eagerly.
    • They waited eagerly.
  • 4) Coach Ann Bradway had not lost a game yet this season.
    • She had not lost a game yet this season.
  • 5) Steven and I found the best seats in the front row.
    • We found the best seats in the front row.
  • 6) Not one person could predict the outcome.
    • Nobody (or No one) could predict the outcome.
finding the subject7
Finding the Subject

Pronouns Chart (p. 37)

Personal Pronouns:

SingularPlural

1st person: I we

2nd person: you you

3rd person: he, she, it they

finding the subject8
Finding the Subject

Pronouns

  • Relative pronouns
    • Who
    • What
  • Demonstrative pronouns
    • this
    • that
    • these
    • those
finding the subject9
Finding the Subject
  • Tip 4: Noun or pronouns can be modified by adjectives.
  • What is an adjective?
    • A word that modifies (describes or limits) a noun or a pronoun.
      • young Avon He is young.
finding the subject10
Finding the Subject
  • Practice (p. 37)
    • First find the nouns or pronouns, then the adjectives.
  • 1) The swimmer was confident.
    • Nouns and pronouns : swimmer
    • Adjectives: confident
  • 2) Her long and strenuous workouts would soon pay off.
    • Nouns and pronouns : workouts
    • Adjectives: her long strenuous
finding the subject11
Finding the Subject
  • 3) Several meters remained to reach the finish line.
    • Nouns and pronouns : meters line
    • Adjectives: Several finish
  • 4) Suddenly, she felt a terrible cramp in one leg.
    • Nouns and pronouns: She cramp leg
    • Adjectives: terrible one
  • 5) A disappointing defeat would be the result.
    • Nouns and pronouns: defeat result
    • Adjectives: disappointing
finding the subject12
Finding the Subject
  • Tip 5: The subject of a sentence can be compound. (There can be more than one subject in a sentence.)
  • Practice (p. 38)
  • 1) Exercise and diet are the secrets to good health.
  • 2) Mothers and fathers should help their children establish healthy lifestyles.
  • 3) Unfortunately, biological factors or environmental factors could cause health problems.
finding the subject13
Finding the Subject
  • 5 Tips for finding the subject of a sentence.
  • 1) The subject answers the question “who or what is the sentence about.”
  • 2) The subject is usually towards the beginning of the sentence.
  • 3) The subject is a noun or a pronoun
  • 4) Nouns and pronouns can be modified by adjectives
  • 5) There can be more than one subject in a sentence.

Exercises 1 (p. 39)

finding the subject14
Finding the Subject
  • Exercises 1 (p. 39)
  • 1) The train stopped.
    • Train
  • 2) Steven Laye had arrived.
    • Steven Laye
  • 3) He was afraid.
    • He
slide23

4) Everything looked so strange.

    • Everything
  • 5) The fearful man held his bag tightly.
    • man
  • 6) The tunnel led up to the street.
    • Tunnel
finding the subject15
Finding the Subject
  • 7) Buses and cars choked the avenues.
    • Buses cars
  • 8) People rushed everywhere.
    • People
  • 9) The noise gave him a headache.
    • Noise
  • 10) Loneliness filled his heart.
    • loneliness
prepositions
Prepositions

What is a

preposition?

It is any word

that can

describe the

relationship of a caterpillar

to an apple.

prepositional phrases
Prepositional Phrases
  • Prepositions are always found in prepositional phrases.
  • A phrase is a group of words that lacks either a subject or a verb and functions as a single part of speech.
  • A prepositional phrase (and all the words in it) is only a prepositional phrase and never anything else.
prepositional phrases1
Prepositional Phrases
  • A preposition will always start the phrase, and a noun ends it.
  • at hotels
  • for Isaac
  • with milk
prepositional phrases2
Prepositional Phrases
  • They can also have other words in them. They may have adjectives that describe the object of the preposition:
  • I put my teddy bear behind my blue pillow
  • below the yellow blanket
  • over the television
  • BUT... they MUST all begin with a preposition and end with a noun or pronoun
prepositional phrases3
Prepositional Phrases
  • Prepositions are ALWAYS in a prepositional phrase.
  • Prepositional phrases start with a preposition and end with a noun… ALWAYS.
  • If you start a sentence with a prepositional phrase you must put a comma at the end of it.
  • If you put a prepositional phrase in the middle or end of a sentence you do not need a comma.
prepositional phrases4
Prepositional Phrases
  • Dates and the names of places are nouns. They often require commas.
    • 1901 J st, Sacramento, California
    • Friday, February 11, 2011
  • If we use these to end prepositional phrases we must include all of the date or the name of the place.
prepositional phrases5
Prepositional Phrases
    • THE SUBJECT OR VERB OF A SENTENCE IS NEVER IN A PREPOSITIONAL PHRASE!!
  • See list of common prepositions on p. 41, and common prepositional combinations on p. 42.
prepositional phrases6
Prepositional Phrases
  • Exercise 6 (p. 42)
  • People across the country are anxious about high heating costs. After the devastating Gulf Coast hurricanes of 2005, fuel prices spiked. On account of these higher fuel prices, many people are making changes to their homes. Some are turning their fears into actions. They have consulted with energy specialists for recommendations. They have plugged cracks, insulated attics, and crawled underneath warm blankets.
prepositional phrases7
Prepositional Phrases
  • People across the country are anxious about high heating costs. After the devastation Gulf Coast hurricanes of 2005, fuel prices spiked. On account of these higher fuel prices, many people are making changes to their homes. Some are turning their fears into actions. They have consulted with energy specialists for recommendations. They have plugged cracks, insulated attics, and crawled underneath warm blankets.
prepositional phrases8
Prepositional Phrases
  • 1) On Friday, January 27, 2006, Western Union sent its last telegram.
  • 1) On Friday, January 27, 2006, Western Union sent its last telegram.
  • 2) With the ascendancy of modern technology, the telegram is no longer needed.
  • 2) With the ascendancy of modern technology, the telegram is no longer needed.
prepositional phrases9
Prepositional Phrases
  • 3) In 1851 in Rochester, New York, Western Union had its beginnings.
  • 3) In 1851 in Rochester, New York, Western Union had its beginnings.
  • 4) Messages were transmitted by Morse code over the wires and delivered by couriers.
  • 4) Messages were transmitted by Morse code over the wires and delivered by couriers.
prepositional phrases10
Prepositional Phrases
  • 5) Eventually, telegraph service drove the pony express out of business.
  • 5) Eventually, telegraph service drove the pony express out of business.
  • 6) Until the emergence of the telegraph, the average delivery time for a message by pony express took ten days.
  • 6) Until the emergence of the telegraph, the average delivery timefor a message by pony express took ten days.
prepositional phrases11
Prepositional Phrases
  • 7) At the height of the telegram business, in 1929, two hundred million telegrams were sent around the world.
  • 7) At the height of the telegram business, in 1929, two hundred million telegrams were sent around the world.
  • 8) Now for Western Union, money transfers, bill payments, and products such as telephone service and internet access will form the core of their business.
  • 8) Now for Western Union, money transfers, bill payments, and productssuch as telephone service and internet access will form the core of their business.
prepositional phrases12
Prepositional Phrases
  • 9) In the past, families sent messages of births, deaths, birthdays, and weddings by telegram.
  • 9) In the past, families sent messages of births, deaths, birthdays, and weddings by telegram.
  • 10) In the present era, e-mail and fax messages have taken the place of the telegram.
  • 10) In the present era, e-mail and fax messages have taken the place of the telegram.
appositive phrases
Appositive Phrases
  • What is an appositive phrase?
    • A group of words that gives us extra information about a noun or a pronoun in that sentence. It always starts and ends with a comma.
    • We use them to add more information into our sentences and give more information about someone or something that we have already named.
    • We can check if it’s an appositive phrase if we can remove it from the sentence and the sentence still makes sense.
    • THE SUBJECT OR VERB OF A SENTENCE IS NEVER IN AN APPOSTIVIE PHRASE!!
appositive phrases1
Appositive Phrases
  • My mother, a lovely woman, baked cupcakes for my birthday.
  • My mother baked cupcakes for my birthday.
  • Henry, my little puppy, chewed my shoes apart while I was gone.
  • Henry chewed my shoes apart while I was gone.
appositive phrases2
Appositive Phrases
  • Practice (p. 43)
  • 1) Alex Harkavy, a high school senior, has an auditory-processing disorder.
  • 1) Alex Harkavy, a high school senior, has an auditory-processing disorder.
  • 2) Marcia Rubinsein, an educational consultant, can help him find the right college.
  • 2) Marcia Rubinsein, an educational consultant, can help him find the right college.
appositive phrases3
Appositive Phrases
  • 3) For instance, Landmark, a college in Putney, Vermont, specializes in programs for students with learning disablilities.
  • 3) For instance, Landmark, a college in Putney, Vermont, specializes in programs for students with learning disabilities.
  • 4) A federal law, the Americans with Disabilities Act, was enacted in 1990.
  • 4) A federal law, the Americans with Disabilities Act, was enacted in 1990.
appositive phrases4
Appositive Phrases
  • 5) Now many colleges, both public and private ones, offer support for learning-disabled students.
  • 5) Now many colleges, both public and private ones, offer support for learning-disabled students.
  • 6) One particular guide, Peterson’s Colleges with Programs for Students with Learning Disabilities or Attention Deficit Disorder, is especially helpful.
  • 6) One particular guide, Peterson’s Colleges with Programs for Students with Learning Disabilities or Attention Deficit Disorder, is especially helpful.
other issues finding subjects
Other Issues Finding Subjects
  • Finding subjects in a question.
    • Try turning the question into a statement.
      • Why is he going away?
      • He is going away.
      • How did he find his sister?
      • He found his sister by…
      • Where is her office?
      • Her office is ….
other issues finding subjects1
Other Issues Finding Subjects
  • Finding the subject in sentences starting with there or here.
  • Find out who or what the subject is about.
    • There is a new teacher in the department.
    • There is a new teacher in the department.
    • Here comes the woman now.
    • Here comes the woman now.
other issues finding subjects2
Other Issues Finding Subjects
  • Finding the subject in an instruction or command.
    • When I am giving an instruction or command, I am talking to you, I just don’t always say it.
    • Go to Chicago!
    • (You) go to Chicago!
    • Help your sister.
    • (You) help your sister.
finding the subject in a sentence
Finding the Subject in a Sentence
  • First, look for any prepositional and appositive phrases and cross them out because the subject is NEVERin one of these.
  • Second, if the sentence is a question, rewrite it as a statement.
  • Third, ask “who or what this sentence is about.”
  • Fourth, check to see if the sentence is a command.
finding the subject in a sentence1
Finding the Subject in a Sentence
  • Practice (p. 45)
  • 1) Here in America the sale of human organs for transplant is against the law.
  • 1) Here in America the saleof human organs for transplant is against the law.
  • 2) Unfortunately, there is a disturbing illegal market in the sale of these organs.
  • 2) Unfortunately, there is a disturbing illegal marketin the sale of these organs.
finding the subject in a sentence2
Finding the Subject in a Sentence
  • 3) Where do some people desperately look for kidneys?
  • 3) Where do some people desperately look for kidneys?
  • 4) Why are so many donors exploited and unprotected?
  • 4) Why are so many donors exploited and unprotected?
finding the subject in a sentence3
Finding the Subject in a Sentence
  • 5) Get involved.
  • 5) Get involved. (you)
  • 6) Work toward a solution to this tragic social problem.
  • 6) Work toward a solution to this tragic social problem. (you)
finding the subject in a sentence4
Finding the Subject in a Sentence
  • First, look for any prepositional and appositive phrases and cross them out because the subject is NEVER in one of these.
  • Second, if the sentence is a question, rewrite it as a statement.
  • Third, ask “who or what this sentence is about.”
finding the subject in a sentence5
Finding the Subject in a Sentence
  • Exercise 8 (p. 45)
  • 1) In the night train, the child slept.
  • 1) In the night train, the child slept.
  • 2) Here the motion of the railroad cars lulled the passengers.
  • 2) Here the motion of the railroad cars lulled the passengers.
  • 3) The child’s mother, a single parent, put a coat under the child’s head for a pillow.
  • 3) The child’s mother, a single parent, put a coat under the child’s head for a pillow.
finding the subject in a sentence6
Finding the Subject in a Sentence
  • 4) Outside the window, the lights from small towns and villages twinkled.
  • 4) Outside the window, the lightsfrom small towns and villages twinkled.
  • 5) Sometimes passengers could look into people’s windows.
  • 5) Sometimes passengers could look into people’s windows.
  • 6) There was a silence in the train.
  • 6) There was a silencein the train.
finding the subject in a sentence7
Finding the Subject in a Sentence
  • 7) Why do people travel in the middle of the night?
  • 7) Why do people travel in the middle of the night?
  • 8) In most cases, children will rest quietly at night.
  • 8) In most cases, children will rest quietly at night.
  • 9) Will the woman with a young child and heavy suitcases have a difficult time at the end of the trip?
  • 9) Will the womanwith a young child and heavy suitcases have a difficult time at the end of the trip?
finding the subject in a sentence8
Finding the Subject in a Sentence
  • 10) On the platform, waits an elderly man anxious for the first sight of his grandson.
  • 10) On the platform, waits an elderly man anxious for the first sight of his grandson.
finding the verb of a sentence
Finding the Verb of a Sentence
  • What is a verb?
    • There are different times of verbs, but all of them tell us when something is happening.
    • Present tense:
      • Today, the woman dances.
    • Past tense:
      • Yesterday, the woman danced.
    • Future tense:
      • Tomorrow, the woman will dance.
finding the verb of a sentence1
Finding the Verb of a Sentence
  • Practice (p. 47)
  • 1) The reason for his popularity is his foreign policy.
    • The reason for his popularity is his foreign policy. (Today)
    • The reason for his popularity was his foreign policy. (Yesterday)
    • The reason for his popularity will be his foreign policy. (Tomorrow)
finding the verb of a sentence2
Finding the Verb of a Sentence
  • 2) She has little control over the decision.
    • She has little control over the decision.
      • (Today)
    • She had little control over the decision.
      • (Yesterday)
    • She will have little control over the decision.
      • (Tomorrow)
finding the verb of a sentence3
Finding the Verb of a Sentence
  • 3) The test comes at a bad time.
    • The test comes at a bad time.
      • Today
    • The test came at a bad time.
      • Yesterday
    • The test will come at a bad time.
      • Tomorrow
finding the verb of a sentence4
Finding the Verb of a Sentence
  • Action Verbs
    • Tells us what the subject is doing.
    • The womanstudied ballet.
    • The manhit the ball.
    • The boylicked his ice cream cone.
finding the verb of a sentence5
Finding the Verb of a Sentence
  • Exercise 11 (p. 48)
  • Remember to first look for prepositional and appositive phrases and cross them out.
  • Subjects and verbs are NEVER in these types of phrases.
finding verbs
Finding Verbs
  • 1) Collectors enjoy the search for unusual items.
  • 1) Collectors enjoy the search for unusual items.
  • 2) Some people collect very strange objects.
  • 2) Some peoplecollect very strange objects.
  • 3) A collection, like odd rocks or unique automobiles, will give a person some individuality.
  • 3) A collection, like odd rocks or unique automobiles, will give a person some individuality.
finding verbs1
Finding Verbs
  • 4) One man saved the fortunes from fortune cookies.
  • 4) One mansaved the fortunes from fortune cookies.
  • 5) A group in Michigan often trades spark plugs.
  • 5) A groupin Michigan often trades spark plugs.
  • 6) In Texas, members of a club gather many types of barbed wire.
  • 6) In Texas, membersof a club gather many types of barbed wire.
finding verbs2
Finding Verbs
  • 7) One person in New York kept handouts from the street.
  • 7) One personin New York kept handouts from the street.
  • 8) Arthur Fielder, the late conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, hung hundreds of fire hats on pegs around his study.
  • 8) Arthur Fielder, the late conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, hung hundreds of fire hats on pegs around his study.
finding verbs3
Finding Verbs
  • 9) Tom Bloom finds “inspected by” tickets in the pockets of new clothes.
  • 9) Tom Bloomfinds “inspected by” tickets in the pockets of new clothes.
  • 10) Collections will entertain us from childhood to old age.
  • 10) Collectionswill entertain us from childhood to old age.
finding verbs4
Finding Verbs
  • Linking Verbs (p. 49)
    • It’s a verb that links the subject of a sentence to one or more words that describe the subject.
    • The child is a constant dreamer
      • Who is what?
        • Is links “child” with the idea of “constant dreamer”.
    • She seems distracted.
      • Who seems what?
      • Seems links “she” with the idea of “distracted.”
finding verbs5
Finding Verbs
  • Exercise 13 (p.50)
  • 1) My dream last night was wonderful.
  • 1) My dream last night waswonderful.
  • 2) I had been transformed.
  • 2) Ihad beentransformed.
  • 3) I looked young again.
  • 3) Ilookedyoung again.
  • 4) The house was empty and quiet.
  • 4) The housewasempty and quiet.
finding verbs6
Finding Verbs
  • 5) In a sunlit kitchen with a book in hand, I appeared relaxed and happy.
  • 5) In a sunlit kitchen with a book in hand, Iappearedrelaxed and happy.
  • 6) In the morning light, the kitchen felt cozy.
  • 6) In the morning light, the kitchenfeltcozy.
  • 7) It seemed safe.
  • 7) Itseemedsafe.
finding verbs7
Finding Verbs
  • 8) The brewing coffee smelled delicious.
  • 8) The brewing coffeesmelleddelicious.
  • 9) The bacon, my usual Sunday morning treat, never tasted better.
  • 9) The bacon, my usual Sunday morning treat, never tastedbetter.
  • 10) In this dream world, life felt satisfying.
  • 10) In this dream world, lifefeltsatisfying.
finding verbs8
Finding Verbs
  • Helping Verbs (p. 51)
  • Helping verbs are verbs that combine with a main verb (action or linking) to express a special meaning or help indicate time.
  • He is sleeping. Right now
  • He might sleep. Maybe Now or Future
  • He should sleep. Ought to Now or Future
  • He could have been sleeping. Maybe Past
finding verbs9
Finding Verbs
  • Exercise 15 (p. 52)
  • 1) Graduation from high school does not signal the end of ones learning.
  • 1) Graduation from high school does not signal the end of ones learning.
  • 2) In today’s world, workers must adjust to many changes in the workplace.
  • 2) In today’s world, workers must adjust to many changes in the workplace.
finding verbs10
Finding Verbs
  • 3) They will need to understand new technologies.
  • 3) They will need to understand new technologies.
  • 4) Can they recognize the differences between facts and opinions in news articles?
  • 4) Can they recognize the differences between facts and opinions in news articles?
  • 5) All citizens would benefit from annual refresher courses in their fields.
  • 5) All citizens would benefit form annual refresher courses in their fields.
finding verbs11
Finding Verbs
  • 6) Everyone should read a daily newspaper.
  • 6) Everyone should read a daily newspaper.
  • 7) Senior citizens might take courses at local community colleges.
  • 7) Senior citizens might take courses at local community colleges.
  • 8) Also, they could keep their minds active with crossword puzzles and other games.
  • 8) Also, they could keep their minds active with crossword puzzles and other games.
finding verbs12
Finding Verbs
  • 9) Have people learned to try new recipes from television cooking programs?
  • 9) Have people learned to try new recipes from television cooking programs?
  • 10) Do we take responsibility for keeping our minds curious and engaged?
  • 10) Do we take responsibility for keeping our minds curious and engaged?
putting it all together
Putting it all together
  • 1) Identify prepositional and appositive phrases, and cross them out.
  • 2) Ask “who or what is this sentence about?”
  • 3) Look for the verb.
    • Tells when something is happening
    • Tells who/what is doing something (Action Verbs)
    • Links the subject with other ideas (Linking Verbs)
    • Don’t forget the Helping verbs! (There can be more than one verb in a sentence)
putting it all together1
Putting it all together
  • “Test 1” (p. 55)
  • 1) Into the new century has burst the worldwide phenomenon of a new cyber sport.
  • 1) Into the new century has burst the worldwide phenomenonof a new cyber sport.
  • 2) Jonathan Wendell, a teenager from Kansas City, Missouri, spends eight to ten hours a day at the computer.
  • 2) Jonathan Wendell, a teenager from Kansas City, Missouri, spends eight to ten hours a day at the computer.
putting it all together2
Putting it all together
  • 3) Is he doing his homework?
  • 3) Ishedoing his homework?
  • 4) In fact, Jonathan (his game name is Fatal1ty) is playing video games.
  • 4) In fact, Jonathan (his game name is Fatal1ty) is playing video games.
  • 5) Here in America, this young man has become the best video player.
  • 5) Here in America, this young manhas become the best video player.
putting it all together3
Putting it all together
  • 6) Our first professional cyber athlete has worn forty-one tournaments and has pocketed three hundred thousand dollars in tournament prizes.
  • 6) Our first professional cyber athletehas worn forty-one tournaments and has pocketed three hundred thousand dollars in tournament prizes.
  • 7) Already, this teenager has become the world champion in five different video games.
  • 7) Already, this teenagerhas become the world champion in five different video games.
putting it all together4
Putting it all together
  • 8) Around the world, thousands of people find video games very addictive.
  • 8) Around the world, thousandsof people find video games very addictive.
  • 9) Now Jonathan “Fatal1ty” Wendell has launched his own Fatal1ty products.
  • 9) Now Jonathan “Fatal1ty” Wendell has launched his own Fatal1ty products.
  • 10) Imagine his surprised parents!
  • 10) Imagine his surprised parents! (YOU)
chapter 18 illustration paragraph1
Chapter 18 Illustration Paragraph
  • Chapter 18 begins on pg. 352
    • This chapter will give you good guidance on writing a good paragraph in this style.
    • Please use the chapter to help you write your paragraph
  • See examples on pg 363 - 366
end of class quiz
End of Class Quiz
  • Find the subject in these sentences. Cross out any prepositional phrases
  • 1) In 1999, a young boy was playing baseball.
  • 2) Suddenly, he was hit by a baseball bat.
  • 3) He could not breathe.
  • 4) In fact, his heart had stopped.
  • 5)There was a nurse at the game.
end of class quiz1
End of Class Quiz
  • 6) True or False. In a Illustration paragraph, there is no real need to make a point.
  • 7) True or False. It’s okay to have a few sentences that aren’t totally on topic.
  • 8) What are the three things you need for a complete sentence?
end of class quiz answers
End of Class Quiz Answers
  • 1) In 1999, a young boywas playing baseball.
  • 2) Suddenly, hewas hit by a baseball bat.
  • 3) Hecould not breathe.
  • 4) In fact, his hearthad stopped.
  • 5)There was a nurseat the game.
end of class quiz answers1
End of Class Quiz Answers
  • 6) True or False. In a Narrative paragraph, there is no real need to make a point.
  • 7) True or False. It’s okay to have a few sentences that aren’t totally on topic.
  • 8) What are the three things you need for a complete sentence?
    • Subject, verb and a complete thought.
homework
Homework
  • Journal 3 due
  • Illustration paragraph due. See Ch. 18
  • Questions for Critical Thinking, pg 636 3, 4 and 5 for reading “My Heroes” pg. 634-636

Hello all,

I am so sorry that I was not able to be with you today. I look forward to seeing you all next week. Please email me if you have any questions regarding the assignments.

With gratitude,

Ms. Sloan